Blog

Ski Resorts and The Tour of Utah

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 13, 2019

The Deseret News shares that a developer plans to make Utah site the first new full-service ski resort in country since 1980 - By Amy Donaldson. For nearly 40 years, no developer has managed to build and open a new, full-service ski resort, but it’s not because there wasn’t demand for one or a desire to do so.

"I know that the mountains are littered with developers who thought they were going to do something and nothing happened,” said Gary Barnett, founder and chairman of Extell Development Company, who unveiled plans Monday for a ski resort and village that includes hotels, condominiums and residential housing. ”I mean, nothing has really been done in the country in the last 30 years, since Beaver Creek, really. … It’s so hard to do.”

So what makes a guy who doesn’t even ski think he can do what no one else has managed since 1980? A unique set of circumstances and colleagues with a vision.”I think once again, one of the important things for us was the ability to tap into tax increment financing,” he said, referring to the fact that Wasatch County had designated the Mayflower Resort area as a place where Utah’s Military Industrial Development Agency could build a recreation hotel, which returns some of the property tax generated from development to developers in exchange for reduced fees for military personnel.

”The fact that MIDA is there, supporting it and helping speed up the process, was a very necessary component for me to get involved. I would not have gotten involved otherwise,” Barnett said. The project — Mayflower Mountain Resort — is ambitious in its scope, with plans for 5,600 acres that are just west of U.S. 40 and Jordanelle Reservoir (near Exit 8) and adjacent to Deer Valley that includes 1,520 residential units, 825 hotel rooms and commercial units and 600 skier parking spaces.

It will be the first recreation project created to work with the military for the state, said Kurt Krieg, vice president of development. The Military Industrial Development Agency is a state-run economic development entity with a military focus, which in this case, offers ski resort vacation opportunities to military personnel at a fraction of the cost.

Among the advantages the new resort will have is its proximity to one of the state’s top rated resorts — Deer Valley. ”We have the ability to connect to Deer Valley,” Barnett said, noting that Extell just renegotiated a lease of land to Deer Valley that makes the future more predictable for both entities. ”Obviously, they’d have to purchase a Deer Valley ticket, but there is that ability to provide skiing. We feel like the access from our side of the mountain is exceptional.”

The location of Mayflower may offer it some unique advantages that other start-ups don’t enjoy, including 35 minutes and no stop lights from the Salt Lake City International Airport to the freeway exit.

”There is no other resort of this scale, maybe around the world, that I know of that is 35 minutes from a major, international airport,” he said. “It’s going to have access to everywhere. … That’s the No. 1 thing Utah has going for it is this access. And we have straight highway, no traffic lights. … So we’ve got everything in our favor to get this thing done.” The goal is to have the village and some ski runs open within five years.

Extell has discussed climate change challenges, as they planned the development and acquired land, Barnett said. It also hopes to be supportive, if not involved in, Utah’s bid for another Winter Olympics in 2030 or 2034. “We love the idea, and we’d love to be involved in it,” he said. “Anything we do would have to be coordinated with Deer Valley and the state of Utah, but we certainly love the idea of playing a very active role. We hope we get it in 2030.”

Some of what Barnett and his team envision is similar to what’s out there. Some of it is unique. But before they can begin to build anything, they are conducting a voluntary cleanup of the mountain, because the last mining companies left in 1969 without the resources to clean up any contamination. The land has been vacant, even as development occurred around it, in part because of the contamination and in part because it was owned by a foreign trust with a trustee who sought a higher price than anyone was willing to pay.

As the trustees re-negotiated representation, the land became available and then it was a matter of cleaning up the contamination in order to develop it in the ways Extell envisions. On Monday, several members of the Extell team and the Military Industrial Development Agency representatives took media on a tour of the picturesque site, pointing out where ski lifts might be, where water tanks will be installed and how cleanup will work.

In some places, as much as 18 inches of soil is being removed and it will be taken to a central location and capped, as is standard in these types of cases, according to Krieg, who led the tour. While no other full service resort has opened in the U.S. since 1980, about a half dozen terrain parks or ski resorts without on-site lodging have opened, including Cherry Peak, which is 20 minutes outside Logan, and two hours north of Salt Lake City. But nothing like most of Utah’s resorts — and nothing like what Extell has planned for Mayflower Resort.

”We have the makings of a really beautiful resort town,” he said. “And that’s what we’re looking at doing.”

The Tour of Utah is once again scheduled to pedal two of its six legs through Summit County and finish on Main Street in Park City. This year’s race covers 477 miles around northern Utah as racers compete in 13 King of the Mountain climbs up an estimated 37,882 feet, and through another 15 sprint competitions. The main events for Summit County spectators are scheduled to take place on Saturday, Aug. 17, the fifth leg of the race, and Sunday, Aug. 18, the sixth and final stage.

The fifth stage of the race begins at 2:30 p.m. and will loop from the Canyons Village at Park City mountain around the Jordanelle and Rockport reservoirs before heading back to the resort. There will be sprint lines in Kamas and Hoytsville, bracketed by King of the Mountain challenges back up to the Jordanelle and through Browns Canyon.

In the day’s final miles, racers will ride through Kimball Junction up to the Utah Olympic Park and will cut down Bear Hollow drive before a final push along Canyons Resort Drive and High Mountain Road to the finish near the Umbrella Bar in Canyons Village. Frontrunners are expected to finish around 6 p.m. A free concert with Florida-based jazz trio Honey Hounds is set to take place after the awards ceremony at 6:30 p.m.

The route, first introduced in 2012, covers 78.2 miles with 10,000 feet of climbing. Racers will leave from Main Street at approximately 12:30 p.m. and head out of the city to Brown’s Canyon with another sprint line in Kamas before zig-zagging into a 2.1-mile KOM climb through Wolf Creek Ranch. The riders will descend into Wasatch County down to Heber, entering the race’s final sprint section in Midway before the grueling six-mile climb along Pine Canyon Road up to Empire Pass. After topping out, racers will ride the switchbacking descent down Marsac Avenue and race up Main Street to the finish line.

“We’re excited to have the Tour of Utah returning to Main Street,” said mayor Andy Beerman via email. “Main Street is an iconic finish to a race that not only highlights amazing athletes, but also Utah’s most spectacular landscapes.” For more information go to TourofUtah.com.

It’s official: Deer Valley is hosting another freestyle World Cup this winter. The U.S. Ski and Snowboard sent out a press release confirming the FIS winter schedule, including the Intermountain Healthcare Freestyle International, on Feb. 6-8. The Freestyle International will include moguls, aerials and dual moguls competitions, with a viewing area at the top of Deer Valley’s Burns and Snowflake lifts above Snow Park Lodge. This year will be the 20th that Deer Valley has hosted the event, which has become a favorite of athletes and spectators.

“Deer Valley is honored to have been selected as a venue for another freestyle skiing World Cup and to be able to continue our long tradition of hosting these international competitions,” said Emily Summers, a spokeswoman for Deer Valley in an email. “We are looking forward to welcoming the mogul and aerial teams back to Deer Valley in 2020.”

The resort was the host site for the 2019 World Championships and has a storied past in freestyle skiing. It was where Jonny Moseley performed the Dinner Roll during the 2002 Olympics, spurring a rules change to allow inversions, and where Mikael Kingsbury became the winningest moguls skier in history last year.

The event is particularly pertinent to the U.S. freestyle teams, which are based out of Park City and consider the venue their home turf. At the World Championships in February, Americans Brad Wilson and Jaelin Kauf both medaled in dual moguls.

The U.S. Alpine team will host the HomeLight Killington Cup on Nov. 30 through Dec. 1 in Vermont. That event is followed on the Alpine calendar by Birds of Prey at Beaver Creek in Colorado on Dec. 6 through 8.

In cross-country skiing, the Fastenal Parallel 45 Winter Festival in Minneapolis will be held over four days in March, including a music festival, panel discussions and the first cross-country World Cup to come to the U.S. in 19 years. The longstanding drought was broken thanks to the U.S. team’s performance at the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Games, where Jessie Diggins and Kikkan Randall took home the nation’s first-ever gold.

The World Cup cross-country freestyle sprint event will be held on March 17, and will act as the second leg of a mini sprint tour that begins in Quebec City the weekend before.

The freeskiing and snowboarding World Cup halfpipe season is scheduled to begin at Copper Mountain on Dec. 11-14.

On Jan. 29 to Feb. 1, skiers and boarders will compete in slopestyle and halfpipe at Mammoth Mountain in California. One more major freeski and snowboarding event will be added to the U.S. calendar in the coming weeks, the press release stated.

“Fans of ski and snowboard sports have a lot to look forward to in the coming season, especially here in the U.S.,” said U.S. Ski and Snowboard President and CEO Tiger Shaw in the press release. “We have the cross-country World Cup coming back to America for the first time in nearly 20 years with the event in Minneapolis in March. That is going to be an awesome event, giving Jessie Diggins, Sophie Caldwell, Sadie Bjornsen and their teammates (including Park City’s Rosie Brennan) the opportunity to race at World Cup level on home soil for the first time in their careers, in front of thousands of people.”

Market Reports:

Reasons to Hire a Real Estate Agent

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 10, 2019

Since 2006 my wife and I have had the great pleasure of being a part of the real estate community. We represent buyers and sellers in the Greater Park City area as well as in Salt Lake City. This week we wanted to share the Top 6 Reasons to Hire a Real Estate Agent to Sell Your Home - As a homeowner, there's only so much you can do when trying to sell your home. When it comes to real estate, hiring a professional agent is more of a need than an option. A real estate agent's greatest goal is to sell your house at a higher price in a lesser number of days.

While it's possible to sell a home without representation, it's important to remember that real estate is also a legal matter. In fact, there has been a massive increase in scammers targeting real estate clients because they're fully aware that some people don't seek agent representation. If you decide to sell your house, understand that it's a heavy process with many stakes involved. Here are some reasons why hiring a real estate agent is crucial:

Years of Experience - Nothing can beat experience. As a homeowner, you might believe in relying on the internet, family or friends; however, the experience of a professional real estate agent is what will truly help you secure a worthy investment. With years of experience in cracking the real estate code, agents know the times of the year when house prices go up and when potential buyers are most active. Hiring an agent will save you the stress of learning everything about buying and selling a house.

Negotiation Skills - Experience also endows real estate agents with impressive negotiation skills. Dealing with buyers, brokers and legal representatives on a daily basis, real estate professionals know exactly what each stakeholder wants. Agents have the skills to negotiate prices well and secure a worthy investment. You'll never be disappointed after hiring a competent agent because they'll provide the best representation for your property.

Access to a Critical Database - Real estate agents have deep connections and access to crucial real estate databases. The Multiple Listing Service (MLS) is an interface of all the current homes for sale. When you hire an agent, all the information required to sell your house will be available over the MLS for other agents. Your agent can effectively advertise your property by featuring an attractive package. With instant visibility, there are far more chances of selling your house quicker than when you may have tried it on your own. With greater access to buyers, you can sell your house fast instead of waiting and lowering the price. Hiring an agent may seem costly at first, but it can give you the upper hand in steering the price of your house.

Network of Professionals - Agents can never give their best service in isolation. With experience and education, they will always have a pool of professionals that they stay in touch with for speedy selling, buying and referrals. Agents work with many other people who can directly impact the price of your property.

Knowledge of Market Conditions - Real estate professionals have to stay updated with the rising house prices, and the best times to invest in the real estate market. They have insights into the market conditions that'll eventually dictate the price at which you sell your house. There are many calculations involved when it comes to learning the real estate climate. Data like the average-per-square foot cost, average house sale prices, list-to-sold prices and how long a house stays on the market are all things that ultimately decide how fast your house sells. Learning about this can be a hefty task, especially when you have to take care of the investment and insurance. Instead of taking all the stress yourself, hire an agent to guide you accordingly. You'll save both time and money.

Confidentiality and Security - As mentioned, with scammers on the rise, it only makes sense to hire a professional who will keep all your information confidential until the deal closes. With your identity papers, bank statements and mortgages at stake, hiring an agent is critical. Sometimes, even the smoothest transactions can have issues like tax assessments and missing stamps. Missing even a single step of selling your house can come back to haunt you. Enjoy the peace of mind that follows placing your property in safe hands.

Buying and selling a house is no joke—it's a lifetime investment. While these are only a handful of reasons eliciting the importance of a real estate agent, hiring one will save you from the trouble of paperwork, taxing complications, and, most of all, fraudulent schemes.

With the beautiful weather in Park City, it is time to be outside and if you’re lucky enough to have outdoor space (even if it’s just a sliver of grass) you’ll want to make the most of it. But knowing where to start can be tricky. Here are 7 Design Ideas to Make the Most of Your Backyard:

Swinging Seat - If you have the space, consider creating a variety of seating options — the neutral color palette ties together each of these. Warning: Hanging a hammock or swinging chair means that guests will be rushing over to your place whenever they get the chance. Kids and adults alike will love kicking back with a good book and a refreshing glass of lemonade all summer long. And when in doubt: add string lights.

Family Friendly Features - This backyard allows for plenty of space to play. But despite all of the kid-friendly equipment, it still manages to look stylish. Hang a macramé piece under a covered area for a boho touch, and set out some mod chairs to keep the look current.

Comfy and Cool - How stunning is this covered patio space? The homeowners with the backyard featured in the previous photo also did an excellent job styling this seating area. We love the addition of string bulb lights (again, a backyard essential) and the fun and funky egg chair. Pillows and a throw blanket add texture and necessary warmth for chillier nights.

Festive Fire Pit - Gather round! Group your chairs around a fire pit and set out poufs for extra seating if the weather permits. You’ll have the ideal space to spend many a summer evening talking and laughing with friends and neighbors—and indulging in a s’more or two.

Poolside Perch - Lucky enough to have a pool? Add a comfy outdoor couch and chairs, and you’ll never want to leave the yard. Adults can supervise little ones while kicking back and relaxing in the shade.

Patterned Patio - Having guests over? Jazz up patio furniture with the addition of colorful throws and patterned pillows to bring a well-traveled look to your backyard space. Pattern-mixing newbie? Stick to one color palette (here: pinks, blues, browns, and whites), to tie everything together.

Kids Only - Create a special oasis for the kids by setting up an outdoor dining space that’s just their size. Giant buckets make for great toy storage (which means easy access while the adults are still eating).

  1. Content Plr says:

    Pretty great post. I just stumbled upon your blog and wanted to say that I've really enjoyed surfing around your blog posts. After all I will be subscribing to your rss feed and I am hoping you write again soon!

  2. bookmarked!!, I love your website!

Best State To Live In

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jun 19, 2019

According to the personal finance website WalletHub via KUTV it turns out that the Beehive State is one of the best states to live in the country, Utah is the ninth-best state to live in the United States. WalletHub stated in its Tuesday report that Utah was ranked ninth overall because of it has the lowest average weekly work hours out of all 50 states, along with ranking in the top 30 among the report's five key dimensions: affordability, economy, education and health, quality of life and safety.

WalletHub also shared in its report that Utah placed in the top 10 because of its rankings in various living conditions categories, including: 24th - Housing costs, 9th - Homeownership, 8th - Percent of the population in poverty and 6th - Income growth; percent of adults in fair or poor health.

Here are the top 10 best states to live in order: Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Colorado, Wisconsin, Virginia, Iowa, Utah and Idaho.

On the other side of the list, these were the 10 worst states to live in the country: Mississippi, Louisiana, New Mexico, Arkansas, Alabama, Alaska, South Carolina, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Kentucky.

As Park City and Salt Lake City continue to grow so do personalities, we found a great article that explains those personalities in - The Best Affordable City to Live for Every Myers-Briggs Personality Type - Your Myers-Briggs personality type can seem surprisingly apt: “Why yes,” you might say while reading your personality description, “I don’t like theories and abstracts, and I do leap before I look! This explains so much.” Sometimes, an internet quiz actually can go a long way in figuring out who you are. Or figuring out where to live.

Salt Lake City, Utah - ESTP. You like to move fast and break things. No shame in that. Your perfect city may be surprising: You’ll be packing up and moving to Salt Lake City, Utah. This western metropolis is one of the country’s best tech cities outside San Francisco. Keeping your attention may be a challenge, but with the state’s wide variety of outdoor activities—and a growing art scene—there’s no shortage of interesting activities.

Not sure what type you are? Take the test.

Moving on to Market Reports - we have our most recent market reports for Upper Deer Valley, Empire Pass, Lower Deer Valley, Deer Crest, Jordanelle, Old Town and the Canyons area. Have a great rest of your week.

No alt text provided for this image
No alt text provided for this image
No alt text provided for this image
No alt text provided for this image
No alt text provided for this image
No alt text provided for this image
No alt text provided for this image

Summer Colors

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jun 05, 2019

Park City is in full bloom and we thought it would be a great idea to open this week's post with paint colors to brighten your home and mood. We will also share some of the international bites in town as well as where to get great cups of local coffee. If picking out a paint color was easy, we’d all do it a lot faster in The 10 Living Room Paint Colors Design Pros Swear By. Paint may not cost a ton, especially if you’re DIYing the job. But who wants to waste time putting the wrong color up on their walls? Here, 11 designer-approved living room paint shades—straight from the designers themselves.

Benjamin Moore King Arthur’s Court (1081) - “Benjamin Moore’s King Arthur’s Court in a matte finish is such an elegant and earthy backdrop, perfect for creating a mood of calm and airy lightness in a living room,” says designer Caitlin Murray, founder of Black Lacquer Design.

Behr Campfire Ash (N320-1) - “One of the best colors for a living room is Campfire Ash from Behr,” says designer Linda Hayslett of LH. Designs. “It’s a great easy, soft color that can blend with any style and space. It’s casual and comfy all at the same time since it’s a greige color.”

Sherwin-Williams Pure White (SW7005) - “Sherwin-Williams’ Pure White is my go-to paint color for living room spaces,” says designer Abbe Fenimore, founder of Studio Ten 25. “I love the fresh feel of white walls and how it creates the perfect backdrop for any color palette. Many people are not a fan of white walls because they show every scuff, but keeping a Mr. Clean Magic Eraser around easily solves that problem.”

Benjamin Moore Graphite (1603) - “When we want to go bold, our go-to living room paint color is Benjamin Moore’s Graphite,” says Jess Blumberg of Dale Blumberg Interiors. “It’s the perfect warm charcoal, so it works with just about any other neutral or color scheme.”

Benjamin Moore Grey Owl (2137-60) - “Lately, I’m focusing even less on color and more on the texture like Venetian Plaster,” says designer Ana Claudia Schultz of Ana Claudia Design. “First, you select your base, Grey Owl from Benjamin Moore is my go-to, then add white plaster to it (the process is more complicated than it sounds so I suggest you hire a professional). Once completed, your space will still be light and bright but full of depth and texture.”

Benjamin Moore Misty Gray (2124-60) and Slate Teal (2058-20) - “One of my favorite whites is called Misty Gray by Benjamin Moore,” says designer Jennifer Wallenstein of September Workshop. “It’s bright and crisp without feeling stark and works beautifully with warm and cool tones. But I am also a fan of a bold wall, and Slate Teal by Benjamin Moore is an amazing shade of blue that comes alive in sunlight and feels perfectly moody at night.”

Behr Bit of Sugar (PR-W14) - “Behr’s Bit of Sugar, a fan favorite, is a trustworthy white with minimal undertones,” says Atlanta-based interior designer and blogger Kevin O’ Gara. “I specified a high gloss finish for extra shine, adding a bit more luminosity to the living room and maximizing the natural light we get in the space.”

Benjamin Moore Chelsea Gray (HC-168) - “We love to use a deep tone like Benjamin Moore’s Chelsea Gray in a living room with so much natural light,” says designers Cynthia Stafford and Lindi Bolinger of TruDesign Colorado. “Using a deeper color in an area more prone to the use of artificial light has a tendency to make the space feel smaller.” But when natural light is present, the opposite is true. “It can really open up your living room and allows you to play with more color when it comes to furniture, draperies and accessories,” says Stafford and Bolinger.

Benjamin Moore Simply White (0C-117) - “Simply White is a softer warmer white that allows for a perfect canvas as we design a living room,” say the designers at Hudson + Bloum. “We have used in our coastal projects and also our mountain project—it’s always clean and fresh.”

Behr Seagull Gray N360-1 - “Behr’s Seagull Gray is the perfect gray that is not too cool and not too warm,” says designer Gail Wright of Gail Wright At Home. “It is just a subtle touch of color for your walls that goes well with any other color you want to incorporate into the room.”

Park City Magazine shares Prowling Park City for Global Goodies - 7 Local dishes that deliver scrumptious international flavor. A ski town with a mining past life might not be the first place you’d expect to find exotic restaurant foods. But in the case of Park City, global cuisines are deliciously well represented, from Asia to the Caribbean and South America to Australia. Let’s take a tour.

Shabu owners Kevin and Robert Valaika refer to what they cook up as “freestyle Asian cuisine.” And a big draw here is Mongolian-style shabu shabu, where you cook your own proteins and veggies right at the table in a cooker filled with a choice of fragrant broths. 442 Main St, 435.645.7253, shabuparkcity.com

It’s a real treat finding the sunny, authentic flavors of Jamaica in a snowy ski town. At 11Hauz in Kimball Junction, you’ll find dishes like jerk chicken and even the traditional Jamaican dish, ackee and saltfish. Ackee is a pear-shaped fruit of the soapberry family that sort of has a scrambled egg consistency. When it’s cooked up with salted cod, onions and peppers, you’ve got some serious island flavors going down, “mon.” 1241 Center Dr, 435.200.8972, 11hauz.com 

If you’ve never had pho—or, even if you’ve had lots of it—you’ll be licking your lips for the pho at PC Pho. A traditional Vietnamese soup, pho is to Vietnam as ramen is to Japan. Pho broth is cooked for many hours, usually made with beef bones, fragrantly spiced with star anise, cloves, cinnamon and other good things, then served with rice noodles and a choice of meats and veggies. I especially enjoy the beef brisket and meatball pho at PC Pho…pho sure. 1890 Bonanza Dr, 435.214.7027

For upscale Japanese cuisine and sushi, it’s hard to beat Yuki Yama Sushi. Alongside both traditional and contemporary rolls, nigiri, sashimi and such, are enticingly unique dishes such as kobujime hirame. Kobujime hirame is simply fresh fluke (hirame) treated to a preparation method called kobujime, where the fluke is cured between sheets of kombu (kelp). It’s served with grilled grapefruit oroshi daikon, ponzu, and crispy sunchokes. 586 Main St, 435.649.6293, yukiyamasushi.com

A favorite staple from south-of-the-border is pozole, a traditional Mexican stew made with (typically) pork, onions, hominy and red chile peppers. At Chubasco Mexican Grill, pozole is served authentically, with an array of accoutrements that includes tortillas, chopped onions, oregano, shredded lettuce or cabbage, radishes, salsa, and more. In Mexico, pozole is served to celebrate New Year’s Eve, but at Chubasco you can enjoy it year-round. 1890 Bonanza Dr, 435.645.9114, elchubascomexicangrill.com

When Bridge Café & Grill owner Emerson Oliveira was growing up in Brazil, he probably never imagined he’d be bringing some of the flavors of his homeland to Utah. But with dishes like moqueca baiana, he’s doing precisely that. The bold flavors of Bahia permeate this seafood stew made with shrimp, fish, mussels and clams, all cooked with tomatoes, onions and garlic, plus two Brazilian secret weapons: coconut milk and dendê (palm) oil. It’s a taste of Brazilian sunshine. 825 Main St, 435.658.5451, thebridgecafeandgrill.com

Down under, in Australia, chook is a word used for chicken or hen. And at Aussie-owned Five5eeds restaurant, the savory waffle and chook is a bright taste of Australia: a waffle with chorizo, spinach, and haloumi cheese, topped with tasty morsels of chook. This is scrumptious chicken and waffles, Southern hemisphere style. 1600 Snow Creek Dr, 435.901.8242, five5eeds.com

Food leads us to coffee in Beyond Starbucks: A Guide to Park City’s Indie Coffee Shops Drink coffee, change your world. While Park City’s coffee culture is not quite as established as it is in places like Portland or San Francisco, here you’ll find plenty of charming local joints where you can sip a cup a really good joe, and even couple of local small-batch craft roasters that will satisfy even the most discerning coffee snobs. So take a chance, forego that first impulse to hit up Starbucks and check out these great independent shops around town, we guarantee you won’t be disappointed! (And yes, WiFi is free and available at all of these locations)

Atticus Coffee & Teahouse - A quintessential independent coffee shop, the centrally located Atticus Coffee & Teahouse (738 Main Street) is all the right kinds of funky. Inside you’ll find a cozy seating and a collection of books and souvenirs made by local artists. Instead of a regular coffee, try one of their unique specialty drinks like the Mexican Mocha (spicy dark chocolate) or the store’s namesake, The Finch (Cubano style latte topped with cinnamon). And if you’re looking for a budget-friendly and healthy bite, Atticus is also a reliable place to grab breakfast bagel or sandwich (vegetarian and vegan-friendly options available).

Lucky Ones Coffee - Tucked inside Park City Library, Lucky Ones Coffee (1255 Park Ave) is undoubtedly one of those businesses that will give you warm fuzzys. The operation was started by Katie Holyfield and Taylor Matkins with a special mission in mind: to employ people with disabilities and change the narrative. Everyone is super friendly and we guarantee you’ll leave there with a smile on your face. The library entrance is also one of the best places in town to hang out or do a little work while enjoying a perfect view of library field where Park City’s many dogs come to play with their owners.

Java Cow - If you’re looking for a coffee shop that pays attention to the details, the Java Cow (402 Main St) is the place. Though this longtime Park City business is well-known for it’s homemade ice cream (it’s not unusual for the line for cones to extend out the front door), here they also serve authentic croissants, made according to French method; homemade biscotti, and a wide assortment of coffee drinks, both hot and cold, made with the Logan, Utah-roasted Caffe Ibis coffee.

Campos Coffee - Looking to make their mark in North America, Australia’s Campos Coffee opened their first outpost, also called Campos Coffee (1385 Lowell Ave, Ste AC-106), at the base of the slopes in Park City Mountain’s Town Base. Steps away from the ski lifts, this shop is an ideal pitstop in the morning before hitting the trail and afternoon breaks for a pick-me-up to keep you shredding into the evening. Don’t stop at just coffee, fuel up with smashed avocado toast or and Australian Jaffle (just beware the Vegemite if you’ve never tried it!)  Note: Campos Coffee closes during the shoulder season when the resort is on break; stay up to date with hours of operation here). 

Stoked Roasters & Coffeehouse  - One of Park City’s newest coffee joints, STOKED Roasters (268 Main Street) claims to be the “official coffee of the outdoors.” We’re inclined to believe it given the shop is the passion project of local athlete and professional ultra-runner Jax Mariash (more about this epic wonder woman here). Inside you’ll find plentiful seating, a quiet and friendly atmosphere ideal for working, and a mean cup of coffee. You can also get a dose of inspiration if you’re lucky enough to come in when Mariash is around (or from the epic adventure art on the wall).

Pink Elephant Coffee Shop - You might have some difficulty finding Pink Elephant (509 Main Street) if you don’t know where to look: get there by walking through the Prospect clothing store and up to the second floor. The building is actually home to four local businesses that are worth patronizing (read about the collective here). Founded by passionate coffee roasters Kelley and Mitch Baker, Pink Elephant is all about craft coffee and a gem for any coffee connoisseurs out there. The shop is a tight space and the seating is limited, but perfect if you’re looking for really good coffee or somewhere quiet and away from the crowds. Don’t look for any sugary/sweet drinks here, it’s all about accentuating the flavors of the beans in this shop!

Silver King Coffee  - Yes, sitting around leisurely drinking coffee can be great, but sometimes you just want to get your cup of joe and go. For those occasions, Silver King Coffee (1409 Kearns Blvd) is a convenient solution. Park City’s one and only drive-thru shop, Silver King Coffee looks like a cute little ski shack, complete with a red roof. It’s large enough for only the employees to enter, meaning you drive or walk up to get your coffee fix. In addition to warm and cold coffee drinks, they also have smoothies, tasty breakfast burritos, assorted pastries, and trail mix if you need a snack on the go.

PC Coffee Roasters - Colorful, upbeat, and friendly, PC Coffee Roasters (1764 Uinta Way, Ste B-1) is a local favorite with plenty of regulars for good reason. Not only is their freshly roasted and delicious coffee made right here in town, the service in this shop is impeccable. In addition to coffee, they serve a whole range of pastries, all day breakfast items, sandwiches, and more. Dietary restrictions? No worries, they have you covered with gluten and dairy free options. Chairs, couches, and outdoor seating make this a prime shop for meet-ups and working.

Hugo Coffee - You can’t get more Park City than branding your business with your pup. That’s what Claudia McMullin did when she made her rescue dog Hugo the face of her coffee business in 2014. The bright, colorful bags of beans emblazoned with a dog face are widely available at grocery stores around town, but you can also get the coffee straight from the source at the Hugo Coffee Shop (1794 Olympic Pkwy), housed inside the Park City Visitor’s Center in Kimball Junction. All the beans are roasted in small batches right in town so you can rest assured you’re getting the freshest product possible. The mountain views through the floor to ceiling windows are killer and do a nice job of bringing the outdoors in.

Entrepreneurial Spirit

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 29, 2019

For those people with an entrepreneurial spirit, Utah's capital city is one of the best places in the country to try your luck at being your own boss, new reports say from KSL. A report by FitSmallBusiness.com ranked Salt Lake City No. 6 among the top 10 cities for entrepreneurs in 2019. The study looked at business survival rate, economic growth rate, new business growth, the local financial landscape, area tax climate, the labor market, quality of life and cost of living, explained special project editor Jeff Steen.

"There are a lot of factors, but at the ground level it's about opportunity," he said. "Part of that is an existing infrastructure that supports startup culture." He said in the top-ranked cities, accessibility to investment capital is better than in many other locales compared to the overall population and startup density in those markets.

"Based on those factors, is it possible for startups to secure the funding they need to get off the ground?" he said. "Additionally, the best cities are places that offer resources to entrepreneurs that help them in their quest to get their companies up and running, including mentorship."

The entrepreneurial spirit is strong even in the donut world as The Park Record has shared where to get the best donut in Utah. Votes are in and we agree: Utah’s best donut is sold out of a Kamas gas station! The team of bakers at Mirror Lake Station used to think they made the best doughnuts in the state. Now, they have a plaque to prove it as they were awarded Utah’s Best Donut Award during the Utah Dough Show, a convention for donut-lovers that took place for the first time this year, in Salt Lake City. The station’s raspberry fritter beat out doughnuts from 22 other bakeries from around the state.

The Mirror Lake Station doughnuts have been a Kamas favorite since the station started serving the sweet pastries 40 years ago. Bakers make all of the doughnuts from scratch in a bakery behind the station. On average, 400 doughnuts a day with most of the doughnut recipes having remained the same over the last 40 years. The bakery also makes cookies, bagels, turnovers and croissants. Clara Sargent, the bakery manager, has led the bakery for 15 years. She said she wants to switch things up a little, but she intends to keep the crowd favorites on the shelves for the next 40 years.

We will wrap up this week's blog with the most recent market reports.

No alt text provided for this image
No alt text provided for this image
No alt text provided for this image
No alt text provided for this image
No alt text provided for this image
No alt text provided for this image

Spring Investments

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 15, 2019

Spring is here and summer is on the way and it’s time to get back in the saddle again. Park City Magazine shares Back in the Saddle Again - Take to the trails with early-season mountain biking tips from a pro. Former mountain bike pro, PMBIA certified instructor, and owner of MTB-focused business Women in the Mountains, Erica Tingey shares tips on how to seamlessly get back into fitness after a long winter.

Start slow. Give yourself some space and expect that you’re going to be slow on your first ride out—and that’s OK, Tingey says. “Find a trail that’s not challenging for your first ride back,” she recommends. “I start in Round Valley because there are not any long, sustained climbs.” She also recommends riding the RTS Loop Trail near the Utah Olympic Park, so you can do a few laps. “Find a loop and ride it a few times to feel yourself improving, and to feel your blood vessels and muscles opening up.”

Re-train your vision. Without even realizing it, when you’re in mountain bike shape, your eyes naturally look far ahead to anticipate the terrain and any obstacles. Over the winter, it’s easy to lose that skill, Tingey says. “When you’re getting back into riding, try to look ahead a little bit more than you naturally would. It takes self-control to do this, and to anticipate what’s coming up. The tendency is to look down—force your eyes up.”

Loosen up.“No matter what you’ve been doing over the winter, riding always feels different,” Tingey says. “Your hands might get that itchy feeling from bouncing. And when you’re nervous or tired, you tend to grip too tight, and it’s really hard on your upper body. See if you can loosen up on the climbs and the descents.”

Start with an athletic stance. When you get tired—which can happen quickly during the early season—your posture is one of the first things to decline. Start the year with good habits and think about holding an athletic stance with your core tight, your spine strong, and your neck up. “It might be hard to hold a good posture for all three laps,” Tingey says, “but it’s a good clue to know that when you can’t hold a very good posture, you should call it a day. If you’re not riding in a strong position, you’re setting yourself up for more accidents.”

Turn your fear into excitement. If you’re a bit more skittish on technical sections than you were last year, try to put your nerves to good use. “When I was racing, instead of saying ‘I’m not nervous,’ I’d say, ‘I’m excited to be on my bike,’” Tingey says. “Turn it into positive self-talk. As in ‘I’m OK to get off my bike and walk it.’” She also notes that there’s a difference between trying and doing. “Think Yoda: There is no try.”

Just get on a saddle. If the trails are still too muddy, grab your road bike and to get used to being back in the saddle. “Using your road bike is a way to get some miles in and get used to being back in that position,” Tingey says.

Don’t forget a maintenance check. Whether it’s you or your trusty mechanic, do a thorough check of your bike before hopping on. Check the bolts with torque wrench, clean and lube the drivetrain, and test the front suspension (Tingey says to put a hand on each brake, engage, and stand behind the bike and shock it down—does it feel like it’s going up and down at the same rate as last year?). And, of course, put air in your tires, but maybe a little less than you think. “This year, try three psi less than you ever have and just see if you can get away with it,” advises Tingey.

A reminder: Wait until the trails are dry. “Riding muddy trails ruins it for everyone else for the rest of the season,” Tingey says. “It leaves ruts that aren’t magically fixed from a summer of riding. They are stuck for the rest of the year. You’re really ruining it for yourself and it’s also really hard on your bike.”

Where to find trail updates: Check the Mountain Trails Foundation’s website and Facebook page for the latest trail conditions; Basin Recreation also frequently updates the status on its Instagram and Facebook pages.

Forbes has shared The Best Cities In Utah To Own Investment Property - Based on the Census Bureau’s annual estimates of resident population, from July 2010 to July 2018, Utah’s state population increased by 13.9%, second only to the District of Columbia, and No. 1 out of all 50 states in terms of growth. Utah is an interesting state when it comes to buying and owning investment property. People and businesses have been flocking to the state, and many of its major cities have seen swelling numbers of renters. Major universities, healthcare companies and financial firms like Ally Bank can be found in Utah’s main cities, all of which help boost the economy, and increase the number of residents and appeal of the city to potential investment property owners.

1. Logan, Utah - With 61% of its occupied housing filled by renters, Logan is a fast-growing city whose population is expected to double by 2050. A key feature that makes Logan conducive to investment property owners is the presence of Utah State University, with a student population of nearly 28,000, many of which are renters or looking to rent in off-campus residences. In addition to them, professors, university staff and employees, as well as employees of businesses closely associated with the university, add to a large supply of renters and potential renters in the city. Logan also has the highest gross rental yield of major cities in Utah, i.e. cities with more than 10,000 total occupied housing units.

  • Percentage of renter households: 61%
  • Number of renter households: 10,039
  • Median property price: $235,000
  • Median rent: $1,588
  • Annual rental income: $19,056
  • Gross rental yield: 8.1%
2. Ogden, Utah - Located north of Salt Lake City, about a 30-to-40-minute drive up Interstate 15, Ogden is another great place for potential investment property owners. Property prices are affordable in terms of buy-in, and rents are comparatively high enough to produce a gross rental yield of 6.3%, behind only Logan’s 8.1%.Like Logan, Ogden is a college town, home to Weber State University, which has an undergraduate population of 27,111, according to U.S. News and World Report. The university’s students and staff provide a large pool of potential renters of your investment property in Ogden. In fact, according to the city’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, Weber State University is the No. 4 largest employer in Ogden, behind the Department of Treasury, Weber County School District, McKay-Dee Hospital Center, and ahead of Autoliv, the world’s largest automotive safety supplier, according to their website.
  • Percentage of renter households: 44.6%
  • Number of renter households: 13,442
  • Median property price: $229,900
  • Median rent: $1,207
  • Annual rental income: $14,484
  • Gross rental yield: 6.3%
3. Midvale, Utah - A majority of occupied homes in Midvale are renters, which bodes well for rental property owners. According to Census data from the 2017 American Community Survey, the number of renter-occupied housing units has risen by over 29% from 2010 to 2017. Compare that to the U.S. overall, which has seen an increase of 12.7% over the same period of time. Several major companies have operations in Midvale, with some of the largest employers including Overstock.com, the staffing agency TEKsystems and the financial company SoFi, according to the city’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for 2018.
  • Percentage of renter households: 58.5%
  • Number of renter households: 7,293
  • Median property price: $308,900
  • Median rent: $1,503
  • Annual rental income: $18,036
  • Gross rental yield: 5.8%
4. South Salt Lake - South of Interstate 80, and bisected by the north-south Interstate 15, South Salt Lake is cheaper than Salt Lake City proper, and has a better gross rental yield than the latter city. This is because the median property price is less than $300,000 — whereas in Salt Lake City, it’s $425,000 — while the median rent is still high enough to yield solid rental income over the course of the year. According to South Salt Lake’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for 2018, the biggest private employer is Marriott Vacations Worldwide, a leading timeshare company and publicly traded, which was originally a division of Marriott International before being spun off into its own firm.
  • Percentage of renter households: 58.6%
  • Number of renter households: 5,185
  • Median property price: $291,900
  • Median rent: $1,394
  • Annual rental income: $16,728
  • Gross rental yield: 5.7%
5. Orem, Utah - Orem is an interesting case for potential investment property owners looking to get into the Utah market. According to Census data, from 2017 to 2017, the number of renters increased by 16.4%, while at the same time, the number of owner-occupied homes actually declined: From 17,013 in 2010 to 16,200 in 2017. Like other Utah cities on this list, Orem benefits from being home to Utah Valley University. This public university has an undergraduate population of close to 37,000, according to U.S. News. Besides this vast pool of potential student renters, Utah Valley University is the largest employer in Orem, according to the city’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report.
  • Percentage of renter households: 41.1%
  • Number of renter households: 11,318
  • Median property price: $315,038
  • Median rent: $1,449
  • Annual rental income: $17,388
  • Gross rental yield: 5.5%
6. Provo, Utah - Along with Orem, Provo comprises the Provo-Orem metropolitan area, which has a combined population of 617,678, according to Data USA. The Provo metro area boasts an impressively low unemployment rate of 2.8% in Feb. 2019, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In fact, from Feb. 2014 to Feb. 2019, unemployment in the Provo metro are has averaged 3.1%. Over that same period, the national unemployment rate averaged 4.8%. For investment property buyers, Provo benefits from a high percentage of renters, due no doubt in part because it’s home to Brigham Young University, one of the largest private universities in the country.
  • Percentage of renter households: 59.2%
  • Number of renter households: 19,475
  • Median property price: $309,000
  • Median rent: $1,334
  • Annual rental income: $16,008
  • Gross rental yield: 5.1%
7. Salt Lake City, Utah - The population of Utah’s capital has grown from 184,488 in 2010, to 194,188 by 2017. That’s a little over a 5% increase, and similar to the increase in renter-occupied housing units over the same period: 5%, from 37,735 to 39,626. This trend, along with the majority of the city’s residents being renters, bodes well for potential investment property owners in Utah.
  • Percentage of renter households: 51.5%
  • Number of renter households: 39,626
  • Median property price: $425,000
  • Median rent: $1,598
  • Annual rental income: $19,176
After scrambling for venues last year, the Park City Institute announced its St. Regis Big Stars, Bright Nights Summer Concert Series will continue this year in The Eccles Center for the Performing Arts. Park City Institute Executive Director Teri Orr announced the new location during an unveiling of the series at the Kimball Art Center.According to an Institute press release, the series is as follows: 

 — The Brothers Osborne, July 7. The Grammy Award-nominated duo features T.J. and John Osborne, who have climbed the country charts with the hits “Stay a Little Longer” and “Rum,” while collecting CMA and ACM awards along the way.

 — The Punch Brothers, July 30. The quintet of mandolinist Chris Thile, guitarist Chris Eldridge, bassist Paul Kowert, banjoist Noam Pikelny and violinist Gabe Witcher formed in 2006. The band’s latest album, “All Ashore,” won the 2019 Grammy for Folk Album of the year. Thile is known for his work in Nickel Creek, and is also the host of the weekly NPR broadcast “Live From Here.”

 — Taj Mahal Quartet, and Marc Cohn featuring special guest vocalists, The Blind Boys of Alabama, Aug. 13. Taj Mahal is a two-time Grammy-winning singer, songwriter, film composer, guitarist and multi-instrumentalist who has collaborated with artists such as Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan and Wynton Marsalis.

Cohn, mostly known for the hit “Walking in Memphis,” has performed for Park City Institute three times and as a songwriter has been praised by Time Magazine as “one of the honest, emotional voices we need in this decade.”

The multiple Grammy-winning Blind Boys of Alabama formed in 1939 at the Alabama Institute for the Negro Blind and have since performed for three presidents — Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama.

 — Gone West, Aug. 16. This pop-infused country group features Colbie Caillat, her fiance Justin Young, Caillat’s longtime collaborator Jason Reeves, and Reeves’ wife, Nelly Joy. The band formed, in part, as a result of their experience working together on Caillat’s 2016 tour. The Park City Institute presented Caillat at the Eccles Center in a sold-out performance during that tour.

 — CAM, Aug. 24. Country singer CAM began her career as a songwriter for artists including Sam Smith and Miley Cyrus. Her 2015 Grammy-nominated song “Burning House” hit No. 2 on the U.S. and Canadian country charts, and sold more than 2 million copies. A vocal advocate for music education and inclusion, CAM holds a degree in psychology from University of California Davis, sits on the board of the Academy of Country Music and joined the Recording Academy’s Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion in 2018.

Galleries, Trains and Music

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 07, 2019

As the weather warms up there are plenty of things to do in the Park City area. This week we are highlighting a few art galleries, the 150th Anniversary of the Golden Spike and the 2019 Twilight Concert Series lineup.

It is a rare—and beautiful—thing for so many galleries to set up shop within a half mile of one another, as is the case on Park City’s Main Street. Here Park City Magazine presents an overview of this historic thoroughfare’s art purveyors, highlighting a few of our faves. For a more festive tour, come out during the Park City Gallery Association’s Gallery Stroll, held on the last Friday of every month, 6 to 9 p.m.

Housed in what was once a 19th-century bank, the brightly lit Meyer Gallery (305 Main St, 435.649.8160) features homegrown Utah artists including Brian Kershisnik and Jeffery Pugh. Owner Susan Meyer, whose parents opened the gallery in 1965, says that giving clientele a taste of Mountain West art makes the gallery relevant. And running an art business with integrity is what has made her business thrive over the years.

Maren Mullin, owner of Gallery MAR (436 Main St, 435.649.3001), was just 25 when she launched her namesake gallery. A decade later, some of her early discoveries have evolved from emerging to established—including encaustic artist and Park City resident Bridgette Meinhold and Salt Lake City–based painter Aaron Memmott. No longer the youngest entrepreneur on the block, Mullin says she’s still “constantly learning” in a business that’s rarely black and white.

“One opportunity led to another opportunity that led to another opportunity,” says Colby Larsen, who owns four galleries on Main Street, each occupying its own niche and catering to a specific kind of patron. It started with the contemporary Old Towne Gallery (580 Main St, 435.655.3910), where a Miro and a Warhol hang. Park City Fine Art (558 Main St, 435.649.3583) is a traditional-meets-contemporary Western art gallery. Pando (444 Main St, 435.602.1096) branches into the nature-inspired realm with everything from 50-million-year-old fossils to landscape paintings. Finally, Prospect Gallery (573 Main St, 435.714.0508) fills the timber-hewn Claim Jumper space with blue chip–level pieces from artists like Ashley Collins and Chagall.

The colorful, contemporary art inside the cheery Terzian Galleries (625 Main St, 435.649.4927) reflects owner Karen Terzian’s self-described eclectic taste—from Melissa Chandon’s vivid, 1950s-inspired landscapes to Sara Shepherd Edgar’s humorous, monochromatic depictions of everyday people. But her choices go beyond simply liking an artist’s work at first blush. She researches with an eye for passion, work ethic, and focus.

May 10, 1869 was a turning point in American history. After seven years of arduous work, tens of thousands of man-hours, incredible risk, and hundreds of deaths, the Union Pacific and Central Pacific Railroads finally connected at Promontory Summit, Utah, linking the country from coast to coast for the very first time. On that day, a crowd of workers and dignitaries gathered around the Jupiter and No. 119 steam engines to watch the final golden spike be driven (actually, ceremonially tapped and then later replaced) into the tracks. Celebrate the 150th Anniversary of the Golden Spike by Park City Magazine - Utah commemorates the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad with family-friendly events and exhibits.

Every year, people gather for reenactments of the momentous occasion, but for the 150th anniversary of the Golden Spike, Utah is planning a party of special magnificence. The main commemoratory festival (May 10-12) will, of course, take place at the Golden Spike National Historic Site (6200 North 22300th Street West, Corinne) at Promontory Summit.

Festivities kick-off with the arrival of the Jupiter and #119 replica steam engines arrive at 8:15 a.m. (site opens to the public at 8 a.m.) on May 10. The official opening ceremony (11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.) features a keynote address from renowned presidential scholar and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham, who will offer his perspective on the historical significance of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad. His remarks will be followed by the world premiere of As One, a new musical inspired by the Golden Spike era. Written and directed by award-winning composer, producer, and songwriter Stephen Nelson; lyricist and vocalist Anjanette Mickelsen; and choreographed by Jennifer Park Hohl, As One features five original compositions and a chorus and band comprised of 250 elementary school students from Utah’s 29 counties.

After the opening ceremony, visitors can enjoy a variety of activities, including historical re-enactments, performances from local artists and musicians, interactive exhibits, demonstrations, food trucks, merchants, and more. Highlights include the Frontier Camp where exhibits and storytellers bring the lives of long-gone railroad workforce to life and the STEM Innovation Summit where young innovators can imagine where we’ll soar to by 2069 using today’s aviation, rocketry, and drone technology.

Whistle Stop in Echo, May 8 -Big Boy No. 4014, one of Union Pacific’s historic steam locomotives, rolls into Echo (3525 S. Echo Rd,) as part of Spike 150 revelry. Summit County’s festivities begin at 8 a.m. with live music and food trucks and chug along with the train’s arrival (9:20 a.m.), and it’s departure for Morgan at 9:40 a.m. If you’re feeling particularly sprightly, this presents the perfect opportunity for a morning bike ride or walk on the Historic Rail Trail, which ends/starts in Echo.

From now through June 2, visit the Kimball Art Center to see the work of internationally acclaimed artist Zhi Lin. Lin’s art explores the lost history of the Chinese workers who labored for years on the railroads, often doing the most dangerous work. In conjunction with the exhibit, the Kimball will also host several related events including a free panel discussion Art, Activism, and Immigration (May 11). Visit the Kimball Art Center website for more details.

Don’t want to drive out all the way to Promontory Summit? Head over to Heber on May 10 (5:30 - 9:30 p.m.) for a Golden Spike celebration at the Heber Valley Railroad, featuring live music, trivia, and fireworks. You’ll have the opportunity to dress in period clothes, pose in front of the steam locomotive for fun photos, dance around a bonfire, and more.

The Salt Lake City Arts Council has announced the lineup for the 2019 Twilight Concert Series. (ABC4 News) The concert series is one of the longest-running community events in Salt Lake City. The Thursday night summer concert series has presented artists across the spectrum of musical genres including indie-rock, hip-hop, reggae, and blues.

JULY 20 - HIPPIE SABOTAGE*

JULY 25 - BLIND PILOT, Foxwarren & The Hollering Pines

AUG. 1 - YOUNG THE GIANT, The Aces & Sego

AUG. 8 - VINCE STAPLES, Leikeli47 & Concise Kilgore

AUG. 15 - COURTNEY BARNETT*

AUG. 30 - SANTIGOLD*

*Indicates special guests are TBA

Season tickets for the concert series are on sale now. General tickets go on sale Thursday, May 9 at 10 a.m. You can buy tickets at 24tix.com/twilight.

  1. Lixty.Net says:

    Hi there to every one, as I am genuinely keen of reading this webpage's post to be updated regularly. It includes pleasant information.

  2. Wow, awesome blog layout! How long have you been blogging for? you make blogging look easy. The overall look of your site is wonderful, as well as the content!

Spring Is Here

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 01, 2019

The snow may be back this morning in Park City, but here are some Tips for Reviving Your Lawn After Winter. Early spring is one of the best times of the year to make your home look great. This busy season coincides with an uptick in activity in the real estate market, making it that much more critical for you to get your lawn back in great shape.

Feed It Well - Spring is the most critical time to give your lawn a boost. Winter drags on in many areas of the country, which can deplete a yard come spring. If you find yourself in this situation, try applying a quick-release fertilizer to prepare your lawn for spring. This fertilizer will get to the roots and green up your yard in a few days. However, be cautious when applying a quick-release fertilizer, as putting too much in one spot can kill your grass.Other fertilizer options include slow-release fertilizers that'll feed your lawn over time. This kind of fertilizer usually comes in granules or pellets that sit on top of your soil. They dissolve over time and provide the best long-lasting energy option for lawns.

Water in the Morning - Fertilizer applications need moisture to work best. Watering your lawn in the spring may seem counterintuitive given the rainfall that some climates receive, but watering your lawn regularly is essential to help the grass grow strong. Consider watering your yard in the morning before 10 a.m., as this will allow the lawn time to soak up the water and dry out under the afternoon sun. Watering in the evening or at night may seem smart, but it can actually cause lawn care problems such as disease and fungi.

Ease Into Mowing - While your lawn may have grown a little throughout the winter depending on your location, lawns need some time to ease into the spring. Refrain from mowing your lawn on a low setting as temperatures go up. Short lawns expose the root system, which can create a stressful situation for the grass. Consider doing a light mow early on in the season to take off the tips of the blades. Doing so will ease your lawn back into the growing season and will help keep it looking great.

Start Fighting Weeds - Homeowners looking to put their home on the market should combat any weeds in their lawn. There are many weed and feed chemicals to help prevent weeds. These mixes often include different fertilizers, so be sure to read the directions so that you don't give your lawn too much. Locate any problem areas in your yard and consider applying weed control to those areas, as well.

Seed Thin Spots - It's common for bare spots to appear after a long winter. Immediately care for areas of the lawn that have thinned or are completely bare. These spots can cause problems, not only with weed growth, but also in presenting a beautiful lawn to a prospective buyer. Rake out these spots in your yard and apply a good amount of seed. Give these spots extra water a few weeks after you seed them to encourage new grass roots to take hold.

There are many ways to help your lawn come back after a long winter. Mow the grass on a high setting until it has had time to recover, fertilize and water the lawn to boost growth, and be sure to keep weeds away by using preventive measures. Follow all the tips listed above and your lawn will be back to its former glory in no time.

When you are not working on your yard, here are some Fun early spring activity recommendations in the Salt Lake area from KSL. Here are some recommendations to take advantage of the improving weather, no matter if it is in your town or the mountains.

Go on a low elevation hike. The sun is higher in the sky, melting the snow at lower elevations. These locations are mostly snow-free and conveniently located near the valley floors.

  • The Bonneville Shoreline Trail: Following the shoreline of the now dried-up Lake Bonneville, you can easily do a small section of this trail from one of these convenient access points (the trail extends for over 100 miles along the Wasatch Front).
  • Ensign Peak: This short climb above downtown and Capitol Hill affords beautiful views of the city and surrounding mountains.
  • Antelope Island State Park: Besides breathtaking views of the Great Salt Lake and desert landscapes that are uniquely Utahn, the park features excellent access to wildlife, including large animals like bison and, its namesake, the antelope. Antelope Island State Park is about a 1-hour drive north of Salt Lake City and has a $10-per-vehicle access fee.
See the sights. Explore these cultural, historical, and entertaining sites that Salt Lake City has on offer.
  • Temple Square: Located in the historic center of Salt Lake City, there are so many things to do at Temple Square you may need to visit more than once. Among other activities, this destination features tours, activities specifically for kids, the world’s largest genealogical library, and free performances by The Tabernacle Choir. You won’t be bored and admission is free.
  • Liberty Park and the Tracy Aviary: Located minutes from downtown, Liberty Park features great walking paths, playgrounds for children, and the Tracy Aviary. The aviary features daily events like live bird feedings and bird species from condors to colorful macaws. Liberty Park is free to access and daily admission to the aviary costs $11.95 for adults and $7.95 for children.
Other resources for activities. If none of these activities pique your interest, these online resources offer a virtual treasure trove of ideas.

Visitsaltlake.com: If you are looking to stay close to Salt Lake City, this website showcases dozens of activities in the area.

Visitutah.com: This Utah Office of Tourism website features some of the major attractions and adventures throughout the state.

Timeout.com: This website offers a list of 11 bona fide activities in Utah.

If you missed reading the First Quarter Market Review last week - CLICK HERE to view our electronic version.

No alt text provided for this image

2019 First Quarter Market Review

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Apr 23, 2019

This week we have the first quarter Market Review for the Wasatch Back, local market reports for the Park City area and a little update on our record snowfall season!

The snow around town may almost be gone except for on the mountain tops and Ski Utah shares that the 2018-2019 season has been one of Utah’s snowiest on record. Every ski resort in the state recorded above-normal snowfall for the season. Every watershed basin in the state is at 135% of average or higher. Some areas, such as southwest Utah, are more than double the average snowpack! On average, we are 162% of median snowpack for this date and have received more than double the snowfall of the 2017-18 season. We are even challenging the great 2010-11 winter, in which Utah shattered all previous snowfall records.

While the numbers are impressive, what might be even more remarkable is the consistency of the snowfall. Alta Ski Area, which has currently seen 616” of snow on the season, has reported fresh snow on 91 separate days since November 1st. That’s out of a possible 171 days (as of April 20th). That means that Alta has received fresh snow on greater than 53% of ski days since the start of the season!

Elsewhere, each of the other resorts in the Cottonwood Canyons (Brighton and Snowbird) have likewise seen greater than 600” of snowfall for the season. Solitude Mountain Resort falls just over 500" for the season. Farther north, Snowbasin Resort had its snowiest winter in years and has thus far reported 429” of snow, including one of its snowiest February months on record. In southern Utah, Brian Head Ski Resortand Eagle Point both recorded seasonal snowfall more than 50% above average. Skiers, snowboarders and snow-lovers can all rejoice! This has been a truly remarkable season – one that will be remembered by many of us for years to come. Utah has once again lived up to its billing as The Greatest Snow on Earth.  While many resorts are closing, Snowbird will likely remain open into June. You can find a full list of closing dates here.

The First Quarter 2019 Market Review is now available! Click here for the entire report.

 

Next we have the most recent market reports for Upper and Lower Deer Valley, Old Town, Empire Pass, Deer Crest and the Canyons.

 

 

  1. Keep working ,fantastic job!

What Baby Boomers Want

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Apr 15, 2019

The National Association of Home Builders has shared the Top 10 Home Features Baby Boomers Want — and Don’t Want - Much like the average home buyer, buyers in the baby boomer generation like laundry rooms and energy efficiency, and dislike elevators and wine cellars. Baby boomers, however, tend to have stronger opinions about what they do and do not want in their homes, as indicated in NAHB’s recent update on What Home Buyers Really Want.

The 2019 edition is based on a survey of 3,996 home buyers, both recent (purchased a home in the last three years) and prospective (expecting to buy a home in the next three years). Respondents rated 175 features on the following four-tier scale: Essential: Unlikely to buy a home without feature, Desirable: Seriously influenced to buy home if included, Indifferent: Would not influence purchase decision, and Do Not Want: Not likely to buy a home with feature.

No. 1 is a laundry room, which 94% of baby boomers want. Baby boomers are more likely to indicate what they want (based on higher essential/desirable percentages noted in the chart), and a full bath on the main level (displacing a double kitchen sink).

An elevator is the feature baby boomers are least likely to want, as 80% of baby boomers are looking to purchase single-story homes. It’s important to remember, however, that a niche market usually exists even among the most generally unwanted items; in this case, 10% of baby boomers consider an elevator desirable, and 3% think it’s essential.

With the most undesirable features, baby boomers again paralleled the interests of the general home buyer population. The biggest difference is that a two-story family room ranks fourth on the unwanted list for baby boomers, compared to ninth for all buyers. In every case, though, the share of baby boomers who explicitly reject the feature is at least 5 percentage points higher.

Baby boomers also ranked their most desired community features: Near retail space (72% ranked essential or desirable), Walking/jogging trails (66%), Typically suburban (65%), Walkable community (62%) and Park area (61%).

For inspiring 55+ development ideas, visit the recently updated Best of 55+ Housing Awards website.

With those stats in mind, Apartment Therapy has shared the 9 Ways to Boost Your Home’s Curb Appeal, According to Real Estate Experts. When it comes to curb appeal, doesn’t it seem like everyone talks only about painting your door a bright color and manicuring your front yard? Here, some of the best tips, from real estate professionals.

1. Don’t just focus on shrubs and flowers - “You want to make sure that all of the boundaries between any concrete, grass, and flowerbeds are crisp and clean,” says Brett Jennings, founder of Real Estate Experts, a real estate company in Southern California. “This makes a big difference between a messy front yard and an organized one.”

2. Do more than a light spring clean - By power washing the siding, windows, and entire exterior of your home, you’ll get rid of years of dirt and debris and give your façade an upgrade. “This is important because the vast majority of buyers who don’t like the exterior of a home won’t even look at the interior, no matter how great it is,” says Bruce Ailion, a Realtor in Atlanta, Georgia.

3. Make sure potential buyers can find your home - It seems obvious but a house number—in an updated font—can make or break the look of your home. “Make sure your address number can be read from the street,” says Justin Riordan, founder of Spade and Archer Design Agency, a home staging company in Portland, Oregon. “If your house is hard to find, people will leave without buying. Also, your address numbers need to be in a contrasting color and it should be well-lit so it can be easily read from the street both day and night.”

4. Show your screen door the door - “I have never seen a screen door that was better-looking than the door behind it,” Riordan says. “The screen door also can make for an awkward entry sequence when attempting to get the key out of the lockbox while holding the screen door open.”

5. Upgrade your mailbox - “If your mailbox is looking a little rusty and if you want your home to look a little more glamorous, this is the perfect opportunity to replace it with a newer, more stylish option,” says Sophie Kaemmerle, a home improvement expert at Neighbor Who.

6. Play with night lights - “Your house may look its best during the day, but don’t forget to make sure it looks as good at night,” Kaemmerle says. “The right lighting can create the ambiance you want and even show off all of your home’s best features.”

7. Add window boxes or planters - “Even if you don’t have a big yard, you can amplify your windows and the look of your home’s front exterior by adding flowers below your windows,” Kaemmerle says. “This can drastically change the look of your home, thanks to the pop of color they can provide. You don’t have to have them at every window—even just one or two may be sufficient to drastically ramp up your curb appeal.”

8. See your front door as a design statement - “The front door says a lot about a home and its owner,” says Smitha Ramchandani, president of SR Real Estate Group in New Jersey. “When choosing a color, consider the style of your home. Perhaps a stately black or hunter green might appeal to buyers with traditional tastes or maybe you want something more laid-back like a canary yellow, which telegraphs cheer and comfort.”

9. Make sure your home exudes warmth - “You want to aim for a homey look when you’re working on curb appeal so avoid obscuring the interior with opaque or blackout curtains if you don’t need to or at least keep them drawn to the side for showings,” Ramchandani says. “Or, put a plant in a first-floor window. Just one works to add a homey touch. Remember: A home that looks open looks more inviting to a potential buyer.”

Solar is also an option for a household upgrade as KUTV reports that Salt Lake City ranskn11th nationwide for solar energy. According to a recent report conducted by the Environment America Research & Policy Center, Salt Lake City is ranked 11th nationwide for solar energy per capita, putting the state capital among the nation's top solar energy leaders. The results came from "Shining Cities 2019: The Top U.S. Cities for Solar Energy" - a comprehensible survey that monitors installed solar capacity across the country. Salt Lake City’s use of solar energy sets an example for the rest of the country.

According to the report, Salt Lake was ranked ahead of Los Angeles and behind Albuquerque, New Mexico, for megawatts of solar energy per capita as of year-end 2018. Salt Lake City uses solar energy to protect public health by combating local air pollution and reduce global warming emissions as part of the city's commitment to achieving 100% renewable electricity citywide by 2032, stated the press release.

“We are thrilled to see Salt Lake City listed among the solar energy leaders in Shining Cities,” stated Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski in the press release. “Sustained development of solar resources is an essential pillar of our efforts to address climate change. Powering homes and businesses with clean, renewable energy creates jobs, reduces pollution, and offers stable electricity rates. I’m proud to see so many of our community members invest in a clean energy future.”

In addition to the national rankings, the report examined national solar power in major cities over the course of six years. According to the report, solar energy capacity has more than doubled in 45 of 57 of the country's largest cities and it has more than quadrupled in Salt Lake City from 2013 to 2018. “Each year we harness more and more of the enormous solar energy potential across the country,” stated Searson. “We still have a long way to go, but leaders like Mayor Biskupski are taking the steps necessary to power more homes, schools and businesses with clean energy from the sun.”

Vacation Homes

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Apr 03, 2019

The great thing about Park City is that even when you are working you still feel like you are on vacation. Bloomberg has released The Best Places to Own a Vacation Home in the U.S. and Park City tops the list - Aspen and Jackson Hole might be the first ski spots that come to mind when considering a vacation at a luxurious mountain resort. But if you’re actually looking to buy a home and care about convenience as well as luxury, then Utah’s Summit Park region may be the best option. Summit Park -- the term for the micropolitan area -- ranked highest on Bloomberg’s Wealthiest U.S. Vacation Havens Index. The area is home to the Park City, Silver Summit and Deer Valley resorts.

Bloomberg looked for small pockets of wealth in more than 500 areas across four equally weighted metrics: vacation home stock, share of the workforce employed in real estate and recreation-related industries, home valuations and household income. The final index is comprised of 70 micropolitan statistical areas. A micropolitan statistical area includes one main urban center with a population of at least 10,000 but fewer than 50,000 people, at least one county and all designated hamlets, villages and townships.

In Summit County, the average sale price of a single-family home was close to $1.6 million in 2018, according to data from Sotheby’s International Realty. Within Summit County’s Park City limits, the average sale price was even higher at $2.7 million.

"The Park City area offers a very wide range of home options, but increasingly moderately priced housing is being displaced as home prices are bid up in prime locations," said Bill Ligety, associate broker at Summit Sotheby’s International Realty and a 40-year Park City resident.

Home prices within the Deer Valley Resort -- less than three miles from the Park City slopes -- are even more extravagant. The average sale price in Upper Deer Valley, the older and more historic portion, was $5.4 million last year. In the newer area, dubbed Deer Crest, the average was $6.5 million. The St. Regis hotel is located in this neighborhood.

Nearly 20 percent of households in Summit Park earned $200,000 in 2017, the highest of all micro areas. But that figure could be higher because a share of people who own vacation homes have a primary residence at a different location where they would report their income.

Two micro areas in Colorado -- Edwards and Breckenridge -- landed at No. 2 and No. 3, respectively. Ski resorts in those areas include Vail, Breckenridge, Copper, Beaver Creek and Keystone. The micro area in and around Jackson Hole was ranked No. 4.

Looking to start a business in Utah or already have one, well The best and worst US states to start a business (by Yahoo Fianance)- ranks Utah the #2 state to start a business. Texas is the best state to start your own business and Hawaii is the worst, according to a study from WalletHub. The personal finance site analyzed data from a variety of sources — including the U.S. Department of Labor and Statistics, the U.S. Census Bureau — and found that the top five states to start a business were Texas, Utah, Georgia, Montana, and Oklahoma. The bottom five were Pennsylvania, Vermont, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, and Hawaii.

The study factored in the business environment, access to resources, and business costs as part of their findings. It also considered aspects including educated populations, total spending incentives as a percentage of GDP, and the availability of human capital. North Dakota (#7) and Utah (#2) are the top states for highest average growth in the number of small businesses and most accessible financing. Alaska (#36) is the top state for the highest availability of human capital and longest average work week (in hours). Iowa (#39) has the cheapest office spaces while West Virginia (#45) and Michigan (#15) are tied for highest total spending on incentives as a percentage of GDP.

Last month we looked at Utah being a great place for retirees, well the Most Popular Cities for Millennials to Call Home (by Realtor Magazine) is also Utah - Millennials are choosing to plant roots in Salt Lake City, Minneapolis, and Pittsburgh at higher rates than in any other of the nation’s 50 largest metro areas, according to a new report by online marketplace LendingTree, which analyzed mortgage requests from January to November. “While millennials are often stereotyped as adolescents, the reality is that this generation is well into adulthood, with most between their early 20s and mid-30s,” according to the study. “This means that many of them are actively pursuing careers, having children, and buying homes.”

In Salt Lake City, millennials made the majority of total purchase requests—51 percent—between Jan. 1 and Nov. 25 this year. In Minneapolis and Pittsburgh, the percentage was 48 percent, according to the study. On the other hand, the fewest mortgage requests from millennials during the same time period were in Tampa, Fla., Las Vegas, and Miami. Only 30 percent of purchase requests in Tampa came from millennials. Tampa represents the lowest share of millennial mortgage requests among the 50 largest metro areas analyzed.

Market Review

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Mar 26, 2019

This week we have the current market reports as well as some of the events going on in Park City.

What's HAPPENING in Park City:

SPRING GRÜV - Park City Mountain’s 16-day festival returns with live music, s’mores parties, Pink Park City (a fundraiser to benefit cancer research), Easter celebrations, and the 23rd Annual Pond Skimming Contest. A fun way to celebrate the beginning of spring, Spring Grüv is a fun event for the entire family. Spring Grüv kicks has started and runs through April 7th. For a detailed event calendar, visit Park City Mountain’s website.

WATCH MAMA MIA AT THE EGYPTIAN THEATER - The jukebox musical romantic comedy that has delighted audiences worldwide featuring the songs from the Swedish pop group, ABBA! Shows will be running from March 22nd through March 31st. For detailed event calendar, click here.

Get your last ski days in - representatives from Deer Valley Resort and Park City Mountain Resort say the ski areas remain set on their closing date of April 7, just two weeks away. The closing of the resorts early in the month will likely have a significant impact on Park City businesses, as lodging numbers are expected to plummet after the first week of April.

 

Market Report & News

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Feb 12, 2019

This week we will start off with a handful of market reports (Lower Deer Valley, Upper Deer Valley, Empire Pass, Old Town and Canyons) and then follow up with Kid and Parent approved eateries in Park City and the best terrain parks in North America. Please let us know if you have any questions on our reports or fun activities in Park City.

 

 

 

Larger images of these reports are available on our LinkedIn site or we can send them to you directly by reaching out to ramon@rgomzjr.com

Park City Magazine has shared 8 Kid- and Parent-Approved Eateries in Park City with Kid-friendly menus, fast service, and a casual atmosphere prevail at these family-friendly restaurants. Casual atmosphere, a menu with lots of variety, and craft beer make Wasatch a winner for the whole family.

Baja Cantina - It might not be the most authentic Mexican food, but Baja Cantina (1355 Lowell Ave) is a no-brainer for après-ski munchies or dinner, particularly if you’re looking for a convenient location near Park City Mountain’s base area. Load up on generous portions of chips, salsa, tacos, and other Tex-Mex specials—and for the adults, margaritas, of course.

The Corner Store Pub & Grill - Unwind after a day on the slopes at a longtime local fixture. You’ll always find a mix of visitors and local regulars partaking in the après scene at The Corner Store (1325 Lowell Ave) thanks to $3 PBRs and tasty, reasonably-priced grub. During their round of renovations this summer, the eatery installed two new pizza ovens meaning those $6 slices ($4 for locals) are being served faster than ever. The joint also gets bonus points for prime people-watching patio seating, perfect for those sunnier winter days.

Davanza’s  - If you’ve got a mind to skip out on the pricey fare of the mountain and you’re at least an intermediate skier or rider, cruise down Quit-N-Time run at Park City Mountain and pop into Davanza’s (690 Park Ave, 435.649.222). With walls lined with hundreds of beer cans, this down-to-earth Park City hangout serves up burgers, subs, street tacos, and pizza on the cheap. Hop back on Town Lift and you’re ready for more action.

Red Tail Grill - Just steps from Park City Mountain’s Orange Bubble Express, the Red Tail Grill (4000 Canyons Resort Dr) offers fantastic views of the slopes with your lunch or dinner. Their special kid’s menu includes no-fuss cheese burgers, spaghetti, and chicken fingers, while adults can choose from a more sophisticated selection of entrées, hand-crafted cocktails, and draft beers.

Wasatch Brew Pub - Most restaurants on Main Street do their best to accommodate families with kids. But, if we have to pick the best place for a family outing, Wasatch Brew Pub (250 Main St) is it. With a long list of award-winning beers and a food menu that covers everything from tater-tots and loaded mac-n-cheese to seared ahi tuna, superfood salads, and savory burgers, this restaurant has something to tickle everyone’s fancy.

Squatters Roadhouse & Grill - Another excellent choice (just ask our editor’s kids!) for a laid-back dining experience is Squatters Roadhouse & Grill (1900 Park Avenue). Serving breakfast, lunch, or dinner, Squatters expansive menu offers a little bit of everything, from biscuits and gravy to tacos, curry, pizza, burgers, and beyond.

Daly’s Pub & Rec - Located inside the Montage Deer Valley, Daly’s Pub & Rec (9100 Marsac Ave) is a winner for all ages. This upscale-pub-meets-tricked-out-game-room offers guests a little competition with their meal through vintage arcade games, shuffleboard, bowling, and darts. Menu items range from kid-pleasers like chicken tenders and mac-n-cheese to artisanal pizzas, Wagyu steak, wild mushroom risotto, and salads.

Champions Club - Part of this summer’s $14 million property enhancements, Stein Eriksen Lodge (7700 Stein Way) recently unveiled the shiny new 3,500-square foot Champions Club. The entertainment center—with high-tech interactive games as well as retro arcade favorites—offers a casual, family-friendly place to grab a bite and beverage. Best of all, you can ski in and ski out easily from the adjacent Champions Club Plaza. Parents may opt for sidling up to the plaza’s fire pits with a glass of vino, while the rest of the clan heads into the club for billiards or, perhaps, Pac-Man.

Adventure Sports Network has listed the 6 of the Best Terrain Parks in North America and Park City makes the list. From massive hits to inventive jib features, these are the resorts doing terrain parks right. It wasn’t long ago that terrain parks were an exotic beast – a place where adventurous skiers and snowboarders could spend time testing gravity and sliding their boards and skis down the occasional hand rail.

Nowadays, terrain parks are all but a required part of any mountain resort, a prerequisite for visitors from near or far. With such a variety of options, it can be hard to separate the real from the pretender, especially when the kickers get bigger and rail setups a little spicier.

Park City Mountain, Utah - If you've seen an insane terrain park edit in the last few years, chances are pretty good that you’ve already seen Park City Mountain's terrain parks in action. Perfectly shaped step-downs and some of the biggest, most creative rail setups in North America are just a few of the factors that draw some of the most talented skiers and riders (and their filmers) to the sunny slopes of Park City Mountain.

But Park City isn’t just for the pros. In fact, the area has a diverse progression of parks, from its kid parks to more intermediate Pick Axe Park.

Park City nearly doubled its freestyle terrain after merging with the former Canyons Resort, offering eight terrain parks and two halfpipes.

FIS Championships and Real Estate Updates

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Feb 05, 2019

This week we wanted to share what is happening in Park City in the midst of the FIS World Championships, what states are growing the fastest in the US and which home improvements have the highest return on investment in 2019.

The FIS World Championships bring in over 1,500 athletes to compete in aerials, SX snowboardcross and skicross, and moguls. The Park Record shares that Aerials, one of the original freestyle events, is also flying into new territory. On Feb. 7, athletes will compete in the World Championship debut of team aerials at Deer Valley Resort's Owl Run.

The traditional aerials finals are scheduled for Feb. 6 on the same course. Both events are judged, in which athletes fly off high-angle jumps to complete multiple spins and flips in a single jump. Snowboardcross and Skicross, in which groups of athletes race down a course that features drops, ramps and jumps, made their Olympic debuts in 2006 and 2010 respectively.

Deer Valley's World Cups are marked as a high point in the moguls season among athletes because of the quality of course and accommodations as well as the tight-knit corps of volunteers that run the competition. Moguls is both a timed and judged sport. Athletes are judged on their skiing technique and the tricks they perform off of two jumps, which is added to their timed run down the slope. Spectators can see that course from the same area as the aerials competition. For more information and a detailed schedule of events, go to 2019worldchamps.com.

Western States Fare Best in Population Growth - Which states are growing the fastest and adding new residents? Idaho and Nevada once again lead the states in population growth rates, according to the latest U.S. Census Bureau figures. Demographic changes can be key to projecting future housing needs, the National Association of Home Builders explained on its Eye On Housing blog post analyzing the census numbers. Between July 1, 2017, to July 1, 2018, Nevada posted a population growth rate of 2.09 percent, while Idaho grew by 2.05 percent. The other three of the five fastest-growing states: Utah, Arizona, and Florida.

However, Texas had the largest increase in its population by number—adding 379,128 people between July 1, 2017, and July 1, 2018. Florida, California, Arizona, and North Carolina followed with the largest numerical increases to their populations. New York and Illinois posted the largest declines in population during that time period. Overall, the U.S. population increased by 2 million between July 1, 2017, and July 1, 2018. The U.S. population now stands at 327.2 million.

Cost vs. Value: The Home Improvement Projects With the Highest ROI in 2019 Remodelers across the country took a hit last summer as the cost of building materials spiked dramatically, and the picture for 2019 isn't much rosier. The percentage of return on investment (ROI) is projected to trend downward for all the replacement projects listed in Remodeling magazine's newly-released Cost vs. Value Report.

Larger indoor remodel projects took a hit as well, but weren't impacted as greatly as replacement projects as they rely more on labor costs rather than material costs.

"With the increasing costs of building materials and labor, we urge remodelers to think like real estate professionals first,” says Clayton DeKorne, editor-in-chief of Remodeling magazine. "When you adjust your focus to think like a broker first, you can dull clients’ No. 1 pain point—cost—with a discussion of the amount that can be recouped."

Nationally, here are the five projects with the greatest ROI in the report's mid-range cost category:

Manufactured Stone Veneer(94.9% ROI)

  • Average Cost: $8,907
  • Average Resale Value: $8,449
Minor Kitchen Remodel(80.5% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $22,507
  • Average Resale Value: $18,123
Deck Addition (Wood)(75.6% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $13,333
  • Average Resale Value: $10,083
Siding Replacement(75.6% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $16,036
  • Average Resale Value: $12,119
Entry Door Replacement (Steel)(74.9% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $1,826
  • Average Resale Value: $1,368
And the five projects with the greatest ROI in the report's upscale cost category are:

Garage Door Replacement(97.5% ROI)

  • Average Cost: $3,611
  • Average Resale Value: $3,520
Window Replacement (Vinyl)(73.4% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $16,802
  • Average Resale Value: $12,332
Grand Entrance (Fiberglass)(71.9% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $8,994
  • Average Resale Value: $6,469
Window Replacement (Wood)(70.8% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $20,526
  • Average Resale Value: $14,530
Bathroom Remodel(60.2% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $64,743
  • Average Resale Value: $38,952
Nationally—and on the other end of the spectrum—here are the five projects with the lowest ROI in the mid-range cost category:

Backyard Patio(55.2% ROI)

  • Average Cost: $56,906
  • Average Resale Value: $31,430
Master Suite Addition(59.4% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $130,986
  • Average Resale Value: $77,785
Bathroom Addition(60.6% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $47,427
  • Average Resale Value: $28,726
Roofing Replacement (Metal)(60.9% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $38,600
  • Average Resale Value: $23,526
Major Kitchen Remodel(62.1% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $66,196
  • Average Resale Value: $41,133
And the five projects with the lowest ROI in the upscale cost category are:

Master Suite Addition(50.4% ROI)

  • Average Cost: $271,470
  • Average Resale Value: $136,820
Bathroom Addition(58.1% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $87,704
  • Average Resale Value: $51,000
Major Kitchen Remodel(59.7% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $131,510
  • Average Resale Value: $78,524
Bathroom Remodel(60.2% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $64,743
  • Average Resale Value: $38,952
Window Replacement (Wood)(70.8% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $20,526
  • Average Resale Value: $14,530
  • The 2019 Cost vs. Value Report surveyed more than 3,200 real estate professionals about returns for 22 popular renovation projects in 136 different U.S. housing markets—up from 100 markets last year. View the full report, including project descriptions and city-level data, here.

  1. Wonderful article! This is the kind of info that are supposed to be shared around the web. Disgrace on Google for now not positioning this put up upper! Come on over and seek advice from my website . Thank you =)

  2. Thanks for finally writing about >FIS Championships and Real Estate Updates - Realtor Ramon In Park City Blog <Loved it!

  3. whoah this weblog is great i love studying your articles.

    Keep up the good work! You realize, lots of individuals are searching around for this info, you could aid them greatly.

  4. I am regular reader, how are you everybody? This piece of writing posted at this web page is really nice.

  5. Excellent post. I was checking constantly this blog and I'm impressed! Very useful info specifically the last part :) I care for such information much. I was looking for this particular information for a long time. Thank you and good luck.

  6. What's up, just wanted to say, I enjoyed this blog post. It was inspiring. Keep on posting!

Staying Warm

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jan 29, 2019

The winter cold is here as well as across the country with temperatures well below freezing. This week we wanted to share the 4th Quarter review, along with some ways to save on your heating bill and how to pack for mountain travel.

Real Estate update: Check out Gino's Market Update for the Q4 Market Update with Gino Blefari.

6 Ways to Save on Your Heating Bill This Winter - Whether you have an economical heat pump or a decades-old oil burner, you're probably looking for a way to cut your heating costs this winter. It's totally easy to keep warm (and on budget) with these expert tips:

You can't manage what you don't measure - The first step to managing your energy spending is inspecting it, says Josh Prigge, founder of Sustridge, a sustainability consulting firm in Las Vegas, Nevada. For most people, that means checking your electric bill. For others, it might mean calculating how many gallons of oil you've used (we see you Northeasterners) or how much you've spent each month on ancillary heating items (i.e. pellets for a pellet stove or wood for your fireplace.) Once you know where your money is going, you can come up with realistic use goals and monitor your progress against them.

Knowing your home's perfect temperature - To save money on your energy bills, set your thermostat to 65 degrees Fahrenheit. If that sounds a little too cold, being a little chilly may seem like a fair trade for all you'll save—that for every degree you lower your thermostat, you'll save approximately two percent of your overall heating bill.

Upgrade your technology - Affordable smart home devices can do wonders in reducing your overall energy use. A web-connected thermostat can be fiddled with from anywhere in the world, via your phone, which means you can lower your home's temperature after everyone has left for the day, says Steve Beeler, owner of RSC Heating and Air Conditioning. And don't forget to look for the Energy Star symbol on every home item you upgrade, from appliances to light bulbs. These use lower amounts of energy in the long term, which can mean lower bills (and more money in your pocket.)

Dodge those drafts - "Drafts are the largest source of heating and cooling loss in the home," says Mark Tyrol, the owner of Battic Door, a Mansfield, Massachusetts-based home energy conservation product company. Since warm air can escape and cold air can enter through poorly insulated areas, keeping them untouched is essentially like leaving your windows open all winter long.

Consider purchasing a cover for your house fan, a draft blocker for your dryer vent, a plug for your fireplace, and a cover for your attic stairs. Of course, cracks around your windows and doors, and pipes that run through exterior walls can leak your precious warm air out, too. Enter weatherstripping and added insulation: It can be as cheap as a rolled-up towel under a drafty door or a $13 window insulator kit.

Hot tip: Once your windows are well-insulated, consider keeping the curtains open to let the sunlight in. The added heat from the sunshine may have a big impact in small rooms.

Don't forget to winterize - Hate to break it to you, but summer is over. Though it may seem like an added headache to swap out your storm windows and remove those air conditioning units (or covering them up if they're permanently installed), these small steps can save you some money, says Jordana Viuker Brennan, founder of Confident Buildings, a New York-based energy-use consultancy.

Perform routine maintenance - The biggest heating cost? That emergency repair session after your unit goes kaput. But, just like your grandma says, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

"If you invest 80 percent of the service work into preventative service, you will only need 20 percent or less in emergency work," says Dave Miller, the owner of South Carolina-based Superior Heating & Air.

Prevent the big messes with these small tasks: Replace your air filters every season (Miller suggests replacing them once a month to prevent the build up of particles in your heating system), have an HVAC specialist calibrate your thermostat, and occasionally pour a cap of bleach down your AC unit's drain line to prevent algae and other deposits from building up.

And remember: These steps save more than just costs—they could save your life as well. Regular maintenance of fuel-burning appliances (like your furnace, water heater, and clothes dryer), can prevent fires and carbon monoxide build-up, says Larry Oglesby, director of Remington College's HVAC program. Take the time this winter to make sure everything is property vented, so you can rest assured as you cozy up.

What to Pack for a Ski/Snowboarding Vacation by Ski Utah is a good reminder for us locals, but great to share with family and friends coming into town - Packing for a ski trip can be a challenge.  Most of the clothes are bulky and traveling with gear can be a hassle. Clothes make a difference between enjoying your trip and being miserable. For snow-play, leave the cotton at home and stick to wool or synthetic fabrics. Once cotton gets wet, from either sweat or snow, it won’t dry out, leaving you damp and cold.

In general, you want to pack pieces that can be mixed and matched to keep you warm and looking good. Mid layers are a good example of something you can wear on and off the slopes. However, you may want to pack separate base layers for snow sports and relaxing, because if you’re like me, the skiing set will get stinky during the day.

On the slopes

Base: Your base layer should be wool or synthetic. A mid- to heavy-weight is good depending on the rest of your gear. I wear a heavyweight Hot Chillys base with my ski pants and stayed toasty and warm without a mid layer. On top, I used a synthetic base plus a mid layer.

Mid: You may or may not need this layer depending on the rest of your gear. Fleece works well. On top, I use a zipped jacket or 1/4 zip that I can open when I get warm.

Outer: This includes your ski pants and jacket. Make sure this layer is waterproof, especially if you’re a beginning skier or rider, because you’ll spend a lot of time on your butt in the snow. Ski pants and jackets are insulated to varying degrees, which will influence which other layers you choose. My jacket isn’t insulated, so I really layer-up on top, sometimes using two light base layers and a mid layer underneath. My pants have some insulation built in so I only need the Hot Chillys bottoms.

If you don’t own, or want to pack, ski pants and coat, try using a rental service such as Jans.com. Simply order what you need online or stop in the store.

The important-small-stuff: In addition to your layers, on the slopes you’ll need gloves, ski goggles or sunglasses, a neck warmer such as a buff, cap, balaclava, or beanie that will fit under your helmet; and ski socks. Ski socks should be snuggly fitted and taller than regular socks making them a better choice with ski boots. Trust me; you don’t want socks bunching up inside of your ski boots, ouch! Hand and foot-warmers are a pleasure to have on really cold days. Buy them off the mountain for the best deal. Depending on the type of skiing you have planned, you may need a backpack and hydration options.

Off the slopes - You’ll be worn out by the end of the day, so pack some comfy clothes to relax in. Keep thinking in layers to give yourself more outfit options and save room. Again, they should include bases, mid-layers such as a snuggly fleece and an outer layer. The difference is that the outer layer doesn’t need to be waterproof and the other could include some cotton such as jeans.

Base: I like a thin bottom base, such as silk, under my pants. Sometimes I skip this and just wear one layer after hours if I won’t be outside much.

Mid: This is the piece you’ll likely wear the most, so choose something that will pair well with all of your outfits and that fits comfortably. There are so many sharp looking options available, it may be hard to choose just one, but for the sake of space, try.

Outer: This can be any stylish coat, sized to fit a couple of layers underneath. By using layers, you can avoid packing your biggest, most bulky coat. Pick something that is wind and rain resistant for the most versatility.

The important-small-stuff: Gloves, scarves and caps will round out your outfits without taking up much space. Make sure you pack some waterproof boots that can take a tromp through the snow. Sorel makes a bunch of options that get the job done while looking good. I didn’t feel like a Salt Lake City local until I owned a pair. Then I found out they make all-rubber high-heels, not my grandma’s idea of practical snow boots, but they rock!

And don’t forget… Pack all of your usual travel items such as toiletries, undergarments, swimsuit, and maybe some sweats for the hotel room. A few more items you shouldn’t forget: sunscreen, snacks, and lip balm with sunscreen. Sunscreen is very important due to the high elevation and reflection up from the snow. Make sure you protect your face and lips well.

Carry On - In a perfect world, there wouldn't be a need for stores that sell lost luggage...but bags DO get lost, treating travelers to an uncomfortable arrival. But you can plan for the worst. Pack a day's worth of basics in your carry on. First, pack any prescriptions or supplies that would be a disaster to go without. Next, pack a change of clothes, base layers, ski socks, water-resistant boots, coat, gloves, and cap. With this much, you could rent everything else you would need to ski/ride, plus be comfortable off the slopes until your bags catch up.

What about gear? You have a few options for gear. It can be a hassle to check your board, skis or poles on the airline for a short trip, so you might want to rent them. However, boots are an important piece that I would go ahead and pack. I’d also prefer my own helmet, which doesn’t take much space if you stuff it full of other items such as gloves and beanies.

Do research on rentals ahead of time, there are rental options both on and off the mountain that may even give you the chance to demo some new gear you’ve wanted to try. Some will even give you a discount for reserving online in advance. Short on time? Have all of your rentals delivered so you can get on the snow faster. Both Ski Butlers and Ski 'N See Delivery will bring gear directly to you.

If all of these new clothes and accessories sound expensive, read my post: Dressing for cold weather travel on a budget. Don’t be the person who shows up in jeans and ends up miserable two hours into the lesson. Make time to “beg, borrow or steal” some decent clothes so you can focus on learning to ski, not trying to stay warm and dry.

2030 Olympics

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Dec 19, 2018

Time Magazine has published that Salt Lake City got the green light to bid for the Winter Olympics — most likely for 2030 — in an attempt to bring the Games back to the city that hosted in 2002 and provided the backdrop for the U.S. winter team’s ascendance into an international powerhouse.

The U.S. Olympic Committee said Friday it was selecting Utah’s capital, which stood out as a predictable, slam-dunk pick in a process that also included Denver and Reno, Nevada.

With venues still in place — some of them upgraded — from the 2002 Games, Salt Lake claims it can host again at a lower cost than other candidates, which aligns with the International Olympic Committee’s new blueprint for the Games.

It’s almost a certain bet the bid will be for 2030, though the USOC left open the possibility of other dates. There are only two bidders for 2026: from Sweden and Italy, after voters in Calgary, Alberta, rejected a proposed bid.

The Ski Jumping FIS Cup starts today, December 18, at the Utah Olympic Park 3419 Olympic Pkwy and goes through December 20, 2018. Price: $10 at the gate or online at USAnordic.org - Come watch as athletes from the United States and around the world compete for the FIS Cup at Utah Olympic Park December 18-20. WEBSITE

Park City is in the top 10 again for USA Today's Readers Choice 2018 10 Best Ski Towns. Park City offers the feel of a historic Wild West mining town with the amenities of a world class ski resort. Main Street is lined with top-notch bars and restaurants, while the Sundance Film Festival each January is one of the hottest tickets in town. The U.S. Ski Team trains at Park City Mountain Resort, so you know the skiing is good.

Forbes released its annual listof the best states for business. Utah finished in second place, which is one spot higher than in 2017, according to Forbes.

  • The Qualtrics-SAP deal announced in November was one reason why Utah received such a bump, according to Forbes.
  • Utah businesses experience energy costs that are 15 percent lower than the national average.
  • The state has the highest employment growth over the last five years. Job gains are expected to rise 2.2 percent through 2022, according to the report.
We will wrap up this week's blog with a great article, Why Heber Valley is the perfect winter staycation destination. Heber Valley is only 45 minutes from downtown Salt Lake City and offers great family entertainment options:
  • Ice Castles - more than two acres in size with towering walls made with 2 million gallons of water.
  • Heber Valley Railroad - Utah's only historic railroad with on board entertainment and a beautiful scenic ride.
  • Outdoor Ice Skating - Utah's largest outdoor rink all while you enjoy the lights of Midway.
  • Tubing at Soldier Hollow - Longest tubing lanes and only tubing destination in northern Utah.
  • Soaking in a Geotherman Crater - enjoy 95 degree mineral water that comes from two miles below the earth's surface.
  • Snowmobiling - Wasatch County is Utah's snowmobiling capital, with more than 700 miles of trails (200 miles of groomed trails).
There are also comfortable and cozy accommodations with Best Western Plus, Daniels Summit Lodge, Homestead Resort and Zermatt Resort.

You can enjoy the local flavors at more than 30 restaurants including two new restaurants: Old Goat and Corner Restaurant.

Ski & Snowboard Championships

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 14, 2018

The U.S. Ski and Snowboard seeks hundreds to volunteer for largest ski competition in Park City since Olympics - It's about a month and a half until the 2019 FIS freeski, snowboard and freestyle World Championships kicks off with snowboard cross on Solitude Mountain on February 1st. Organizers expect the International Ski Federation event, which is set to take place at Deer Valley Resort, Park City Mountain Resort, and Solitude Mountain Resort, to be the largest winter sports event in the Park City area in terms of spectator turnout since the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The U.S. Ski and Snowboard is currently searching for more than 600 volunteers to help with the event.

The volunteers also get perks – they accumulate two day passes redeemable at any of the three resorts, for the first four shifts they work, which is the minimum, then two additional passes for each two additional shifts. They also get uniforms, like winter jackets, that serve as functional memorabilia from the event. To volunteer, go to 2019worldchamps.com

The U.S. is a massive, complex economy, and so too are the component economies of the 50 states that make up the whole. Business Insider combined six measures of labor-market and general economic health—unemployment rate, job growth, per-capita GDP, GDP growth, average weekly wages, and wage growth—to determine an overall score for each state's economy. The states (plus the District of Columbia) were then ranked.According to the report, Utah a top-10 economy, ranked 6th of 51. The state's Q1 2018 GDP growth rate of 3.2% was the second-highest, and its non-farm payroll job growth rate of 3.5% (between August 2017 and August 2018) was the highest in the country. View the full report here.

KSL recently shared the stories behind some of Utah's most unusual ski trail names - Utah is famous for its ski resorts, attracting people from all over the world. There are 14 ski resorts in Utah, with “10 world-class ski resorts within an hour radius of the Salt Lake airport,” according to Ski Utah. Some of the ski trails at the various resorts have unusual and interesting names and even more interesting back stories.

At Solitude Mountain Resort, you’ll find a black diamond run called Barrett’s Glade. The trail is named after Robert M. Barrett, who developed the ski resort after he made his fortune by uranium mining in Moab, according to the Solitude Mountain Resort website.

Snowbird Resort also has some interesting trail names and backstories, as reported by Ski Utah. Many of the trails were named after friends and family of Dick Bass. For instance, Silver Fox Trail was named after Bass’ partner, Ted Johnson, because he had premature gray hair and was nicknamed the "Silver Fox," Ski Utah stated.

Deer Valley Resort has followed the same tradition of naming ski runs after people. According to the International Skiing History Association, Stein’s Way is named after the late director of skiing at Deer Valley Resort Stein Eriksen. The founder of Deer Valley Resort, Edgar Stern, has his own run as well: Edgar’s Alley. Emily Summers, the senior communications manager for the Deer Valley Resort in Park City, said that 98 of Deer Valley Resort’s 103 ski runs are named after the original mining claims.

Third Quarter Market Review

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Oct 17, 2018

The third quarter report provides an overview of the Summit and Wasatch County real estate markets. We believe it’s important that our clients have access to information that facilitates thoughtful real estate decisions. The Park City market remains highly segmented. Our town, its neighborhoods and outlying areas differ significantly in terms of price, home type, features, and amenities. For example, while Park Meadows and Upper Deer Valley share the same zip code, average and median home prices in these two neighborhoods vary significantly. As Alterra has announced enhancements throughout Deer Valley® Resort (including the new Ikon Pass) and Vail Resorts® is continuing their commitment to Park City Mountain, focusing on upgrades throughout Canyons Village. We believe these factors will continue to drive our markets in a positive direction. Additionally, we anticipate significant activity in the Mayflower area over the coming years with positive benefits for our community. In the meantime, our clients continue to find numerous buying opportunities in Summit and Wasatch counties especially in the Heber Valley, Jordanelle, and East Summit County neighborhoods. Data interpretation, judgment, and historical context are key elements in making informed decisions: Contact us for guidance on navigating our marketplace.

Park City Proper - The heart of Park City spans from the world-class Deer Valley® Resort to the iconic white barn, McPolin Farm. Park City Proper includes the neighborhoods: Old Town, Thaynes Canyon, Deer Valley, Aerie, Prospector, and Park Meadows.

Snyderville Basin begins at the iconic white barn, McPolin Farm, off Highway 224 and includes the neighborhoods: The Canyons, The Colony, Sun Peak, Bear Hollow, Silver Springs, Old Ranch Road, Kimball, Pinebrook, Summit Park, Jeremy Ranch, Glenwild, Silver Creek, Trailside Park, Silver Creek, Promontory, and Quinn’s Junction.
Jordanelle is the picturesque area surrounding the Jordanelle Reservoir. Just minutes from Park City this area includes communities such as Hideout Canyon, Tuhaye, Victory Ranch, Soaring Hawk, and more.
Heber Valley - Open space and farmland encompass the scenic Heber Valley. This area features remarkable views of Mount Timpanogos and countless recreational opportunities. The Heber Valley includes the neighborhoods of Midway, Charleston, Provo Canyon, Heber, Daniel, and Timberlakes.
East Summit County - Known as the “Gateway to the Uintas,” the charming Kamas Valley within East Summit County boasts endless outdoor activities. The East Summit County area includes the neighborhoods of Woodland, Francis, Kamas, Marion, Oakley, Weber Canyon, Peoa, Browns Canyon, Wanship, Hoytsville, Coalville, Echo, and Henefer.

The Coolest Town In America

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Oct 03, 2018

Park City was named top 20 cities by Matador Network in The Coolest Towns in America 2018. With a population of 8,299 Park City’s 1800s western aesthetic attests to the town’s roots as a major mining center. Park City Resort opened in 1963 with a gondola running right from the town. Another big change came in 1981 when the Sundance Film Festival, started a couple years earlier in Salt Lake City, moved its location to Park City.

A few decades later, Park City has evolved into the coolest town in Utah, offering plenty of world-class restaurants and shops to meet the demand of skiers and the thousands of annual Sundance attendees. Even after the festival ends in early February, Park City has plenty to do. In winter, the Park City Mountain resort is now much larger while the upscale Deer Valley Resort is a five-minute drive up the road. Summer activities include everything from whitewater rafting to horseback riding, with much fairer temperatures than the desert landscape a few hours south.

Looking for some dining options - Park City Dine Around Brings High-Brow Fare at Low Prices by Salt Lake Magazine. Take advantage of Park City’s decadent food culture without the associated resort town pricing. The Park City Area Restaurant Association (PCARA) is hosting the sixth annual “Dine About” from Monday, October 1 through Sunday, October 14, so locals and fall visitors alike can experience some of the best cuisine Park City has to offer.

Two dozen participating restaurants will be offering diners seasonal menus with two-course lunches and three-course dinners at a great value: lunches are either $10 or $15, and dinners are $20 or $40. Dine Around restaurants include everything from fine Main Street’s fine dining establishments to resort après institutions to the town’s brew pubs. Café Terigo, Café Trio Park City, Chimayo, Deer Valley Grocery Café, Element Kitchen & Bakery, Firewood on Main, Flanagan’s on Main, Fletcher’s Park City, Grappa, Handle, Purple Sage, Red Rock Junction, Red Tail Grill, Riverhorse on Main, Riverhorse Provisions, Shabu, Silver Star Café, Squatters, Sushi Blue, The Brass Tag, tupelo, Twisted Fern, Versante and Wasatch Brew Pub will all be serving up special menus for Dine About. Visit the PCARA website for full event details, and use the special Dine Around code “STAYPC” for lodging discounts during the event when you visit the Stay Park City website.

Utah Business recently shared, Utah Is The Best State For Doing Business. Utah ranks number one in the US for job growth, enjoys consistently low unemployment rates, and a strong workforce. What’s at the heart of this success? Small business. The US Small Business Administration reports that Utah is home to over 277,000 small businesses that make up 99.3 percent of Utah companies and 57.3 percent of total employees in the state. Here are four areas that have been fundamental to Utah’s economic success:

A Strong & Educated Workforce - “Nothing is more important to businesses than having access to a qualified workforce,” says Val Hale, executive director of the Governor’s Office of Economic Development. “That is why so many companies choose to invest in education.” Utah’s public education systems, both K-12 and higher education, have a strong partnership with our business community.

Taxes & Regulation - Utah’s economy continues to benefit from our flat five percent personal and corporate tax rate, which is one of the lowest in the nation. Low taxes are important to small business but equally important is a stable tax rate. Utah small businesses have benefited from the predictability of the state’s flat tax throughout the 20 years since the rate was established. Additionally, the Governor’s office, state legislature, and the Salt Lake Chamber are always looking at ways to evaluate and eliminate unnecessary regulations.

Incentives - Incentivizing business creation and sustainable growth is key to Utah’s thriving small business ecosystem. Several state programs assist new and existing businesses: one is the business expansion and retention (BEAR) grants for small businesses in rural parts of the state. The Utah Science, Technology and Research (USTAR) initiative specifically assists start-up and early-stage tech companies, as well. The state also offers financial incentives for business relocation and expansion. This incentive program is built on three pillars that make it both effective and sustainable: 1) the business expansion must be competitive, 2) the incentives must be post-performance, and 3) the incentive must be a tax rebate once the jobs have been created and the corporate taxes are paid.

International Trade - You may have read recent headlines that trade is killing the US, that is not the case in Utah. Utah is a trade surplus state to the tune of $4 billion annually and has doubled its exports over the past decade with a goal to double exports again over the next ten years. This is a credit to the 3,500 plus companies that export, nearly 85 percent of which are small businesses.

Buying In Fall

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Sep 18, 2018

Fall’s arrival presents opportunities for homebuyers, in part due to a “back-to-school mentality,” according to a survey by ERA Real Estate. If you’re a prospective homebuyer, tap into that renewed sense of motivation – and consider the following perks – while hunting for a home this fall.

You can enjoy year-end tax breaks. Buying before the year’s out allows fall homebuyers to take advantage of tax breaks such as the mortgage interest and property tax deductions. You can sidestep the multiple-bid minefield. Bidding wars dominated low inventory markets this summer, but competition tends to wane as activity slows in the fall. With fewer folks searching for homes, fall homebuyers can spend less time chasing supply and more time finding – and getting – the perfect home. You may have more bargaining power. Aside from less competition, fall homebuyers may have the opportunity to purchase their home of choice at a reduced price, especially when negotiating with sellers who had hoped to unload their homes over the summer. You’ll be home for the holidays – literally. As ERA reports in their survey, fall homebuying activity is also fueled by emotional motivation. “As vacations wind down after Labor Day and people become more focused, the desire to be in a new home for the holidays is a historically strong driver of fall home sales,” says ERA President and CEO Charlie Young.

Looking to move to Park City, well check out How To Make The Move To Park City, Utah recently posted in Forbes. Of course, uprooting your family and moving from an urban center, where you probably have family roots and a career or business network built over many years, is no easy decision. But, if you value the mountain lifestyle, though, it's well worth the effort to explore the idea. Here is their three-step guide to making it happen.

1. Take Some Vacations - Before you even broach the topic with your family, plan a couple vacations to Park City. See what it's like to live there for a week or so, while you ski, bike, golf or just relax by the pool. (Include both winter and summer trips)

2. Live in Park City for One Year - Plan to rent a house for a year, starting and ending in the summer.

3. Buy a Vacation Property - If you can't swing a full move, then a vacation property gets you part way there. Eventually, the vacation home becomes permanent.

IN THE NEWS - Utah named 2nd happiest state in U.S. Happiness can come from a number of different sources, and those sources can vary between each person. According to a recent study by the National Academy of Sciences of the United States, one thing that does not create happiness is money. Happiness will only increase with wealth up to an annual income of $75,000. But, happiness can increase depending on where a person decides to live.

In a study by WalletHub, Utah is named as the second happiest state in the country. This placement was determined by a number of factors, including: Suicide rate, sports participation, employment, work hours, growth, income, divorce rate and more. Utah ranked No. 1 in sports participation and volunteer hours. The Beehive State placed in the bottom 10 for suicide rates. It also has the lowest divorce rate and has work hours compared to the other 49 states of America. Utah ranked fourth in safety and fifth in highest income growth.

Based on these rankings, Utah was placed second, just behind Hawaii, as the happiest state in the United States.

List of happiest states in America:

  1. Hawaii
  2. Utah
  3. Minnesota
  4. North Dakota
  5. California
  6. Idaho
  7. Maryland
  8. Iowa
  9. South Dakota
  10. Nebraska
  11. Wisconsin
  12. Connecticut
  13. New Jersey
  14. New York
  15. Virginia
  16. Massachusetts
  17. Washington
  18. Colorado
  19. Georgia
  20. North Carolina
  21. Arizona
  22. Texas
  23. Illinois
  24. New Hampshire
  25. Kansas
  26. Nevada
  27. Delaware
  28. Montana
  29. Florida
  30. Pennsylvania
  31. Rhode Island
  32. Indiana
  33. Maine
  34. Michigan
  35. Wyoming
  36. South Carolina
  37. Ohio
  38. Vermont
  39. Oregon
  40. Tennessee
  41. New Mexico
  42. Missouri
  43. Mississippi
  44. Kentucky
  45. Alabama
  46. Oklahoma
  47. Alaska
  48. Louisiana
  49. Arkansas
  50. West Virginia

 
 
Existing user sign in: 
Forgot Password?