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Hiking, Stretching and House Hunting

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 13, 2019

This week we are looking at a few great autumn hikes in the Salt Lake area, the importance of exercise & stretching coming into ski and snowboarding season and what to look for when buying a home during the colder months.

Here are Three Fall Hikes Near Salt Lake City - Take a gander at the mountainsides around Salt Lake City and you’ll see the reds and yellows starting to pop, which means only one thing: leaf peeping season is officially here! As any seasoned leaf peeper will tell you, the vibrant hues are fleeting, so get out there while the getting’s good. These three fall hikes near Salt Lake City are perfect for getting up into the mountains and soaking in the fall colors before shoulder season’s mud and cold come to call.

Silver Lake to Bowhunter Loop at Deer Valley - Difficulty: Medium, Dogs: Permitted on-leash, Highlights: High-elevation meadow and views from Bowhunter Loop

Just a short drive up Interstate 80 is Park City, where you’ll be able to enjoy resort town access to trails and amenities without the typical crowds this time of year. This hike to the top of Deer Valley’s Bald Mountain starts at the resort’s mid-mountain Silver Lake Lodge, easing your trek to the high-altitude aspen trees a bit.

Drive past downtown Park City on Deer Valley Drive before heading up Marsac Ave. to the parking garage at Silver Lake Lodge. From there, access the Silver Lake trailhead just past the Homestake Express chairlift. Now for the hard part. Ascend nearly 1,300 feet through twisting, root-covered singletrack towards the top of Bald Mountain. You’ll pass through massive, golden aspen groves with periodic scenic overlooks over the Jordanelle Reservoir before reaching the the summit. From there, descend on the snaking Ontario Canyon trail through a field of crimson scrub oak into a high-mountain meadow will fall wildflowers. A short way further, take a left on the Bowhunter Loop. Complete a clockwise loop on the undulating trail before returning the way you came, up Ontario Canyon and down Silver Lake until you reach the lodge.

Broads Fork Trail in Big Cottonwood Canyon - Difficulty: Hard, Dogs: Not permitted, Highlights: 270-degree views of Dromedary, O’Sullivan and Twin Peaks

Upper Broads Fork is home to some serious alpine terrain, and along on the way, you’ll be treated to some gorgeous high-elevation forests, meadows and waterfalls. Start by driving up Big Cottonwood Canyon on UT 190 for four and a half miles and park just below the s-curve. The trailhead is just past the picnic area, where you’ll begin an ascent of more than 2,100 feet in just over two and a half miles. It’s common to see moose on the trail this time of year. Everyone loves posting moose pictures on social media, but be sure to give them ample distance.

While climbing the steep, heavily-forested trail, you’ll pass by a couple small falls before ultimately reaching your turnaround point in a rocky meadow with breathtaking views of the surrounding peaks. Some of the Wasatch’s most imposing mountains, including Dromedary, O’Sullivan and the Salt Lake Twins form an awe-inspiring natural cathedral. After you’ve had your fill of views, return the way you came back to the trailhead.

Ferguson Canyon to Overlook - Difficulty: Medium/Hard, Dogs: Permitted on-leash, Highlights: Overlook views of Salt Lake Valley

The trail up Ferguson Canyon rewards hikers with incredible views of the Salt Lake Valley and mountain cirques similar to those in the Cottonwood Canyons, but since it’s not part of the Salt Lake City Watershed you’re allowed to bring your four-legged companions along. The trailhead is located just past Big Cottonwood Canyon Road off of Wasatch Blvd. Take a left on Prospector Drive just past the 7-11, then an immediate right to continue on Prospector and finally a left on Timberline drive where the trailhead is. Start by heading up the gravel road past the water tank before heading straight up the canyon.

The trail rises some 1,500 vertical feet into the Twin Peaks Wilderness, and is lined with rock buttresses that are popular among rock climbing climbers. Thirsty pooches will appreciate several natural springs along the way. In about two miles, you’ll reach a rocky outcropping with expansive views back over the Salt Lake Valley. Most people will turn around here and head back down the way they came, though truly hearty hikers can continue up the increasingly steep trail for another mile and a half to reach the ridge and climb to the top of Storm Mountain.

The ski resorts will be opening soon and we wanted to share some Tips for Preventing Common Ski and Snowboard Injuries. Stacy McCooey of MountainTop Physical Therapy offers insight into winter’s on-mountain injuries and how to best avoid them. By doing just a few targeted exercises ahead of your time on the mountain can greatly reduce your likelihood of sustaining ski and snowboard injuries.

Of course, avoiding injury altogether is preferable. The good news is most injuries can be prevented with simple exercises or minimizing the amount of time you spend walking in ski boots. Knee problems, for instance, can be mitigated by strengthening the hamstrings and hips while shoulder injuries can be offset by working on the rotator cuffs. “I think dry-land training is so important in injury prevention and now is the perfect time to do it,” says McCooey. “It depends on your sport and body type, but often we develop muscle imbalances from our activities and daily habits. The general theme is to lengthen what is too short and strengthen what is too long. It is all about creating a balance that allows your joints, muscles, tendons and nerves to function optimally. Balance is crucial within the demands of your sport/desired activity.” While it usually takes around six weeks to see meaningful muscle growth from exercise programs, people can begin to gain strength and improve neuro-muscular connections within the first couple of weeks. Although there are dozens of individual exercises, from lunges and squats to hip lifts and everything in between.

So what about stretching? Apparently, the jury is still out on the benefits of static position stretching. Instead, McCooey recommends warming the muscles up with some dynamic movement, taking it easy on the first couple of runs, and tuning into what’s happening with your body. After a day on the slopes, many of us head straight to the hot tub for a long soak, but it may not be for everyone. “For cooling down, you can try some gentle stretches or other forms of recovery,” says McCooey. “A hot tub can feel great and loosen up stiff joints, but it may also increase inflammation.

Anyone who’s wished they too could tumble sans pain into the ridiculous shapes young children do while skiing and snowboarding, also knows injury can become more prevalent as we get older. “Nutrition, genetics, and body type all come into play, but in general, as we age, our bodies become less pliable and we lose muscle mass,” says McCooey. “This increases the demand on a maintenance or ‘TLC’ routine we likely could get by without in years past. The good news is that the effects of aging can largely be mitigated by catching things early, before they turn in to an actual injury.” Adding variety to your routine is one of the best ways to do this. Since most of us spend a lot of time sitting, with our legs bent at 90 degrees, and facing forward, any movement that switches up these day-to-day patterns can be helpful, whether it’s moving from side to side or getting down into the “third-world squat”. McCooey also suggests getting over the ‘one final run’ syndrome. “Injuries usually happen when we’re not feeling one hundred percent and decide to take that last run we’re not mentally or physically prepared for,” says McCooey. “The most important advice to avoid injury is to always listen to and respect your pain.” Need some more ideas for training? Check out these simple, but effective exercises

Are you looking to move, here are 4 Tips for Home-Buying During the Colder Months:

Attend cozy open houses - Use the time you're looking for a home to mingle and fight the winter blues. Go see what's open in your area, check out a new location or inspect a home you really want. Open houses provide many opportunities including the chance to mingle and network. Even if you don't like the house you visit, you may hear of others nearby. You'll find many houses for sale in the winter that have open houses, and checking them out in person can show you exactly what the house will be like during the colder months.

Read the home inspection reports - While it's chilly outside, pull up a comfy chair and a mug of hot chocolate or coffee and do some research. With the bad weather and cold air that come with the season in some areas of the country, it's easier to sit inside and get the monotonous part of moving out of the way first. Plus, getting some of the boring stuff done early gives you more time to spend on the fun things like getting open house gifts.

Look for drafts and other leaks - There's no better time than winter to check out houses for sale. With the home working at the highest level, potential buyers can easily check out windows and doors for air leaks. Gaps are easier to find because drafts are often present when the winter wind is blowing hard outside. Plus, going to showings in the winter lets you see the property during the drab months of the year, allowing you to envision it in the nicer weather.

Check out the parking in bad weather - When you need a parking spot close to home in the winter, it's best to go for showings during this season. Looking at houses when there's snow on the ground lets you see where the problems occur in the area. You can avoid houses that have access problems, drainage issues or are last on the list for the snowplow.

Many people think winter is a bad time to look for a new home; however, several advantages make this season better than most. For example, if you don't want to go out in the cold weather, then chances are neither will your neighbors. Second, a home will show all its problems in the winter because the systems have to work extremely hard to keep up with frigid temperatures.

Stephen Roney - Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 05, 2019

Judy and I have been a part of the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties team for many years and we wanted to share a recent article on Stephen Roney, the CEO and owner.

 

Stephen C. Roney: Service and Marketing Expertise Make the Difference - As the former president and CEO of the First American Corporation’s Residential Group and its subsidiary, MarketLinx, Stephen C. Roney was responsible for building one of the largest residential real estate platforms to provide transaction management, MLS and CRM software and services to more than 500,000 agents and brokers. Today he serves as CEO and owner of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties, one of the state’s largest brokerage firms.

What are you seeing in the Utah market this year?

Stephen Roney: Along the Wasatch Back (Park City area), there continues to be significant development activity throughout our market area coupled with enhancements to both Deer Valley Resort and Park City Mountain. We believe this, in conjunction with anticipated inventory increases and low interest rates, will continue to drive our markets in a positive direction. As the market begins to stabilize, we see increased buying opportunities in Summit and Wasatch counties, especially with the continued growth around the Jordanelle Reservoir and Heber Valley. Along the Wasatch Front (Salt Lake Valley through Ogden), strong demand and low inventory levels persist. We expect appreciation to continue, sales to remain strong, and a variety of development options to emerge across all sectors of the Wasatch Front. We anticipate mortgage rates will reduce slightly in the near term and also expect increased buyer activity, especially at or below median prices. With a strong regional economy in Utah, we see little sign of a market downturn in the foreseeable future.

Are you planning to grow your firm in the next 12 months? If so, in what capacity…increasing agent count, new offices, new markets, mergers/acquisitions, etc.?

SR: In short, yes. We have recently opened an office in St. George, which has seen rapid growth as retirement, warm weather and business expansion bring more and more buyers to the area. We are also actively evaluating entry possibilities in other markets in Utah and nearby states.

What most sets your firm apart in the marketplace?

SR: In one word, culture. We have great agents and employees who demonstrate knowledge, services, integrity and teamwork every day. Additionally, we have unparalleled experience in development marketing, sales and advisory services in our markets. We also have an in-house marketing department that includes marketing strategy/planning, graphic design, digital and social media marketing, and print and public relations capabilities.

How are you updating your technology and training to provide the resources agents need to succeed?

SR: Our chief technology officer and executive leadership team are constantly evaluating new technology and maintaining alignment with Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices’ existing platforms and future initiatives.

How are you attracting new agents to your firm and retaining top producers?

SR: We have a very selective recruiting process for new agents. We look for strong-producing agents or other individuals with significant sales and service backgrounds who will fit our culture and benefit from the strength of our marketing capabilities, development experience, and leadership team. We also place great value on collaboration and collegiality. Retaining top-producing agents requires building and maintaining the “best in market” leadership team and support capabilities.

What do you look for in someone new coming into the company?

SR: A successful and sustainable business will flourish in a culture that honors service, knowledge and a strong work ethic. Preserving the trust of our agents and their clients is our No. 1 priority.

Vitals: Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties - Years in Business: 43

Size: 30 offices, 475 agents - Regions Served: Northern Utah: Wasatch Back (Park City, Heber Valley, East Summit County, Jordanelle), Wasatch Front (Utah, Salt Lake, Davis and Weber Counties); and moving into Southern Utah: St. George

2018 Sales Volume: $2.195 billion - 2018 Transactions: 3,556 - www.bhhsutah.com

We will wrap up this blog with 4 Tips for Home-Buying During the Colder Months. Here are four ideas to help make the home search process faster and more convenient during the colder months:

Attend cozy open houses - Use the time you're looking for a home to mingle and fight the winter blues. Go see what's open in your area, check out a new location or inspect a home you really want. Open houses provide many opportunities including the chance to mingle and network. Even if you don't like the house you visit, you may hear of others nearby. You'll find many houses for sale in the winter that have open houses, and checking them out in person can show you exactly what the house will be like during the colder months.

Read the home inspection reports - While it's chilly outside, pull up a comfy chair and a mug of hot chocolate or coffee and do some research. With the bad weather and cold air that come with the season in some areas of the country, it's easier to sit inside and get the monotonous part of moving out of the way first. Plus, getting some of the boring stuff done early gives you more time to spend on the fun things like getting open house gifts.

Look for drafts and other leaks - There's no better time than winter to check out houses for sale. With the home working at the highest level, potential buyers can easily check out windows and doors for air leaks. Gaps are easier to find because drafts are often present when the winter wind is blowing hard outside. Plus, going to showings in the winter lets you see the property during the drab months of the year, allowing you to envision it in the nicer weather.

Check out the parking in bad weather - When you need a parking spot close to home in the winter, it's best to go for showings during this season. Looking at houses when there's snow on the ground lets you see where the problems occur in the area. You can avoid houses that have access problems, drainage issues or are last on the list for the snowplow.

Many people think winter is a bad time to look for a new home; however, several advantages make this season better than most. For example, if you don't want to go out in the cold weather, then chances are neither will your neighbors. Second, a home will show all its problems in the winter because the systems have to work extremely hard to keep up with frigid temperatures.

Happy Halloween!

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Oct 29, 2019

Halloween is tomorrow! Get into the spirit with wagon rides, spooky soirées, Old Town traditions, and more. Don’t miss the trick-or-treat tradition on Main Street, followed by the Howl-O-Ween parade.

Halloween on Main Street 2019 - Thursday October 31st, 2019

3:00-5:00 p.m. Trick-or-Treating: Little ghosts and goblins are invited to Main Street for fun and safe Trick-or-Treating, compliments of participating merchants!

5:00 p.m. Dog Parade on Lower Main Street: Leashed, costumed dogs and their owners will meet below the Lower Main Street Pedestrian bridge at 4:45 p.m. The parade will begin at 5:00 p.m. and will march to Heber Avenue.

Looking for more - Park City Magazine shares Ways to Celebrate Halloween In and Around Park City. It’s the spookiest season of the year, and whether you like celebrating with adults-only costume parties or trick-or-treating with the kiddos, there is a local event for you. From walking in the legendary Howl-O-Ween dog parade to haunted wagon rides, use this guide to find the ten best Halloween happenings around town—plus a few favorites beyond Summit County’s borders.

Sleepy Hollow Wagon Rides - ends tonight! Spy the Headless Horsemen on a spooky horse-drawn wagon ride winding around the woods of Midway. Hear “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” as Rocky Mountain Outfitters guides your wagon through the forest. Rides available from 6–10 p.m. Tickets: $25 per person online, or find discounts on Groupon and Rocky Mountain Outfitters’ Facebook page. sleepyhollowutah.com

Family Fright Nights - ends tonight! Get in the spirit with free screenings of family-friendly Halloween classics at the Park City Library. Popcorn and lemonade provided. Catch Hocus Pocus October 26 at 3:00 p.m., and Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween October 30 at 6:30 p.m. parkcityfilm.org

16th Annual “Transylvania Tea Party” Blood Drive - Thursday, October 31. Deer Valley partners with ARUP Blood Services for its annual Halloween blood drive, encouraging folks to donate to those suffering from emergencies, illnesses, and blood disorders. Walk-ins welcome from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., but you may also book an appointment online at arupbloodservices.org using search code B068. Costumes are encouraged; light refreshments provided.

Howl-O-Ween and Trick-or-Treating on Main Street - Thursday, October 31. Trick or treat! Bring the kids for safe, fun, candy gathering along Historic Main Street from 3–5 p.m., courtesy of local merchants. Stay for the best Park City Halloween tradition of all: the Howl-O-Ween parade. Watch costumed pups march down Main at 5 p.m., or bring your own dressed up four-legged friend and don a costume to participate. historicparkcityutah.com 

Grappa Halloween Party - Thursday, October 31. After Park City’s parade, celebrate with grown-ups at Grappa’s Main Street patio for a reception-style event with craft cocktails and delectable bites served in a spooky atmosphere. Wear a costume, mingle to the music, and enjoy this haunted Halloween evening from 6–9 p.m. Tickets required: $75 at grapparestaurant.com.

Park City Ghost Tours - Nightly. Get in the Halloween spirit on an Old Town tour uncovering the ghosts of this old mining town. From the Man in the Yellow Slicker to the Woman in the Window, you’ll hear the local lore and walk past haunted homes and buildings where ghosts linger. Tours take place at 8 p.m. daily. And reservations are not required. Just show up at Miner’s Park on Main Street and look for the costumed tour guide. Tickets: $20 for adults, $10 for children. parkcityghosttours.com

Beyond Park City

Pumpkin Nights in Salt Lake City - Through November 4. Drive down the canyon to witness the Utah State Fairpark transformed into an immersive, pumpkin-filled land. Perfect for children too young for scary haunted houses, wander from room to room to see decorated pirate ships, dragons, and undersea worlds with a vibe that’s delightful, not frightful. See over 3,000 hand-carved pumpkins, watch fire dancers perform, paint a pumpkin, and stay for a Halloween movie screening on select nights. Tickets: $20 for adults, $18 for seniors, $16 for kids. If your family stays up late, save with the daily night owl discount from 8 p.m. to close. pumpkinnights.com

Sundance Halloween Lift Rides - Through October 31. Catch the fall colors and the rising moon on family-friendly Halloween Lift Rides at Sundance Resort. Lasting 45 to 60 minutes, the ride on Ray’s Lift takes you above spooky scenes under moonlight. Back at the base find games, cozy blankets, steaming cups of hot cocoa, and snacks for sale. When the weather permits, a Halloween movie plays outdoors at the base. Lift rides run 7-10 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 7-11 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays). Tickets available online at sundanceresort.com. Lift tickets: $25 for adults, $22 for children and students, and $19 for seniors. Add a Halloween Zip Tour for $59 per person.

In real estate news Utah ties for #1 in 10 States With the Fastest Rates of Job Growth, 2020. U.S. job growth in 2019 is likely to average 170,000 jobs per month, down from 223,000 in 2018. The decline is partly attributable to fewer available workers to hire with the low unemployment rate. Also, businesses are reluctant to aggressively pursue growth, given increasing economic uncertainty from the trade war with China.

Hiring in some sectors –-particularly health care-– remains robust. Services associated with a growing economy, such as computers, restaurants, and temporary help, are also up. The weak spots? Retail is shedding workers as stores continue to close. The telecom sector also continues its long decline. The drop in oil prices has led to job cuts in the oil and gas sector. As a result, some states buoyed by thriving industries are adding jobs at much faster clips than others. Check out the 10 states with the fastest projected rates of job growth for 2020.

T-1. Utah

Population: 3,161,000

Unemployment rate: 2.8%

2019 job growth: 3.0% (46,200)

2020 job growth: 2.0% (31,300)

Utah's economy is humming, consistently one of the best-performing in the country with expansion continuing in every major sector from healthcare to basic manufacturing. Hiring will expand by 3.0% this year, down slightly from last year's sizzling 3.2% growth. Slower workforce growth may be a helpful development with unemployment at a low 2.8% rate that underlines the scarcity of workers to fill jobs.

Utah has a large presence in a number of rapidly growing high-tech sectors including cloud computing and software development as well as in aerospace and life sciences. Its relatively cheaper real estate, growing talent pool and proximity to other higher-cost Western tech centers is fostering growth of a "Silicon Slopes" cloud computing and "Bionic Valley" bioengineering center around Salt Lake City. As many as one in every seven jobs in the state –-300,000 in all-– are generated by high-tech companies that typically pay more than other industries.

T-1. Nevada

Population: 3,034,000

Unemployment rate: 4.1%

2019 job growth: 3.0% (42,400 new jobs)

2020 job growth: 2.0% (29,200 new jobs)

3. Florida

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Population: 21,299,000

Unemployment rate: 3.3%

2019 job growth: 2.5% (222,300)

2020 job growth: 1.9% (173,300)

4. Idaho

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Population: 1,754,000

Unemployment rate: 2.9%

2019 job growth: 2.5% (18,600)

2020 job growth: 1.8% (13,600)

T-5. Arizona

Population: 7,172,000

Unemployment rate: 5.0%

2019 job growth: 2.5% (72,300)

2020 job growth: 1.7% (50,400)

T-5. Washington

Population: 7,536,000

Unemployment rate: 4.6%

2019 job growth: 2.6% (89,500)

2020 job growth: 1.7% (60,000)

7. Texas

Population: 28,702,000

Unemployment rate: 3.4%

2019 job growth: 2.3% (290,600)

2020 job growth: 1.6% (207,200)

8. Colorado

Population: 5,696,000

Unemployment rate: 2.8%

2019 job growth: 2.1% (57,700)

2020 job growth: 1.4% (39,200)

9. Oregon

Population: 4,191,000

Unemployment rate: 4.0%

2019 job growth: 1.9% (36,500)

2020 job growth: 1.3% (25,400)

T-10. Alabama

Population: 4,888,000

Unemployment rate: 3.1%

2019 job growth: 1.8% (37,000)

2020 job growth: 1.2% (25,000)

 

Park City Instead Of Universal Studios

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Oct 22, 2019

Priorities change when kids come into the picture. This applies especially to vacation destinations that we choose for our families. We need to have family-friendly, wholesome and educational vacations that everyone will enjoy. When traveling to the United States, we often see Universal Studios as one of the must-visit places to see. However, there are many more family vacation destinations that we can choose from among many tourist spots in America. These are places with activities that all family members from different ages will surely enjoy. Parents will appreciate the care that staff in these places give to our families, plus the added attraction of entertainment and accommodation options. In 10 Family Vacation Destinations In America Better Than Universal Studios Park City comes in #1.

Park City Mountain Resort, Utah - The perfect winter vacation in your family is waiting for you at the Park City Mountain Resort. Quaint lodgings will welcome you as you prepare to enjoy the different winter activities offered by the resort. Ski and snowboard lessons are available not just for adults but for children as well. The village around the resort deserves a visit as well because of the history it holds as an old mining village. There are also events that you can take part in like music festivals, holiday celebrations, and fireworks displays. Stop by the numerous cute shops that offer tasty snacks, handcrafted cocktails and mouth-watering dishes for your family.

Mark your calendars - Pendry is letting locals in on a sneak peek every Wednesday now through November 20th.

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Something to keep in mind for 2020... Savor the Summit will take a break next year to evaluate and improve annual dinner party. The Park City Area Restaurant Association announced that Savor the Summit will take next summer off, but, according to Executive Director Ginger Wicks, the break will not be a vacation. Instead, she and her crew will form a committee and take time to reevaluate Park City’s largest outdoor dinner party, which has been an annual event featuring an iconic mile-long dining table that runs down Main Street. “Because it’s such a big event, we haven’t been able to really do a deep dive and examine what works for the restaurants, and what the guests really like and what they don’t like,” Wicks said. “So we we’re starting the deep dive immediately.”

Savor the Summit started 13 years ago as a multi-day event on upper Main Street in conjunction with the now-defunct Park City Jazz Festival, which was held at Deer Valley Resort. “In the old days, if you didn’t get a reservation early, you weren’t eating, and we have noticed that has changed in the past couple of years,” she said. “Not all of the restaurants sell out, and we want to take a look at that.” If all goes well, the association will have a good idea of what the new Savor the Summit will look like in the early spring of 2021.

Hikes, Hot Springs and Food

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Oct 14, 2019

Judy and I love taking long drives and hiking in Park City. Before it gets too cold, check out these 10 easy hikes. Hiking is a great way to see wildlife, wildflowers, waterfalls, arches and other people taking pictures of all of the above. Here’s a list of 10 easy-to-moderate trails around the state to get you started. Please note that easy and accessible hikes are often the most popular. But that just means there will be more people around to take triumphant photos of you atop a mighty peak.

1. Cecret Lake

Location: Salt Lake Valley (Little Cottonwood Canyon) - Distance: 1.5 miles round trip

This hike is strewn with wildflowers AND other people enjoying the alpine lake views. Put your clothes back on! The lake is part of the Wasatch watershed so there’s no swimming. Get more info here.

2. Lake Mary

Location: Salt Lake Valley (Big Cottonwood Canyon) - Distance: 2 miles round trip

Lake MaryA favorite vacation destination for nude sunbathing moose. Don’t stare or they’ll make a weird face at you. Wait... that's just their faces. Get more info here.

3. City Creek

Location: Salt Lake City - Distance: 5.6 miles round trip - City CreekA pleasant walk through the canyon, five minutes from downtown Salt Lake. Stick to the paved road or wander about on the various dirt trails. Get more info here.

4. Birdsong Trail

Location: Ogden Canyon - Distance: 1 mile round trip

Shady, short and perfect for the little ones. If you listen close you’ll hear birds singing “We Are the World” by Michael Jackson. Get more info here.

5. Adams Canyon

Location: Layton - Distance: 3.5 miles round trip

Adams CanyonAn accessible hike to a sparkly waterfall. This isn't the easiest hike on this list, as it has switchbacks and gravelly bits, so give yourself plenty of time. Once you’re an expert hiker, put on your crampons and do it again in winter to see the waterfall frozen. Get more info here.

6. Goblin Valley

Location: San Rafael Swell - Distance: Variable, Goblin ValleyGreat winter or early spring destination (summer = burning hell-pot). Kids love scrambling around the goblin rock formations. Goblins love eating kids. Everyone wins. Get more info here.

7. Corona Arch

Location: Moab - Distance: 3 miles round trip, Corona ArchA real purdy red rock hike to the beautiful Bowtie and Corona Arches. The trail is a bit adventurous and includes a short section with a ladder and rope. You got this. Get more info here.

8. The Watchman Trail

Location: Zion National Park - Distance: 3 miles round trip

The WatchmanSunrise or sunset are the perfect times for this scenic hike. The colors of Zion’s canyon walls will be saturated with pink light. Keep yourself saturated (with water) if you do this hike midday in the summer. Get more info here.

9. Hickman Bridge Trail

Location: Capitol Reef National Park - Distance: 2 miles round trip

Hickman BridgeYet another red rock hike to a beautiful arch. It has some switchbacks at first and then levels out. Keep your eyes peeled for ruins from the Fremont culture. Get more info here.

10. Spectra Point Trail

Location: Cedar Breaks National Monument - Distance: 2 miles round trip

Spectra PointAt 10,000 feet this hike is perfect for escaping the summer heat. Lowlanders might huff and puff, but the view from the overlook is worth every gasp. Get more info here.

Once your hike is done, visit one of these 7 Area Hot Springs Worth a Visit - Pack your suit and hit the road for one of these nearby hot springs.

Lava Hot Springs - Just over 180 miles from Park City is the kitschy town of Lava Hot Springs, Idaho, named for the mineral water pools there, ranging in temp from 102 to 110 degrees (430 E Main St, 208.776.5221). Book a room at the Home Hotel (306 E Main St, 208.776.5050) and grab a post-soak beer at the Blue Moon Bar & Grill (89 S 1st E, 208.776.5007). Go: I-15 N to Exit 47, then drive east for 11 miles.

Crystal Hot Springs - These 100-year-old pools outside of Honeyville (8215 N Hwy 38, 435.339.0038) have an interesting history: during World War II, wounded soldiers were sent to rehab at these springs by President Roosevelt. Today, you’ll find there a large natural soaking pool, a steamy Olympic-size pool, and a hot pool with a cool waterslide. Go: Hwy 84 N to I-15 N to Exit 372 at Honeyville.

The Homestead Crater - You’ll feel like you’re on another planet when you walk into the massive limestone rock dome to access this 65-foot-deep geothermal pool, hovering around a constant 90 to 96 degrees, at the Homestead Resort (700 N Homestead Dr, 435.654.1102, reservations required). Go: US 40 E to a right turn on River Rd, then follow the signs.

Diamond Fork Hot Springs (a.k.a. Fifth Water Hot Springs) - Good things come to those who hike: upon completing the 2.5-mile walk from the trailhead on Diamond Fork Road, you’ll be rewarded with a variety of hot natural pools and scenic waterfalls. Don’t be alarmed if you happen upon nude bathers here—swimsuits, while required, are often considered optional. Go: I-15 S to Exit 258/Price and drive east for 11 miles to Diamond Fork Rd.

Baker Hot Springs - The water in the three large soaking tubs at Baker Hot Springs can be very hot, but you can adjust the temp via two hot- and cold-water ditches that fill the tubs. Admission is free, but all maintenance is performed by volunteers, so please pack out your trash. Go: I-15 S to Hwy 132 W (Nephi) to Hwy 174 and follow the signs.

Meadow Hot Springs - These three crystal-clear pools are deep enough for snorkeling and scuba diving with the proper gear. The pools are located on private property in Meadow, just south of Fillmore, but they’re open to the public and camping is allowed. Go: I-15 S to a left off Exit 158; drive 4 miles to the hot springs.

Mystic Hot Springs - Owned by artist Mike Ginsburg, a.k.a. Mystic Mike, this funky Monroe-area resort (475 E 100 N, 435.527.3286) features two soaking pools and eight bathtubs built into the red-rock landscape. Buy a daily pass, or spend the night in a restored pioneer cabin or a converted school bus; tent and car camping are also permitted. Go: Take I-15 S to Exit 188/Scipio. Head east on Hwy 50 to I-70 W. Pull off at Exit 31 to Monroe.

Mapped has 13 activities that will make you re-evaluate your favourite ski destination to Park City. Sitting just 40 minutes away from the Salt Lake City airport and 7,000 feet above sea level, Park City is the ski resort you’ve been missing out on all this time. Featuring a ski-town vibe to rival Whistler’s, slopes that would have Coloradoans jealous, and light, powdery snow that is unique to Utah’s own corner of the globe, Park City makes for an unforgettable stay.

Take a look at these 13 must-do activities to get a taste of what it’s like to have your life elevated at Park City.

Have brunch at Five5eeds Featuring some of the city’s most delicious (and best-presented) brunch options, Five5eeds recently underwent an expansion so that they could fit more customers and fill more bellies with their unique dishes.

With more than a hint of the Australian foodie culture — and seriously good coffee — thanks to Five5eeds’ owners, its no wonder that the colourful plates and perpetually on point aesthetic cause a line going out the door. We’d suggest getting there early to secure yourself a seat, because it’s just. That. Good. 1600 Snow Creek Drive, Park City

Go snowboarding or skiing - Park City Mountain, while this one is a no-brainer for the resort city, we had to add it to the list for obvious reasons. With two resorts to choose from — though only one if you’re a snowboarder — Park City’s slopes are bucket-list worthy for their jaw-dropping views, an assortment of runs, and powder straight out of a skier’s dream.

Thanks to the high elevation and the extremely low humidity, Utah has been known to have the best snow on earth, as it stays light and fluffy throughout the entire ski season.

Park City Mountain Resort, which merged with Canyons Resort in 2015 to create the 7,300-acre playground that it is today, is one of the largest ski resorts in the US, featuring 17 peaks, over 330 runs, and 41 different lifts.

Deer Valley is the other option for skiers (snowboarders are not allowed on the privately-owned slopes) and features premium, well-groomed runs, multiple apres-ski dining options, and some of the finest snow you’ll ever find.

Stay at the Park City Peaks Hotel (or at least eat at their restaurant)

The recently-renovated Park City Peaks Hotel makes for the perfect jumping off point for any of the city’s awesome outdoor activities — that is if you can even tear yourself away from the firelit lobby, indoor and outdoor pools and hot tubs, under-the-stars fireplace, and fully outfitted gym.

If you’re planning on staying in for the night, you can pop over to Versante Hearth and Bar (it’s connected to the hotel) for a nightcap or one of the city’s best wood-fired pizzas, among other delicious delights.

Use Ski Butlers to get the gear you need

Don’t feel like hauling your snowboard or skis into the taxi/baggage check/shuttle bus? Not a problem. Park City’s own Ski Butlers can hook you up with all your skiing needs right at your hotel so that you’re all ready to hit the slopes the next morning. Need an adjustment or your board isn’t feeling just right? They’ll meet you on the mountain with a replacement to get you back to the top of the lift ASAP.

Check out the Park Silly Sunday Market (this one will have to wait till next year)

Operating during the summer months, the Park Silly Sunday Market is an open-air market that brings together the community and local vendors. The market runs from 10 am to 5 pm on Sundays from June 2 to September 22 (with a few exceptions in August) and makes for a great way to start your Sunday in the sun!

Take a winery mining tour

Before Park City was a world-renowned ski destination, it was a mining town, with prospectors finding silver underneath the snow-covered hills. A few wineries around the area even offer a historical tour of the mining buildings, mixing in a few glasses of the good stuff to keep attendees in tip-top shape.

Fox School of Wine offers a three-hour, six location jaunt around some of the city’s oldest buildings (don’t worry, you won’t have to crawl into any cold, wet tunnels). You’ll learn about both the vintages and the history of Park City on the infinitely informative tour.

Grab a bite to eat at Riverhorse Provisions

This little spot on Main Street is perfect whether you’re hoping for a quick cuppa joe or a sit-down meal. With a well-stocked market upstairs, a cozy cafe/brunch hotspot downstairs, and apres-ski packs to go, you’ll be able to get some delicious fuel for whatever the day may bring.

Go on a yoga adventure

A few days on the slopes can leave you stiff and sore, and sometimes the jets in that outdoor hot tub just aren’t quite strong enough. Mix in a stretch (and an unforgettable experience) by signing up for a Park City Yoga Adventures tour, taking you out into the snowy expanse of the mountains for some yurt yoga, or onto the calm waters of a natural hot spring for some paddleboard yoga.

Fuel up at Vessel Kitchen

Don’t let the fact that this walk-up-to-order restaurant is quick and affordable fool you — the lunch and dinner on offer here rivals some of the best sit-downs around. With filling, hearty food laid out right in front of you and a wide selection of beers, you’ll be leaving here happy, healthy, and absolutely full.

Drink up at High West Distillery and Saloon

If you ever wanted to know what it was like to walk through the doors of an old saloon, High West is your best bet. While they may not have the classic swinging doors that you’ve seen on the old cowboy movies (Park City is far too cold for that), the saloon more than makes up for it with its astounding aesthetic, delicious drink, and one-of-a-kind atmosphere.

Rest your legs at Mid Mountain Lodge

This miners’ boarding house-turned-refurbished hotspot has become the go-to place for a break from the slopes. You’ll need to purchase a pass to Park City Mountain to make it there via ski or snowboard, but the destination is definitely worth the trip. Located halfway up the mountain, the lodge is the picture of a bumping ski resort: patio chairs circle roaring fires, faux fur lines the cozy chairs, and the lunch menu is filled with warm, hearty meals that will see you through countless runs on the slopes.

If all that isn’t enough, it’s also one of just two spots on the mountain where you can grab yourself a drink from a full bar to enjoy in that midday sun — though if you’re just looking for a cold beer, you’ll be able to get that at any one of the mountain’s lodges.

Catch a flick at the Sundance Film Festival

For ten days every year, the Sundance Film Festival lands in Park City, Utah with the most thought-provoking and visually-stunning films of the year. It’s the largest independent film festival in the United States, and if you can manage to time your trip just right, you’ll be able to enjoy the festival to its fullest potential. You may even spot a celebrity or two.

Have Dinner at Hearth + Hill

This recently-opened restaurant may be new to the city, but it’s already becoming a local favourite. The perfect spot for a hot date or a dinner with the whole family, Hearth + Hill’s warm atmosphere, wide (and affordable) menu selection, and friendly staff make it an ideal go-to for any night of the week. Oh, and the build your own Old Fashioned is something straight out of a daydream — you have to try it to believe it!

The New Salt Lake Airport

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Oct 08, 2019

The $3.6 billion rebuild of the Salt Lake City International Airport is now on a countdown, with less than a year to go until its first phase is slated to open to the public. Crews are on a tight schedule to put finishing touches on the brand new airport meant to be a state-of-the-art replacement for Salt Lake City’s current hub.

Drywall, paint, glass, flooring and other near-finishing touches have already taken shape in some areas, transforming the north and south concourses from what were once skeletal steel structures into what has begun to look and feel like an airport, with nearly-completed concession areas, seating areas, and vast hallways with already installed moving walkways.

Also taking shape is what’s lauded as one of the new airport’s crowned jewels — a grand plaza area in the south concourse, where travelers can buy food from restaurants including the Market Street Grill and Pago and relax while watching planes land and lift off from a sweeping, 45-foot-tall wall of glass windows.

Above the plaza, stretching all the way back across another set of glass windows and doors that separate the public from the secure area of the terminal building, is where a multi-colored art installation called “the Wave”. Already in place, lighting glowed from behind the walls up toward the ceiling where the Wave will be mounted. Viewers can take a virtual tour of the future airport at the new airport’s website, where renderings show the Wave’s rainbow colors.

Standing in front of the plaza’s enormous window wall looking out across the future air strips, Williams said once the new concourses are open, work will begin to demolish the airport’s current facilities — so when travelers look out the window, they eventually won’t see the old airport facilities, but instead they’ll see Utah’s Wasatch Mountains. Drivers heading out of Utah’s largest airport will now have to experience a new detour to exit that will become the permanent road out of the airport.

Salt Lake City is one of the only cities in the world with the capability to build a new airport on new ground, rather than renovate its existing facility, Williams said. Salt Lake City’s current facilities are “overwhelmed,” he said, serving more than 26 million passengers in buildings that were built more than 50 years ago to handle half as many travelers.

The new airport is designed to be more efficient to prevent airplane bottlenecks and passenger delays. A single terminal featuring a centralized “Gateway Center” will streamline pickup and drop-off, check-in, security and baggage claim processes, Williams said. No taxpayer dollars are being used to fund the redevelopment, according to airport officials. Instead, it’s being funded using a combination of airline and passenger fees.

The west side of the south concourse is scheduled to open to the public by the Sept. 15, 2020 deadline. The western north concourse’s opening, originally expected in perhaps late 2020 or early 2021, is now on schedule to open early in October 2020, Williams said. Once both concourses are fully open — including the east segments of the concourses not slated for completion until 2024, after the old buildings are demolished — Williams said the airport will feature a total of 78 gates.

There are plenty of restaurants to choose from in town, but here is Eater's Essential Restaurants in Park City, Utah. From sushi to coffee to late-night pizza, here are the best places to eat in Utah’s most famous ski town.

1. Cortona Italian Cafe 1612 W Ute Blvd #112 (435) 608-1373

Don’t let Cortona’s off-the-beaten-path location — a few minutes outside of town in a strip mall — deter you; it’s the go-to spot for homemade pasta (think clouds of gnocchi and rich lamb bolognese) and standout gelato. Choose this restaurant on your way into or out of town, or use it as a solid option for dinner after skiing Canyons Resort.

2. The Farm Restaurant 6546, 4000 Canyons Resort Dr (435) 615-8080

Located in the heart of Canyons Resort Village, the Farm stays true to its name by serving locally sourced ingredients from farms and artisans throughout Utah. Enjoy a top-notch view of the ski slopes and tuck into sustainably raised meats like short rib or beef cheeks.

3. Versante Hearth + Bar 2346 Park Ave (435) 604-4012

Located inside the recently renovated Park City Peaks Hotel, Versante Hearth + Bar is a local’s favorite for affordable pizza and fresh pastas. It’s also a top spot for brunch thanks to savory egg hashes, breakfast sandwiches, and gooey cinnamon rolls.

4. Five5eeds 1600 Snow Creek Drive (435) 901-8242

If you’re sick of the hotel breakfast, Five5eeds has you covered with soul-warming coffee (it’s Australian, of course), and hipster-friendly staples like grain bowls and avocado toast.

5. Twisted Fern 1300 Snow Creek Drive, Suite RS (435) 731-8238

This recently opened New American spot in north Park City is a chef-owned restaurant that’s doing ingredient-driven dining right. Adam Ross’s impeccable food is a bit under the radar thanks to its strip-mall location, but we promise you’ll be back again and again for starters like blackened octopus and mains like chicken-fried portobello, cavatelli pasta, and bone-in short ribs.

6. El Chubasco 1890 Bonanza Dr (435) 645-9114

Condiment lovers, this one’s for you: At El Chubasco, more than 20 varieties of salsa — made daily — are perfect for pouring over huge smothered burritos, chile rellenos, tacos, enchiladas, and more. And it’s not just salsa — don’t miss other homemade condiments like charred jalapenos, escabeche, mole, and spicy crema.

7. Boneyard Saloon & Wine Dive 1251 Kearns Blvd (435) 649-0911

Located in an old lumberyard just north of downtown, this rustic gastropub serves up expert comfort food like steaks, ribs, burgers, and fries. Hit up the rooftop bar for large-screen TVs and the Wine Dive for 16 wines on tap.

8. Silver Star Cafe 1825 Three Kings Dr (435) 655-3456

At the base of Park City Mountain Resort’s Silver Star chairlift, this inviting rustic cafe serves up from-scratch food like delicious burgers, a tender French dip sandwich, and fresh salads. Silver Star is a top lunch spot to wait out a lift wind delay when you’re skiing Park City Mountain Resort, or a low-key dinner option away from the bustle of Main Street.

9. Vinto Pizzeria 900 Main St (435) 615-9990

Locals and visitors alike love this wood-fired pizza joint for its no-muss, no-fuss but still friendly atmosphere — especially when paired with housemade meatballs, piadine, simple pasta dishes, and gluten-free options. This is the place to go to keep it short and sweet after a long one on the slopes, or when the kids are burning out.

10. Cloud Dine 149 White Pine Canyon Rd

This recently renovated on-mountain restaurant offers food better than what can be found at the average ski co, served up in a convenient location at the Canyons. The new building has 316 seats and a large outdoor deck, located at the top of DreamCatcher and Dreamscape lifts. Fuel up on sandwiches, healthy salads, and warm flatbreads, then formulate the post-lunch plan of action while admiring the view from atop Dream Peak.

11. Old Town Cellars 890 Main St (435) 649-3759

This recently opened winery on Main Street is proving that you don’t have to be near the vines to have delicious wine. Sourcing labels from top regions throughout the country, Old Town blends and bottles on-site to offer a comfortable, après-ski setting. Don’t miss the charcuterie boards that pair with the flights.

12. Harvest 820 Park Ave suite 101 (435) 604-0463

Lovers of avocado toast and those with vegan or gluten-free preferences will love Harvest, a brightly lit, comfortable cafe serving soups, grain bowls, smoothies, and locally roasted coffee. The all-day menu is heavy on breakfast offerings, but don’t miss the chicken salad and chili con carne for a heartier lunch.

13. The Bridge Cafe and Grill 825 Main St (435) 658-5451

Located adjacent to Park City Mountain’s Town Lift with a great outdoor patio, the Bridge Cafe offers diner fare with a Brazilian twist. The traditional all-day breakfast is solid, and lunch offerings like the Brazuca steak sandwich with a fried egg, ham, and Swiss cheese make for a tasty, convenient, and filling option just steps from downtown.

14. 710 Bodega Tapas And Wine 710 Main St (435) 649-6979

Ski towns can be an overload of New American food, so the Spanish-inspired 710 Bodega is a breath of fresh air. Grab a glass of red (or the house sangria) and order tapas like the fried Brie bites with quince paste, Brussels sprouts with bacon, and beef and pork albondigas topped with manchego cheese.

15. Atticus Coffee, Books & Teahouse 738 Main St (435) 214-7241

Come to Atticus for the well-priced lattes, stay for the friendly baristas and freshly baked goods. In this part indie book store, part coffeehouse, the emphasis on fresh and healthy fare carries over to lunch, which features wraps, salads, sandwiches, and smoothies. Cozy armchairs and couches dot the space, so curl up and let the snow fall.

16. Davanza's 690 Park Ave (435) 649-2222

The decor at this locals’ hangout consists of thousands of vintage beer cans stacked up to the ceiling, and the comfort-classic food menu includes sandwiches (think meatball Parmesan, crispy Buffalo chicken, and Philly cheesesteak), pizza, and burgers. The no-frills joint will also keep the kids happy, but don’t come here if you’re looking for fine dining. This is quick and casual at its best.

17. High West Distillery 703 Park Ave (435) 649-8300

A reservation for dinner is a must, but you can kill time in the adjacent Saloon drinking killer cocktails like the Marooned Miner, a mix of rye whiskey, rum, creme de cacao, and blueberry cardamom bitters. Or opt for a flight of four tastings, then tuck in to comfort food like elk chili, bison short ribs, and chicken schnitzel.

18. Handle 136 Heber Ave (435) 602-1155

Step into the Handle dining room to find natural woods, an open kitchen, and a New American menu heavy on the share plates. And while modern comfort food is the go-to across this city, Handle shines with a strong cocktail program and items like cauliflower in Buffalo hot wing sauce and smoked sausage with cider-braised purple cabbage.

19. Yuki Yama Sushi 586 Main St (435) 649-6293

Start with the shishito peppers or the gyoza, then dive into everything from savory pork ramen to well-composed sushi rolls. Yuki Yama does it all well, and guests can choose to sit at the high-top bar tables, the sushi bar, or the traditional tatami room.

20. Fletcher's 562 Main St (435) 649-1111

It’s all about the share plates at Fletcher’s, located on Main Street with a bright dining room and cozy lounge. Start with the cheddar chive biscuits — don’t forget the bacon jam — and then tuck into larger entrees like buffalo with blue cheese fondue. For dessert, the warm butter cake with fresh berries is an instant classic.

21. Riverhorse on Main 540 Main St (435) 649-3536

This sophisticated-but-unstuffy sanctuary on Main Street offers big-city style and a welcoming ski-town attitude. Sit upstairs at the first-come, first-served bar, or snag a reservation for the brick-walled dining room that boasts blown-glass light fixtures overhead. The menu offers a rotating cast of locally sourced dishes like buffalo short rib and rainbow trout. Can’t score a table? Head to the more casual, cafe-market sister restaurant Riverhorse Provisions for wraps, salads, and smoked meats.

22. No Name Saloon & Grill 447 Main St (435) 649-6667

Don’t expect fancy when you come to No Name. Instead, grab a pint and gawk at everything from the brick barrel-vault ceiling to the mix of Christmas lights, taxidermy, rusty outboard motors, and old sleds thrown up on the wall. Sure, it’s crowded and noisy, but classics like the artichoke jalapeno dip and buffalo burgers go down just fine with a cheap beer or two. Plus, the people watching is epic.

23. Deer Valley Grocery Cafe 1375 Deer Valley Dr (435) 615-2400

Located in the Deer Valley Plaza in Snow Park, this tiny space turns out house-made baked goods and breads. For breakfast, get challah French toast with fruit compote or try the (also house-made) yogurt with deer valley granola. Breakfast sandwiches make way for creative lunchtime options like the tandoori chicken curry wrap, roasted pork loin baguette, and the stalwart grilled three-cheese. Don’t forget to pick up some local specialty foods to go on the way out.

24. Firewood 306 Main St (435) 252-9900

Have a craving for wood-fired meats and cocktails? Head to notable chef John Murko’s Main Street restaurant, Firewood. Eating rillettes, coal-roasted carrots, and elk is only half the fun: The restaurant’s giant wood-fire grill is set behind antique windows so you can spy all of the action in the kitchen.

25. Reef's Restaurant 7720 Royal Street East Deer Valley Club (435) 658-0323

Now located at Deer Valley Resort, this modern Mediterranean restaurant is worth the trek up the hill just to sample something different from the traditional ski town fare. You’ll find inspiring Middle Eastern flavors in hummus, baba ghanoush, and falafel, as well as surprising takes on schnitzel, salmon, and filet mignon with Polish dumplings.

Selling Your Home In Fall

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Oct 02, 2019

This week we will start with Top Tips for Getting Your Home Ready for the Fall Selling Season. Here are some of the top ways to get your home ready for the fall selling season in any market:

 

  • Color-coordinate the clothes in your closet for the appearance of more space.
  • Stage vacant or sparse rooms.
  • De-personalize your home–remove photographs and personal collections, and aim to keep trinkets to a minimum.
  • Refresh and replace grout as needed in your bathrooms and kitchen.
  • Check off the "grand negative impact" items from your list first: a leaking bathtub, a scraped up section of drywall, chipping paint, broken tiles, etc.
  • Make spaces neat, open, bright and airy. Start with a neutral base and venture into bolder accents only if your buyer research warrants them.
  • Less is always more in a property's sale preparation. Resist the urge to over-decorate.
  • Eliminate odd odors, and do not use scents as the buyer may dislike the ones you choose.
  • Deep-clean all surfaces, wash windows and keep them spotless.
  • Remove all cat litter boxes and dog toys a buyer can trip over.
  • If you have a garden, keep it colorful with plants that can be replaced if they should die.
While you are in the yard, here are 5 Tips for Prepping a Lawn for the Winter.

Keep mowing. Grass still needs regular care to stay healthy. Grass that is too high may attract lawn-damaging field mice. Shorter grass is more resistant to diseases and traps fewer falling leaves. Cutting the grass low also allows more sun to reach the crown of the grass. However, cutting off too much at one time can be damaging, so never trim more than a third of the grass blades off in a single cutting. Put mower blades on the lowest settings for the last two cuts of the season.

Aerate your lawn. Compressed soil can hurt the health of the grass. Aerating punches holes in the soil and lets oxygen, water, and nutrients into a lawn. Use a walk-behind aerator or get an attachment to pull behind a riding mower.

Mulch your leaves. Many mowers can mulch leaves with an attachment. Since mulching with a mower can mix grass clippings with leaf particles, these nitrogen-rich grass particles and carbon-rich leaf particles will compost more quickly. They can then return nutrients to the soil.

Trim and shore up trees and bushes. Use trimmers, chainsaws, or pole pruners to cut back trees, shrubs, and plants. Make sure branches are safely trimmed back from overhead lines and not in danger of falling on a home or structure in winter weather. You may need to tie or brace limbs of upright evergreens or plants to prevent them from breaking in high winds or snow. Call a professional arborist for big trees or hard-to-reach spots.

Repair bald spots. Fall is a great time to patch bald or thin spots in a lawn. The easiest way to do this is with an all-in-one lawn repair mixture (found at most garden shops and home centers). Use a garden rake or dethatcher to scratch loose the soil on the spot.

Do you have a vegetable garden, here are some tips for Preparing Your Garden for Winter. With the season drawing to a close, you need to do some work to prepare your garden for winter. By doing a little bit of work in the fall, you can protect your garden from some of the effects of the cold weather approaching and prepare your garden beds for a productive spring. Here are some tips for getting your garden ready for next year:

Clean Your Garden Beds - Start by moving all of the old mulch aside. Pull up any remaining weeds and remove any dead plant material or rotten vegetables. Some pests and plant diseases can live through the winter in any vegetation that is left behind, so it's important to clean the beds and dispose of the weeds and other plant material properly.

Add Some Mulch - Once you've cleared out all of the weeds and unwanted vegetation, you can add a thin layer of the old mulch to the garden beds. You want to be careful not to overdo it with winter mulching. When the soil freezes, it can kill many of the pests and diseases that can impact your garden. If you overdo it with the mulch, it can prevent the soil from freezing, and this will increase the chance that pests or diseases could survive the winter. Instead of adding new mulch right away, wait for the ground to freeze for the first time. With the ground frozen, you can now add some new mulch. When you apply this new layer of mulch later in the year, make sure to pay close attention to mulching around any perennial plants.

Collect Leaves - If you aren’t saving your leaves, it's time to start. They're perfect for adding carbon to a compost heap. If you don’t have a compost heap, you can turn them into leaf mulch to feed your gardens. One way to mulch your leaves is to just run them over with a cordless lawn mower and then collect the shredded leaves in bags. If you want to make it easier, you could get a leaf blower that has a mulching function or you could buy an electric leaf mulcher.

Expand Your Gardens  - If you're planning to garden more of your land next year, fall is the perfect time to build new garden beds or to expand the ones you have. If you care about aesthetic details, you may want to look into lightweight electric grass trimmers to help keep edges clean between pavement and lawn and lawn and garden bed. By getting the work done now, they'll be ready for you to plant with the rest of your beds next spring. Also, fall is often a good time to find discounts on things like soil and compost.

Test Your Soil - Autumn is a great time to test your soil. You'll obviously want to test the soil pH, but there are several other tests that may be valuable. Beyond pH, you could run tests for magnesium, sodium levels, potassium, calcium, phosphorus and sulfur. After running some tests, you'll know which types of amendments and fertilizers you may need to apply to your garden beds.

Airplanes and Food

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Sep 25, 2019

This week we have the update on the Heber City Airport, how to make your home look better in 10 minutes or less, and fun food festivals coming up this weekend. Recently, the Heber City Council approved a grant agreement to fund the Airport Master Plan update. The Heber Airport Master Plan will be updated for the first time since 2003 in the coming months (taking around 18 to 24 months). The update will fulfill grant assurances the city made to the Federal Aviation Administration which subsidizes the costs of operation at the airport. Without the master plan update the city would be required to pay for upkeep of the airport on their own. The master plan update will be managed by Heber City Manager Matt Brower, Airport Engineer Jeremy McAlister and Airport Manager Travis Biggs.

The Community Advisory Committee will provide the Airport Master Plan update with a voice for the community as a whole as different elements and impacts are considered. Heber City Manager Matt Brower noted that they still need a few more recommendations from council to fill out the list of 10-15 committee members.

“There is a representative we’re looking for from Midway still, from Charleston, from the local airport committee or I should say (Users and Tennent's Association) we have two at large members,” Brower explained. “So, we're looking to council right now to see if we can't make sure we round out this committee.” The Technical Advisory Committee on the other hand is much smaller and is meant to have members with a technical background in aviation, airports and the FAA. “The FAA pays for 90.63% the state pays for 6.6% and we pay for the other 4.685%,” Biggs said. “So, our costs will be $27,781 which has been included in the budget.”

Fall and cooler weather is upon us and before you get too comfortable, here is How To Make Your Home Look 10 Times Better in 10 Minutes Or Less.

Cut the clutter - Almost everybody has these little spots of clutter—a box over here, a pile of papers over there. You may barely even notice these things, because you’re so used to seeing them. A neat trick - Take a picture of your home, this will help you see it through new eyes, and maybe inspire you to find permanent homes for things that are sitting out.

Take something away - So many interiors have just a little too much stuff. By removing one or two items creates a more breathable, relaxing atmosphere, and gives the things that are left a chance to really shine. This doesn’t mean you have to get the rid of the things you love—move them to another room, or put them in storage, and then rotate them back in (and take something else out) when you’re ready for a change.

Let your furniture breathe - Try taking furniture pieces and moving them just slightly farther away from one another. Even a few inches can make a big difference. If you have the space, giving your furniture a little extra room to breathe can give your space a lighter, airier, feel. Another trick - Pulling furniture just a few inches away from the wall.

Add flowers - If you look closely, you’ll notice a thing that many of the most beautiful house tour shoots have in common: fresh cut flowers. A touch of the natural adds liveliness and texture to a room, and can help to soften the lines of a modern space. Having fresh flowers all the time could get a bit spendy, but you can achieve the same effect with a houseplant, which is a (hopefully) one-time purchase.

Embrace the diagonal - One way to make a picture a little more exciting is to take one thing in the photo and angle it just a bit. You can try this with furniture pieces like accent chairs or ottomans—there’s no rule that says everything has to sit on a grid. By looking at your home like a stylist, you can unlock the potential that’s been there all along.

The Gastronomic Salt Lake City has shared the Feast Of The Five Senses - The 2019 edition of this event promises to the biggest and best yet – returning for its 15th year in one of the grandest and most unique settings – The Salt Lake Masonic Temple (650 E. South Temple).

The evening usually begins with passed appetizers, cocktails/wine/beer and a silent auction before moving onto a seated multi course dinner with wine pairings (ably selected and supplied by Francis Fecteau). After dinner wrapped up last year we all left with little goodie bags courtesy of Caputo’s Market too. Those participating for the 2019 event so far include: Shon Foster – Sego Restaurant, Logen Crew – SLC Eatery, Alan Brines – Current Fish & Oyster, Mariah Christensen & Casey Bowthorpe – Harmons, Park City Culinary Institute, Buzz Willey – Pallet, Nathan Powers – Bambara, Adam Kreisel – Chaia Cucina and Romina Rasmussen – Les Madeleines. Tickets are priced $125 per person with wine pairings priced $25 extra. They can be purchased online here.

Celebrate The Bounty - If you can’t wait for October, this yearly celebration of local producers is back for another go around come September 26th from 7-9 pm. The event moved to the new Caffe Molise digs in 2018, and will reprise that location for 2019. The event is a fundraiser for Local First Utah and the 2019 party will partner local restaurants with local distillers/bars. Food only tickets are priced $65, food and drink tickets are $75 and VIP tables (seating for eight guests) are are available for $1,000. Tickets are on sale at www.localfirst.org/celebratethebounty.

Oktoberfest 2019 - An increasing number of local operations are getting in on the Bavarian festivities for 2019. Make sure your stein never runs empty – and be sure to keep note on the following events:

Snowbird - The granddaddy of all Utah Oktoberfest events. Snowbird’s Oktoberfest attracts thousands of visitors each year making it one of the largest festivals in Utah. Admission to Oktoberfest is free and the event runs from noon – 6 p.m every Saturday and Sunday now through October 20th. More details.

T.F. Brewing -Bavarian food provided by Beltex Meats, pretzels and treats… and of course…plenty of German style biers. Ticket includes entry into the event and a special edition glass to take home. Tickets $15 in advance, $20 day of. $10 Beltex Bier Brats with side. Pretzels and other snacks will be available. Event is 21 and over and will be held on September 28th and 29th. More details.

4th West Oktoberfest - Also on Saturday and Sunday 28/29th – this 2-day festival features live music from local artists, local Salt Lake Valley food trucks, Utah vendors, and fun for the whole family. Games will include giant jenga, corn hole, children’s activities, and much more! Enjoy the music, the eats, and all over fun with natural, gluten-free ciders from Mountain West Hard Cider and beers from Red Rock Brewery. More details.

The Woodward

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Sep 18, 2019

The nation’s first all-in-one action sports & ski resort is set to open in Park City for the 2019-20 winter season with their grand opening party on December 14th. The Woodward Park City, will feature a fully integrated and state-of-the-art campus, complete with indoor and outdoor action sports venues for year-round adventure. Part of the POWDR portfolio of adventure lifestyle businesses and conveniently located just 27 miles from Salt Lake City International Airport, Woodward Park City will be open 365 days and nights a year starting this 2019-20 winter season.

The first of its kind and located in one of North America’s premier adventure destinations, Woodward Park City is imagined from the ground up to encourage intuitive growth and progression in 10 different sports and activities including: snowboarding, skiing, tubing, mountain biking, skateboarding, BMX, scooter, parkour, cheer and digital media.

“Woodward Park City is for all athletes from families and never-evers to pros,” says Shaydar Edelmann, Woodward Park City general manager. “Our progression-based facilities enable visitors of all skill levels to learn and achieve their goals in a dedicated environment.” Woodward Park City will offer a variety of ways for passionate action sports athletes of all ages and abilities to play. From lift-accessed snowboarding, skiing and tubing in the winter to biking and skating in the summer Woodward Park City will

be on every Utah visitor’s must-do bucket list. Access will be available through all-access passes, day sessions, lift tickets, drop-in sessions, day camps, lessons, monthly memberships, and special events. Monthly memberships are available now for the introductory rate of $100/month. Source: Woodward Park City

We still have a week until summer bids us farewell, but with major retailers already rolling out new Halloween items and the buzz about the arrival of pumpkin spice lattes spreading by the day, it’s clear that quite a few people are prepared to embrace the upcoming season.

Here’s When Fall Foliage Will Look Its Best Near You, So You Can Plan Your Leaf Peeping - Fall lovers are undoubtedly looking forward to the usual changes (and an excuse to break those cozy sweaters out of storage), namely when the first huge cool snap will occur and when to expect the fall foliage to transform from lush green into beautiful shades of orange, red and yellow.

In anticipation of the leaf-changing watch, SmokyMountains.com has updated its annual fall foliage predictive map, an interactive, algorithm-based tool that forecasts the exact moment when “peak fall” will arrive at any location in the continental U.S. So, precisely how accurate is this leaf color-changing predictor? According to data scientist Wes Melton, the factors vary but the map—which is produced from scratch every year—becomes more accurate as time passes.

“Although the scientific concept of how leaves change colors is fairly simple, predicting the precise moment the event will occur is extremely challenging. The major factors impacting peak fall are sunlight, precipitation, soil moisture and temperature. Although we cannot control Mother Nature and ensure 100% accuracy, our data sources are top-tier and each year we refine our algorithmic model achieving higher accuracy over time.”

For anyone interested in finding out when autumn will arrive in all its brilliant colorful glory this year, simply use the date selector at the bottom of the map to see precisely how fall will progress over a particular region in the US. As one of the only fall leaf prediction tools available, the map “will enable travelers to take more meaningful fall vacations, capture beautiful fall photos and enjoy the natural beauty of autumn,” SmokyMountains says. In other words, this map will help fall lovers create lasting vacation memories, snap Instagram-worthy photos and enjoy the season to the fullest.

Here are the Current Mortgage Rates for Utah from Fairway Mortgage - enjoy.

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Skyscrapers

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Sep 11, 2019

Last week we shared that the millennial population represents approximately 23 percent of the Utah population which makes sense that Downtown Salt Lake City is increasingly a hub for young, tech-savvy workers who live and play among the skyscrapers. The Salt Lake Tribune shares that Salt Lake City’s downtown is thriving — and changing. Young, educated and tech-smart workers are moving into condos and apartments close to their jobs and a host of new restaurants, bars and theaters across the business core.

A new study, commissioned by the Downtown Alliance, representing merchants in the heart of Salt Lake City, has documented that growth in the working-age population, comparing it to other large cities in the West. Its key finding: Utah’s downtown workforce is more tech based but also on the lower end of the national salary scale for that sector.

The availability of highly skilled workers is a leading factor — more important than office rents or other metrics — for companies deciding to locate in Salt Lake City, said Matthew Vance, senior research director and economist for CBRE, who led the research. And as Salt Lake City’s downtown continues to flourish along with Utah’s overall economy, that talent pool is giving it a competitive edge among major cities such as Denver, Portland, Seattle, Boise, Omaha and Austin. It is also pushing related growth in markets for office space, residential units, hospitality and retail outlets. “Job growth is the driving force for all things real estate,” Vance said.

Matt Baldwin, board chairman for the Downtown Alliance, said “the future for Salt Lake City’s downtown has never been brighter. The economy is growing and the skyline is rising.” Baldwin noted that five major high-rise projects would get underway in 2020, adding nearly 100 stories to the skyline between them, along with 2 million square feet of new office space and hundreds of apartments and hotel rooms.

Along with the pending renovation of the Salt Lake Temple by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he said, those projects will make next year the city’s “Year of the Construction Crane.” Commissioned by the Downtown Alliance and conducted by analysts at real estate firm CBRE, the study finds that Utah’s capital ranks high among comparable cities, many with larger populations, for the recent growth in its working-age population.

Those workers are younger — median age just above 32 — and have more technology degrees per capita than their counterparts in at least six other metropolitan areas. And at least in the technology sector, the average wages in a range of top jobs are lower here than in Seattle, Denver, Portland and Austin, CRBE found. Only similar workers in Omaha and Boise had lower average wages, at $70,349 and $66,556 yearly, respectively, compared to Salt Lake City’s average annual wage of $71,710.

This probably why Salt Lake City is also the Best City for Young Entrepreneurs. Small Biz Trends shares which cities are most popular with young entrepreneurs between the ages of 25 and 34 and Salt Lake City comes in first. The rankings reflect the percentage of young entrepreneurs to the overall population in metropolitan areas of the United States with over 50,000 people. We also identify factors such as industry clusters, lifestyle, infrastructure, costs, workforce availability and a thriving entrepreneurial community nearby.

1. Salt Lake City - Known for its booming tech industry leading to the area’s designation as part of the Silicon Slopes, Salt Lake City is a magnet in the western U.S. for young entrepreneurs. Today, 1,973 young entrepreneurs call the city home, accounting for .17% of the population. Plenty of networking and a welcoming business community are hallmarks of Salt Lake City. Entrepreneurs like Robert Brady, the Founder of Righteous Marketing says he travels from his home base in Idaho down to Salt Lake regularly to network and connect with other entrepreneurs. “They are an amazing group of people.”

2. Oklahoma City - Often called simply OKC, the city is also OK with young entrepreneurs.

3. Denver - Millennial migration to Denver is now well documented. So the presence of so many young entrepreneurs in the metro area is a no-brainer.

4. Seattle - The city that launched Kurt Cobain and the Grunge revolution is still young at heart.

5. Los Angeles - LA is home to 15,409 young entrepreneurs. That may make it sound like the city deserves a higher ranking here. But in the behemoth that Los Angeles is, that number represents only .12% of the metro population.

6. Portland - Oregon’s largest city keeps young entrepreneurs busy and when not working on their businesses, these young entrepreneurs have plenty to do in Portland’s unique culture that celebrates “weird.”

7. Tampa - The city’s major industries include finance, retail and insurance, But the local economy is also buoyed up by shipping, national defense, professional sports, tourism and real estate.

8. Minneapolis - The city trails only Chicago and Detroit as the largest economic centers in the Midwest. And it is home to such Fortune 500 companies as Target, U.S. Bancorp and Ameriprise Financial.

9. San Diego - San Diego is named for a Spanish saint but the metro area is clearly revered by young entrepreneurs as well.

10. San Jose - Located in California’s Silicon Valley, the area is already known for tech entrepreneurs. And there are many young entrepreneurs too — a total of 2,156 of them work in the metro area making up .11% of the population.

Sometimes we need to relax and here are 6 Tremendous Spa Treatments for the Athlete (and Weekend Warrior) by Park City Magazine. Recover from hard-charging, on-mountain fun with these specialty massages, salty floats, and more.

Foot Zoning

Park City Massage and Spa (formerly Silver Mountain Spa) In addition to all the classic spa treatments, Park City Massage and Spa’s robust menu offers everything from jet lag recovery to Cranial Sacral Therapy to body mapping. One unique option for athletes is Foot Zoning, done by intuitive wellness and certified foot zone therapist Wendy Wise. Using massage that taps into the nerves on your feet (which connect to corresponding areas in your body), foot zoning “improves circulation and the body’s ability to communicate with itself and detoxify,” Wise says. “We nickname it the ‘Ph.D. level of reflexology’ because people have heard of reflexology, but it’s much more than that—it’s easiest to understand once you experience it.” By focusing on your feet, Wise says she can strategically open structural space and help oxygenate the entire body. You’ll learn a lot about your immune and hormonal systems and overall health in the process, too.

Alpine Body Rescue

Spa Montage Deer Valley To alleviate muscle pain and tension from outdoor endeavors, Spa Montage Supervisor Dominic McKenzie recommends the Alpine Body Rescue, a strong-pressure massage that includes a therapeutic heat pack and aromatic blend to relieve neck and shoulder tension. For a more relaxing head-to-toe treatment, he also suggests the Seasonal Renewal, a blend of full-body exfoliation and dry brushing followed by a hot stone massage and grounding foot treatment.

Float Therapy

SYNC Float Center Athletes have long used Epsom salt baths to recover from hard workouts, and float therapy amplifies those pain-relieving benefits. During a 30- or 60-minute float, you’ll be immersed in a pod filled with water and 1,000 pounds of magnesium sulfate, which allows you to float on the surface. “There are three different therapies going on during a float,” explains SYNC co-owner Justin Hunter. “Magnesium absorbs into the skin and helps relax tension and lowers stress response, facilitates healing, and increases antioxidant production.” Also, the water allows you to spread out over the surface and elongates your muscles—great for compressive sports like mountain biking or skiing—and the sensory reduction enhances focus, clarity, and creativity. “Research has shown that an hour float is equal to four hours of sleep as far as what the body can get done,” Hunter says.

High Mountain Foot Recovery

The Spa at Hotel Park City Runners and hikers putting in high mileage should consider the High Mountain Foot Recovery, a therapeutic 25-minute massage that combines reflexology techniques with a skin hydration treatment. Hotel Park City also has a full lineup of treatments, including skin, hair, and nails, with a sauna and eucalyptus steam room to relax in afterwards.

Ninety-Nine 90 Therapeutic Leg Recovery

RockResorts Spa at The Grand Summit, Park City Mountain Named after the iconic expert lift at Park City Mountain, this leg-focused massage (50 or 80 minutes) at Canyons Village’s RockResorts Spa is useful for yes, skiers, but also anyone who uses his or her leg muscles in a big way. “The therapists focus on the legs to move out the lactic acid and they know which muscles need to get worked on the most based on what activities the athlete is doing,” says spa concierge Sally Smith. The treatment includes a cooling aromatic compress on your legs in combination with targeted compressions, stretching, and pressure-point massage to regenerate muscles and eliminate swelling.

CBD Massage Experience

Align Spa Tapping into the anxiety-reducing and pain-relieving properties of CBD, Align Spa allows you to upgrade your massage—Swedish, Reflexology, Deep Tissue, and more—with a CBD experience. Using wide spectrum raw hemp, CBD oil is incorporated into your full-body massage followed by a custom tea blended with CBD, and a take-home muscle relief or calming bath bomb.

Oktoberfest

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Sep 04, 2019

The kids are back in school and nights are getting cooler, Snowbird reminds us that it is time for Oktoberfest and it’s about more than just bending elbows. Oktoberfest at Snowbird is a family-friendly affair with activities, food, and, of course, brews for days — weeks actually. The highly-anticipated festival is now open and lasts through mid-October, taking place every Saturday and Sunday. It’s probably the greatest beer festival Utah has to offer, so don’t miss out! Snowbird’s Oktoberfest attracts thousands of visitors each year making it one of the largest festivals in Utah. Admission to Oktoberfest is free and the event runs from Noon - 6 pm.

The origins of Oktoberfest date back to 19th-century Bavaria, when King Ludwig called for a state fair in Munich to celebrate his autumn marriage. Here in Utah, it wasn’t until 1973 — 2 years after Snowbird opened — when the festival took root.

The annual festival includes a biergarten offering more than 50 varieties of beer. This includes traditional German-style beers and those made by Utah breweries, including Moab Brewery, Bohemian, Uinta and Squatters. Oktoberfest food choices include select German favorites, such as bratwurst, weisswurst, sauerkraut, apple strudel, spaetzle, beef rouladen, pretzels and Bavarian roasted almonds.

Coming up September 13-14 Park City becomes home to "The Best Little Mountain Music Festival in America". The Utah Daily Chronicle shares Park City Songwriter Festival Focuses on the Storytelling of Music. The inaugural Park City Songwriter Festival, crafted for devoted listeners of America’s greatest musicians, was founded in-part by songwriter Aaron Benward as a celebration of his favorite aspects of songs and the intimate stories behind them.

Benward is no stranger to the bright lights and big stages of the music industry. He first entered the music scene as a Christian Contemporary artist as part of a father-son duo, Aaron Jeoffrey. The two released several studio albums and produced numerous chart-topping singles before Benward debuted as a solo act with his album “Imagine.” Even with his music’s acclaim, Benward remains passionate about the closeness of songs and connecting listeners to what he calls, “the heroes of music — the songwriters.” This drive inspired his co-created “Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind the Song” events, where listeners and musicians alike share their love for music.

It’s fitting, then, that the Park City Songwriter Festival was dreamt up in the same way. In tandem with friends Ben Anderson and Scott Thompson, Anderson has been developing the event since January 2018. Anderson’s focus remains in promoting concerts for music lovers, as the president of the non-profit Mountain Town Music and bassist in his own Nashville band Aiko. Thompson, as a music fan himself, owns two of the venues on Main Street — O.P. Rockwell, where Western music hall meets Victorian speakeasy, and the Rockwell Listening Room, converted to an up-close and personal venue.

Though this celebration of country and folk music takes place away from the music’s Nashville roots, Benward describes Park City as the perfect location for the event. “This is the perfect spirit and environment to experience music in its most organic form, with the venues all located along Main Street.” Patrons can easily move through downtown Park City and the unique atmospheres of five distinct venues — something that could only work in the heart of one of Utah’s most popular destinations.

However, the personal environment of the festival shouldn’t lure attendees into overlooking the sheer talent of the lineup. Featuring spectacular headliners like “bayou soul” artist Marc Broussard, New-Orleans based guitarist Anders Osbourne and long-running band the North Mississippi AllStars, the festival artists — over 40 in number — boast a combined total of 17 Grammy wins, 12 Academy of Country Music Awards, 11 American Country Awards wins and five Hall of Famers, among many other accolades.

The PCSF has even partnered with outreach organizations such as the Recording Academy’s MusiCares and Osbourne’s Send Me a Friend to support professionals in the music industry, placing a charity focus on the festival to help artists struggling with mental health issues or addiction recovery that often go unnoticed.

One cornerstone of the PCSF that makes it different from any other festival is its honesty. Founded by music lovers, to share music’s bare-bones and to connect talented storytellers to their listeners, the atmosphere of the event is sure to be magical. As Benward said, “There’s nothing like being up close and personal to music at its core – the song. No smoke and mirrors, no lights and walls of sound. Just the songwriter on a stool with their instrument of choice, up close and personal.”

The festival will be held on Sept. 13-14 on Main Street in Park City, Utah. The two-day event features dozens of performances and workshops in the five venues. There are three ticket tiers, including various levels of access to reservations, dinners, nightly concerts and swag. Tickets are still available and can be purchased here or through the festival’s website.

Utah Business shares that Utah Has More Millennials Than Any Other State. Utah’s millennial population represents approximately 23 percent of the state (726,000 people). Roughly one in every four Utahns is a millennial?a higher percentage than in any other state. As a cohort, Utah’s millennial population is 20 percent larger than the state’s Gen-X population and 39 percent larger than the state’s baby boomer population. Which begs the question: How does Utah’s large millennial population impact Utah?

While the definitions of generational cohorts vary, a common definition of the millennial generation includes anyone born between 1981 and 1996 (ages 23 to 38 in 2019). They are called millennials because they reached adulthood around the turn of the 21st Century. They are old enough to remember the 9/11 terrorist attacks and many of them entered the workforce during the Great Recession. These and other events shaped their world view.

Some people joke about millennials as self-absorbed, entitled, and eager for instant gratification. Maybe there is some truth to that, but they also set a great example for the rest of us in the way they value Mother Earth, promote work-life balance, and appreciate diversity. Millennials are also better educated than prior generations, especially among women.

The Salt Lake Chamber recently asked in their CEOutlook (a quarterly survey of a diverse mix of Utah CEOs) how Utah’s young workforce impacts their business and hiring practices. The results were at once telling, discouraging, and inspiring.

One CEO wrote: “With our younger population, we find we have to engage them more proactively because they want to be involved and challenged.” Another said younger workers “want to make a difference in the community” and not just collect a paycheck. I love that Utah’s younger workforce chooses to be civically engaged.

Another CEO said she sees a trend toward more flexible hours and more emphasis on early career benefits such as child care and maternity leave. I see this as an important step for families.

Several CEOs opined about the different work behaviors of millennials. They commented on the “lack of long-term commitment in the workforce” and “more frequent turnover.” This matches some of the behaviors I’ve observed as well. I think employers need to adapt to this changing reality by helping to improve work-life balance and making work more than a place to collect a paycheck.

CEOs also commented on the mismatch between expectations and skill levels. One said, “the younger workforce has higher expectations of job perks and benefits, but lack essential skills to perform at an average level.” Another said, “millennials have a very different view of the workplace. They want more for less. That is a challenge in an environment where client budgets are shrinking and clients are asking more for less.” Ouch… perhaps millennials too need to adapt to economic realities.

Looking to the future, I’m struck by three observations. First, let’s relish Utah’s young, diverse, tech-savvy, healthy, and community-minded population. It’s a competitive advantage for us. Second, let’s adapt to the changing realities presented by this large, curious, multi-tasking, open-minded, connected, and environmentally keen generation. We have much to learn from them.

And finally, let’s remember something I learned from studying the work of Pew. Michael Dimock says, “generations are a lens through which to understand societal change, rather than a label with which to oversimplify differences between groups.” Within each generational label are individuals working each day to fulfill their potential. Let this truth be our guide.

Home Tips & Bike Rides

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 28, 2019

This week we have a few DIY updates for your kitchen that won't break the bank, four things you should not skimp on when buying a home and the skinny on where to drop in for a weekly bike ride, hail a guide, demo some wheels, or take a lesson in Park City.

For many people, Apartment Therapy shares that a kitchen is a lot more than where you reheat leftovers or wash dishes. It’s where you sit and catch up with an old friend over a glass of rosé. It’s where the kids do their homework after school. It’s the heart (and, yes, stomach) of your house, so it’s important your kitchen is somewhere you actually want to spend time in. While renovating your kitchen is one way to get the space of your dreams, it can cost you a pretty penny. In fact, HomeAdvisor found the average kitchen renovation can cost anywhere between $12,594 and $33,118. Yikes!

Fortunately, you don’t have to shell out the big bucks for a space you truly love. Below are some hacks for a stylish upgrades for a fraction of the price.

Take Cover - Unless you created your space from scratch, there’s a good chance you didn’t have a say in what cabinet doors are in your kitchen. The good news is you’re not stuck with ‘em forever. Swapping out your cabinet doors is a surprisingly easy task that will completely transform your kitchen’s look. Now, all you need to do is find a door that tugs at your design heartstrings. We have a few suggestions.

Cool Knobs - Another way to spice up your kitchen cabinets? Replacing the knobs. A great alternative for D.I.Y. rookies, changing your knobs is a great way to add a personal touch to a pre-furnished home or rental space. You could select one knob and stick with it, but we think mixing and matching different will give your kitchen a cool, bohemian vibe.

Pegged for Greatness - If you’re always whipping up delicious recipe after delicious recipe, you don’t have the time to sift through your drawers to find your favorite sauce pot or paring knife. Instead, you need all your essentials right where you can see ‘em. Hanging a pegboard from your wall is not only practical, but it’ll make your space feel like a professional chef’s kitchen. (Fun fact: Julia Child was a pegboard fan.)

Beautiful Backsplash - No, your backsplash doesn’t have to be set in stone. Thanks to a range of peel-and-stick tile decals, you can change your backsplash as often you self-clean your oven. From traditional subway tile, to sleek marble, to a funky mosaic, there’s bound to be a backsplash that complements your design style. (Psst… you can check out some of our favorite, out-of-the-box backsplash ideas here.)

Stylish Shelving - You don’t have to be a design guru to know that open shelves are one of the biggest kitchen trends around. Fortunately, you don’t need to undergo a big renovation project to bring these into your space. Easy to install, these shelves will give your kitchen a stylish touch and max out your space’s storage capacity. And don’t worry, renters: There are plenty of adhesive options for you, too.

Let There Be Light - We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: Lighting can make or break a room — and no, we’re not just talking about the brightness of your bulbs or number of light sources. Upgrading your space’s standard flush mount will create a “wow” factor, convincing your guests that you put a lot more work into your kitchen than you really did. Check out these unique lighting ideas that will illuminate your space.

If you are in the market for a new place - there are Four Things You Shouldn’t Skimp on When Buying a Home, According to Real Estate Experts - Apartment Therapy.

Buying a home is expensive. But, cheaping out may save you in the short term, but it can cause major headaches—and end up being way more expensive—in the long run. Here are four things you should never skimp on when buying a home, according to real estate experts:

Electric work - You need electricity for a variety of daily tasks, so don’t take any shortcuts when it comes to the electrical setup in your home. According to Gill Chowdhury of Warburg Realty, upgraded electrical in older homes is necessary to support modern conveniences many of us take for granted, such as a washer and dryer and central air conditioning.

The location - The old refrain of “location, location, location” is not just an empty adage. If you stretch the bounds of where you really want to live, you’ll likely be disappointed down the road. Bernstein points out while that you can always modify your home with additions and renovations, where that house is located is set in stone.

“Living in a better location might save you 20 minutes (each way) in commuting, which will add up to thousands of hours you can have back in your life,” says Martin Eiden, a real estate agent with Compass in New York City.

Homeowners insurance - You probably already know that homeowners insurance is a must, but you should also keep in mind that any old policy will not necessarily do. “While insurance is required by lenders, that doesn’t stop homeowners from skimping on the coverage amount to save money every month,” says John Holloway, co-founder of NoExam.com, a digital insurance brokerage. In lieu of reducing coverage, Holloway recommends reducing your rate by taking preventative measures. For example, a security system with monitoring for police and fire can cut your rates by about five percent. Similarly, cutting down dangerous trees or updating your plumbing or electrical work reduces your chances of making a claim, and in turn, your rates.

“Always maintain replacement cost value coverage, which would cover the replacement cost on the loss of your personal property as well as the structure,” advises Tara King of HomeSmart Cherry Creek Properties in Greenwood Village, Colorado.

The inspection- The inspection is another necessary part of the home-buying process that should not be taken lightly. “A whole home inspector is going to walk through a very long and exhaustive list of items to check,” says Taylor. “They may not see everything, but they’re likely to see things that you cannot. These detailed inspections can protect you form problems that even the seller didn’t know about, and therefore didn’t disclose to you.” Buying a home is difficult enough, so don’t skip an inspection to save a few hundred dollars when it could end up saving you thousands.”

Park City has amazing bike trails and Park City Magazine has the skinny on where to drop in for a weekly bike ride, hail a guide, demo some wheels, or take a lesson.

Drop in for a free weekly ride - White Pine Touring (1790 Bonanza Drive, 435.649.8710, whitepinetouring.com) leads guided rides on Tuesdays (for women only) and Thursdays (co-ed). For the skinny tire set, Cole Sport (1615 Park Ave, 435.649.4806, colesport.com) leads a Monday night road ride for intermediate and advanced riders. Stay Park City (stayparkcitycycling.com) organizes a slew of guided rides throughout the week—MTB, gravel, and road—most of which start deliciously at Ritual Chocolate. Though a bit more sporadic in timing, Silver Star Ski & Sport (1825 Three Kings Dr, 435.645.7827,

silverstarskiandsport.com) leads a one-hour, easygoing cruise along the neighborhood’s paved trail system, starting and ending at the shop, as a part of the signature “Cruiserpalooza” festivities.

Take a lesson - Deer Valley Resort’s Mountain Bike School (2250 Deer Valley Drive South, 435.645.6648, deervalley.com) is essentially ski school for bikers, where seasoned coaches steer all levels of riders through the single-track and downhill learning curve. For small fries, Young Riders’ (youngriders.com) summer programs typically sell out early, but both Park City Recreation (parkcity.org) and Basin Recreation (basinrecreation.org) roll out dirt jump and children’s MTB camps, respectively. For a female-focused experience, Women in the Mountains (womeninthemountains.com) has clinics for all levels led by former pro and certified professional mountain bike instructor Erica Tingey and her fellow coaches.

Hail a guide - Plenty of local outfits offer expert-led rides (beyond the aforementioned freebies). For a unique adventure, check out White Pine Touring’s bike-and-fish combo that starts with a killer descent down the WOW Trail followed by a guide-delivered lunch, gear change, and fly fishing on the Provo.

Try out some new wheels - Demos, offered at most cycling outfits, are a great way for gearheads to get their fix or for newbies to see what style best suits their needs. Storm Cycles (1153 Center Drive, Suite G140, 435.200.9120, stormcycles.net), offers free demos on June 2 (also the shop’s grand opening at its new home), June 30, Aug 11, and Sept 29.

Don a bib - If you want to soak in local, zany (and challenging) tradition, register for the costume-bedecked Tour de Suds (mountaintrails.org). Fear not, you have all summer to train for the 2,700 feet of vertical (and pint-hoisting). For an all-levels race, check out the Midweek MTB Series (midweekmtb.com). Cross-country and mini-enduro racers are divided by class, so newbies won’t be steamrolled by the pros, plus there are free kids’ races packed into the fun. For a supported ride, the National Ability Center’s Summit Challenge (summitchallenge100.org) is a feel-good, all-inclusive event with a choice of four courses, ranging from 16 to 100 miles. If you really want to test your mettle, gear up for the annual, grueling, 75-mile Park City Point 2 Point (thepcpp.com), or sign onto The Ultimate Challenge, which allows amateurs a 94-mile or 44-mile sniff of the Tour of Utah experience, tourofutah.com.

Golfing In Park City

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 20, 2019

School has started, but there is still time in the season for golf. Park City Magazine shares where to putt, drive, and roll with the greens in Park City. But, before we get to golfing we wanted to let our readers know that the Parley’s Summit wildlife overpass is working! Click on the Facebook link from the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources to see deer, lions and bears - oh my. https://www.facebook.com/UtahDWR/videos/490781644940678/

Wasatch Mountain Golf Course (975 W Golf Course Dr, Midway, 435.654.0532,) is set among the stunning unspoiled scenery of Wasatch Mountain State Park with two public courses and low fees that take the pressure off. Duff away an afternoon with the kids, or all by yourself.

Canyons Golf at Park City Mountain’s Canyons Village (3720 N Sundial Ct, Park City, 435.615.4728, parkcitymountain.com) is an 18-hole course on the ski hill that drops 550 feet in elevation. You’ll play from top to bottom puzzling over long, tricky downhill shots.

Soldier Hollow’s Olympic-themed course (1370 W Soldier Hollow Lane, Midway, 435.654.7442, soldierhollowgolf.com) offers a unique configuration with two courses: Gold and Silver. Of the two, the Silver is naturally more forgiving.

Park City Golf Club (1541 Thaynes Canyon Dr, 435.615.5800, parkcity.org) hosts Happy Hour League, featuring monthly four-person scramble tournaments through September. Beats Tinder. And for golfers not seeking a mate, PC Muni has leagues for all ages and stages, plus open tee times on its mountain-flanked 18 holes.

Trailside Park Disc Golf Course (1388 Center Dr, Park City, 435.655.0999) offers nine holes amid the sagebrush hills above the park, with challenges for masters of the disc and easy sight lines for beginners.

And for that really short game, head to Park City Mountain (parkcitymountain.com) grab a putter, and swing away at either of the two 18-hole mini-golf courses, one at each base.

Wine Spectator says these are the 7 best Utah restaurants for wine - Seven Utah restaurants earned top honors last month, when Wine Spectator magazine released its 2019 Restaurant Wine List Awards. Here’s snapshot of Utah’s seven best restaurants for wine in Utah — and 14 other medal winners.

Veneto Ristorante Italiano • This 3-year-old restaurant — which separates itself from other fine-dining restaurants with its no-tipping policy — has about 385 wine selections. Strengths include wines from Tuscany and Piedmont. 370 E. 900 South, Salt Lake City; (801) 359-0708 or www.venetoslc.com.

Tupelo • This farm-to-table restaurant, which also opened in 2016, increased its selections to 375 from 2018. Strengths include wines from California, Italy and France. 508 Main St., Park City; 435-615-7700 or tupeloparkcity.com.

Bangkok Thai on Main • This Park City restaurant has maintained its “best of” status for more than a decade, having first earned it in 2007. It has more than 650 wines in the collection, many that keep the savory and spicy flavors of Thai cuisine in mind. Strengths: wines from California, Bordeaux and Italy. 605 Main (inside Park Hotel), Park City, 435-649-8424 or bangkokthaionmain.com.

Aerie at Snowbird • Located in the Cliff Lodge, this restaurant offers a spectacular view of the mountains and one of the largest wine lists in the state with more than 1,200 offerings. Strengths: wines from California, Burgundy, Bordeaux, Rhône, Italy, Argentina and Oregon. 9600 Little Cottonwood Canyon Road, Salt Lake City; 801-933-2160 or snowbird.com.

Glitretind at Stein Eriksen Lodge • The signature restaurant, inside a Norwegian-inspired lodge, has 1,500 wine selections and has an expert staff willing to help customers navigate the options. Strengths: wines from California, Burgundy, Bordeaux, Rhône, Italy, Oregon and Champagne. 7700 Stein Way, Park City; 435-645-6455 or steinlodge.com.

J&G Grill • The signature restaurant at the St. Regis Deer Valley has 900 wine selections on its list ranging from the industry icons to small producers using new wine-making techniques. Strengths: wines from California, Bordeaux, Burgundy and Italy. 2300 Deer Valley Drive East, Park City; (435) 940-5760 or jggrilldeercrest.com.

Spencer’s for Steaks & Chops • This Salt Lake City steakhouse has nearly 450 wines in the collection. It also does a lot of special ordering of wines that aren’t usually available in Utah’s state-run liquor stores Strengths: wines from California, France and Italy. 255 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City; 801-238-4748 or spencersforsteaksandchops.com.

Award of Excellence • First-time winners include Cucina Toscana in Salt Lake City and Riverhorse on Main in Park City. La Caille at Quail Run also returned to the list in 2019, after a short absence.

Repeat winners include BTG Wine Bar, Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar, Log Haven and Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, all in Salt Lake City; the Steak Pit in Snowbird; 350 Main, Cena Ristorante and Edge Steakhouse in Park City; and Fireside Dining, The Mariposa and Seafood Buffet at Deer Valley Resort.

Feeling romantic, Park City has topped the list of 10 Most Romantic Places To Go For Your Honeymoon On A Budget. Everyone dreams of the perfect wedding, but the perfect honeymoon can be a little harder to come by. With all of your funds spent on the actual ceremony, you're often left with very little to spend on the celebration that's meant to be just for you and your special someone.

Park City, Utah - Why drop a bunch of money on a trip to the Swiss Alps when you can get the same quality experience in Park City, Utah? Another option for couples who love the snow, Park City has awesome slopes for skiing. As far as romantic activities go, you can go snow-shoeing in the moonlight or take a sleigh ride. We mean, when you're not curled up by the fireside watching the snow fall from indoors. Many of the places to stay up there also have not just jacuzzis, but heated pools both indoors and outdoors. The vibe and aesthetic of Park City is high-end like the Swiss Alps, but not nearly as expensive.

Ski Resorts and The Tour of Utah

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 13, 2019

The Deseret News shares that a developer plans to make Utah site the first new full-service ski resort in country since 1980 - By Amy Donaldson. For nearly 40 years, no developer has managed to build and open a new, full-service ski resort, but it’s not because there wasn’t demand for one or a desire to do so.

"I know that the mountains are littered with developers who thought they were going to do something and nothing happened,” said Gary Barnett, founder and chairman of Extell Development Company, who unveiled plans Monday for a ski resort and village that includes hotels, condominiums and residential housing. ”I mean, nothing has really been done in the country in the last 30 years, since Beaver Creek, really. … It’s so hard to do.”

So what makes a guy who doesn’t even ski think he can do what no one else has managed since 1980? A unique set of circumstances and colleagues with a vision.”I think once again, one of the important things for us was the ability to tap into tax increment financing,” he said, referring to the fact that Wasatch County had designated the Mayflower Resort area as a place where Utah’s Military Industrial Development Agency could build a recreation hotel, which returns some of the property tax generated from development to developers in exchange for reduced fees for military personnel.

”The fact that MIDA is there, supporting it and helping speed up the process, was a very necessary component for me to get involved. I would not have gotten involved otherwise,” Barnett said. The project — Mayflower Mountain Resort — is ambitious in its scope, with plans for 5,600 acres that are just west of U.S. 40 and Jordanelle Reservoir (near Exit 8) and adjacent to Deer Valley that includes 1,520 residential units, 825 hotel rooms and commercial units and 600 skier parking spaces.

It will be the first recreation project created to work with the military for the state, said Kurt Krieg, vice president of development. The Military Industrial Development Agency is a state-run economic development entity with a military focus, which in this case, offers ski resort vacation opportunities to military personnel at a fraction of the cost.

Among the advantages the new resort will have is its proximity to one of the state’s top rated resorts — Deer Valley. ”We have the ability to connect to Deer Valley,” Barnett said, noting that Extell just renegotiated a lease of land to Deer Valley that makes the future more predictable for both entities. ”Obviously, they’d have to purchase a Deer Valley ticket, but there is that ability to provide skiing. We feel like the access from our side of the mountain is exceptional.”

The location of Mayflower may offer it some unique advantages that other start-ups don’t enjoy, including 35 minutes and no stop lights from the Salt Lake City International Airport to the freeway exit.

”There is no other resort of this scale, maybe around the world, that I know of that is 35 minutes from a major, international airport,” he said. “It’s going to have access to everywhere. … That’s the No. 1 thing Utah has going for it is this access. And we have straight highway, no traffic lights. … So we’ve got everything in our favor to get this thing done.” The goal is to have the village and some ski runs open within five years.

Extell has discussed climate change challenges, as they planned the development and acquired land, Barnett said. It also hopes to be supportive, if not involved in, Utah’s bid for another Winter Olympics in 2030 or 2034. “We love the idea, and we’d love to be involved in it,” he said. “Anything we do would have to be coordinated with Deer Valley and the state of Utah, but we certainly love the idea of playing a very active role. We hope we get it in 2030.”

Some of what Barnett and his team envision is similar to what’s out there. Some of it is unique. But before they can begin to build anything, they are conducting a voluntary cleanup of the mountain, because the last mining companies left in 1969 without the resources to clean up any contamination. The land has been vacant, even as development occurred around it, in part because of the contamination and in part because it was owned by a foreign trust with a trustee who sought a higher price than anyone was willing to pay.

As the trustees re-negotiated representation, the land became available and then it was a matter of cleaning up the contamination in order to develop it in the ways Extell envisions. On Monday, several members of the Extell team and the Military Industrial Development Agency representatives took media on a tour of the picturesque site, pointing out where ski lifts might be, where water tanks will be installed and how cleanup will work.

In some places, as much as 18 inches of soil is being removed and it will be taken to a central location and capped, as is standard in these types of cases, according to Krieg, who led the tour. While no other full service resort has opened in the U.S. since 1980, about a half dozen terrain parks or ski resorts without on-site lodging have opened, including Cherry Peak, which is 20 minutes outside Logan, and two hours north of Salt Lake City. But nothing like most of Utah’s resorts — and nothing like what Extell has planned for Mayflower Resort.

”We have the makings of a really beautiful resort town,” he said. “And that’s what we’re looking at doing.”

The Tour of Utah is once again scheduled to pedal two of its six legs through Summit County and finish on Main Street in Park City. This year’s race covers 477 miles around northern Utah as racers compete in 13 King of the Mountain climbs up an estimated 37,882 feet, and through another 15 sprint competitions. The main events for Summit County spectators are scheduled to take place on Saturday, Aug. 17, the fifth leg of the race, and Sunday, Aug. 18, the sixth and final stage.

The fifth stage of the race begins at 2:30 p.m. and will loop from the Canyons Village at Park City mountain around the Jordanelle and Rockport reservoirs before heading back to the resort. There will be sprint lines in Kamas and Hoytsville, bracketed by King of the Mountain challenges back up to the Jordanelle and through Browns Canyon.

In the day’s final miles, racers will ride through Kimball Junction up to the Utah Olympic Park and will cut down Bear Hollow drive before a final push along Canyons Resort Drive and High Mountain Road to the finish near the Umbrella Bar in Canyons Village. Frontrunners are expected to finish around 6 p.m. A free concert with Florida-based jazz trio Honey Hounds is set to take place after the awards ceremony at 6:30 p.m.

The route, first introduced in 2012, covers 78.2 miles with 10,000 feet of climbing. Racers will leave from Main Street at approximately 12:30 p.m. and head out of the city to Brown’s Canyon with another sprint line in Kamas before zig-zagging into a 2.1-mile KOM climb through Wolf Creek Ranch. The riders will descend into Wasatch County down to Heber, entering the race’s final sprint section in Midway before the grueling six-mile climb along Pine Canyon Road up to Empire Pass. After topping out, racers will ride the switchbacking descent down Marsac Avenue and race up Main Street to the finish line.

“We’re excited to have the Tour of Utah returning to Main Street,” said mayor Andy Beerman via email. “Main Street is an iconic finish to a race that not only highlights amazing athletes, but also Utah’s most spectacular landscapes.” For more information go to TourofUtah.com.

It’s official: Deer Valley is hosting another freestyle World Cup this winter. The U.S. Ski and Snowboard sent out a press release confirming the FIS winter schedule, including the Intermountain Healthcare Freestyle International, on Feb. 6-8. The Freestyle International will include moguls, aerials and dual moguls competitions, with a viewing area at the top of Deer Valley’s Burns and Snowflake lifts above Snow Park Lodge. This year will be the 20th that Deer Valley has hosted the event, which has become a favorite of athletes and spectators.

“Deer Valley is honored to have been selected as a venue for another freestyle skiing World Cup and to be able to continue our long tradition of hosting these international competitions,” said Emily Summers, a spokeswoman for Deer Valley in an email. “We are looking forward to welcoming the mogul and aerial teams back to Deer Valley in 2020.”

The resort was the host site for the 2019 World Championships and has a storied past in freestyle skiing. It was where Jonny Moseley performed the Dinner Roll during the 2002 Olympics, spurring a rules change to allow inversions, and where Mikael Kingsbury became the winningest moguls skier in history last year.

The event is particularly pertinent to the U.S. freestyle teams, which are based out of Park City and consider the venue their home turf. At the World Championships in February, Americans Brad Wilson and Jaelin Kauf both medaled in dual moguls.

The U.S. Alpine team will host the HomeLight Killington Cup on Nov. 30 through Dec. 1 in Vermont. That event is followed on the Alpine calendar by Birds of Prey at Beaver Creek in Colorado on Dec. 6 through 8.

In cross-country skiing, the Fastenal Parallel 45 Winter Festival in Minneapolis will be held over four days in March, including a music festival, panel discussions and the first cross-country World Cup to come to the U.S. in 19 years. The longstanding drought was broken thanks to the U.S. team’s performance at the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Games, where Jessie Diggins and Kikkan Randall took home the nation’s first-ever gold.

The World Cup cross-country freestyle sprint event will be held on March 17, and will act as the second leg of a mini sprint tour that begins in Quebec City the weekend before.

The freeskiing and snowboarding World Cup halfpipe season is scheduled to begin at Copper Mountain on Dec. 11-14.

On Jan. 29 to Feb. 1, skiers and boarders will compete in slopestyle and halfpipe at Mammoth Mountain in California. One more major freeski and snowboarding event will be added to the U.S. calendar in the coming weeks, the press release stated.

“Fans of ski and snowboard sports have a lot to look forward to in the coming season, especially here in the U.S.,” said U.S. Ski and Snowboard President and CEO Tiger Shaw in the press release. “We have the cross-country World Cup coming back to America for the first time in nearly 20 years with the event in Minneapolis in March. That is going to be an awesome event, giving Jessie Diggins, Sophie Caldwell, Sadie Bjornsen and their teammates (including Park City’s Rosie Brennan) the opportunity to race at World Cup level on home soil for the first time in their careers, in front of thousands of people.”

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Water Fun

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 07, 2019

Summer is in full swing and with school starting just around the corner, Park City Magazine shares 13 cool spots for a hot day. Swimming equals all-day entertainment, exercise, and unplugged family bonding. Here’s the lowdown on splash-worthy spots.

Au Naturel

Nearby Reservoirs stateparks.utah.gov/parks/

For a refreshing dip, head to Deer Creek, Jordanelle, Echo, and Rockport. “Rockapulco” (Rockport) usually has the warmest temps, while Jordanelle is the coldest—but also deepest and most scenic—and boasts the Aqua x Zone (435.962.9663, aquaxzone.com), an inflatable watersports Wibit.

Bloods Lake, Bonanza Flat Park at the new lot on Guardsman Pass (one mile east of the old pullout) for an easy-ish, 1.7-mile hike to the small, clean lake. County leash laws are in effect.

Smith and Morehouse Reservoir, Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest, Oakley, 435.783.4338, fs.usda.gov/uwcnfA long reservoir with calm waters, gorgeous views, fishing, and the occasional rope swing left by locals.

Local Pools
Basin Recreation Fieldhouse, 1388 Center Dr, 435.655.0999, basinrecreation.org
Power through laps in the outdoor pool, hot tub it, or play on the free splash pad. A pool lifeguard is usually on duty.
Ecker Hill Aquatic Center, 2465 Kilby Rd, 435.645.5617, pcschools.us/community/aquatic-center
Go indoors for an eight-lane lap pool, diving, SCUBA, and stand-up paddleboard yoga classes and a small pool for littles. Ecker isn’t a lounging place, but a lifeguard is on duty, so you can drop off kids (over age 12).
The MARC (Park City Municipal Athletic and Recreation Center), 1200 Little Kate Rd, 435.615.5400, parkcity.org
Cool off at this family-friendly, outdoor leisure pool with a slide, a hot tub, and a lazy river, plus a six-lane lap pool. Midafternoon can feel crowded.

Silver Mountain Sports Club & Spa, 1526 W Ute Blvd, Park City, 435.575.0350, silvermountainspa.com

Revel in two heated lap pools, a 65-foot waterslide, a lazy river, and indoor/outdoor hot tubs.

Nearby Aquatic Adventures

Homestead Crater, 700 North Homestead Dr, Midway, 435.657.3840, homesteadresort.com

Venture into a 55-foot-tall, 10,000-year-old limestone dome for a plunge in geothermal waters. Swim, SCUBA, snorkel, soak, or practice paddleboard yoga.

South Summit Aquatic Center (a.k.a. The Kamas Pool), 350 East 200 South, Kamas, 435.783.2423, ssafc.org
Swirl through the waterslide or enjoy the lazy river, kiddie splash area, lap pool, and hot tub (all indoors). Closed on Sundays.

Wasatch Aquatic Center, 200 East 800 South, Heber, 435.654.3450, wasatch.edu/aquatic

This indoor facility recently added a leisure pool with slides and features to the existing lap and therapy pools, plus an outdoor splash pad.Looking for another way to cool off, here are some tips for where to drop a line and get a post-river bite for yourself. It’s not hard to get hooked on fly-fishing: the peace of watching a fly floating on the surface of a gently swirling eddy, the thrill of the catch (and release) when silver flashes and your line goes tight, and the pure enjoyment of being one with nature standing in a crystalline river.

MIDDLE GROUND

The Middle Provo River is one of Utah’s finest blue-ribbon fisheries, stretching from Jordanelle to Deer Creek Reservoirs. Great public access is only a 15-minute drive from Park City. Take UT-224 out of Park City to US Hwy 40 East, travel nine miles, and turn right at the light at River Road. Two fisherman’s access areas are right there (one on the right, one on the left) with parking, portable restrooms, and lots of other fishers to swap tales with. You’ll catch brown, cutthroat, and rainbow trout on this beautiful, braided section of river, with lots of easy spots to fish from shore or by shallow wading (depending on water flow). Flies and lures only. Best bets: PMDs, caddis in the evenings, and grasshoppers in late summer.

FARM-TO-TABLE EATS

You’d be happy simply lounging on the deck of the restored, 80-year-old ranch house of Back 40 Ranch House Grill, taking in the beautiful, pastoral views of the Heber/Midway Valley while sipping nothing but the water from their own artesian aquifer, but … with so many farm-to-table, locally sourced ingredients, you’d be remiss if you didn’t order, say, the smoked jalapeño cheddar burger made with beef from the Circle Bar Ranch two pastures away and artisan cheddar from nearby Heber Valley Cheese. Wash it back with a local cold brew from the full bar menu. 1223 US Hwy 40, Heber City, 435.654.3070, back40utah.com 

GET YOUR FEET WET

Each summer Monday evening at 5 p.m. (until Labor Day), Jans Mountain Outfitters hosts free, beginner fly-casting lessons at the ponds at lower Deer Valley (next to the gazebo). You don’t need a reservation, but call ahead and let them know you’re coming so they can bring enough rods (bring your own if you have one). Typically, you’ll end up with a group of 8 to 10 new anglers perfecting their “10 o’clock, 2 o’clock” casting technique. Then, book a guided trip with the fine folks at Jans or Trout Bum 2 for a true fly-fishing experience on a local river. Jans Mountain Outfitters, 1600 Park Ave, 435.649.4949, jans.com; Trout Bum 2, 4343 Hwy 224, 435.658.1166, troutbum2.com.

WHET YOUR APPETITE

After learning how to cast more beautifully than Brad Pitt in A River Runs Through It, reward yourself with a light, lovely repast at Deer Valley Grocery Café. Sit on the outside deck and check out the duckies and stand-up paddleboarders floating by. Mouthwatering faves are the BLT with maple bacon, tomato, artisan greens, and tarragon aioli on toasted nine-grain bread or the open-face albacore tuna melt with local cumin-spiced cheddar, vine-ripened tomato, and cracked grain mustard on sprouted wheat berry bread. DVGC also carries a plethora of gourmet to-go items if you want to pack a picnic. 2250 Deer Valley Dr, 435.615.2400, deervalley.com

WADE “THE WEBE”

Image: Courtesy Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (cc by 4.0)Known as an “urban fishery” since the Weber River runs parallel to I-84 and I-80, a lot of the Weber is private access only, but anglers can enjoy several nice stretches of tailwater with lots of brown trout and mountain whitefish. Try the Creamery Lane access in Coalville (20 minutes from Park City). From I-80 east, take exit 162. Travel west on Icy Springs Road (SR-280) for 0.2 miles. Turn left and travel south on the frontage road that parallels I-80 for approximately 1.3 miles. Cross over Hobson Lane and continue traveling south on the frontage road for an additional 1.4 miles to reach this access point. Flies and lures only. Best bet: caddis.

SWEET FAMILY FUN

The iconic, family-friendly Taggart’s Grill is located in a log house nestled in a beautiful canyon between Morgan and Henefer. Summer grounds are lovely with wandering peacocks and, well, if you didn’t see any fish on your own expedition, a koi pond. Warning: no kids under 16 on the patio due to rattlesnake danger! How’s that for adventure? Taggart’s doesn’t take reservations, so expect a bit of a well-worth-it wait. Try the creamy chicken mushroom artichoke soup, the red chili poppers stuffed with cream cheese and jalapeño sauce, or the shrimp scampi primavera. Save room for the decadent selection of swoon-worthy, homemade desserts. 1105 Taggart Lane, Morgan, 801.829.3837, taggartsgrill.com

Before You Go

License to Fish - Anyone older than 12 must purchase a license to fish in Utah. Purchase one at any of our local fly-fishing shops, Walmart, by downloading the Utah Hunting and Fishing NICUSA app, or online at wildlife.utah.gov. Nonresident three-day license, $24; Utah residents, $16.

Fishing Buddies - Join High Country Fly Fishers (highcountryflyfishers.com), the local chapter of the national Trout Unlimited organization, and be privy to monthly activities including fly-tying classes, guest speakers, women’s-only events, group fishing outings, social hours, conservation activities, and more.

Support a Cause - The 5,000-member-strong Utah Stream Access Coalition works to “promote and assist in all aspects of securing and maintaining public access to Utah’s public waters and streambeds per Utah law.” In other words, if someone builds a McMansion streamside, fishers should still be able to respectfully and politely fish the water in the middle of the stream (without infringing on the private property owner’s turf). (utahstreamaccess.org)

Looking to stay dry - here are some Farmer's Markets that will keep you busy and your tummy full.

DOWNTOWN SALT LAKE FARMERS’ MARKET - Saturdays at the Downtown Salt Lake Farmers Market is the oldest and the largest. Local only farmers and producers offer the freshest local fruits and vegetables as well as a wide variety of grass-fed meats, eggs, dairy, honey, flowers… It’s a busy crowd, so for less stress and first dibs on the good stuff, arrive early, and even better, come on two-wheels and take advantage of their bike valet services. Accepts DUFB. Saturdays, Now – October 19, 8 a.m. – 2 p.m., Historic Pioneer Park, SLC.

LIBERTY PARK MARKET - The Liberty Park Farmers Market helps support local farms and businesses by bringing fresh local produce directly to the Liberty Wells community. A smaller more intimate market experience, offering a handful of fresh produce vendors, eggs and honey, as well as arts and craft vendors. Accepts DUFB. Fridays, Now – October, 4 pm., until dusk, Liberty Park, SLC.

SUGAR HOUSE FARMERS’ MARKET - Going since 2010, the Sugar House Farmers Market has been meeting up at Fairmont Park, with a handful of local food, artists, and fresh produce vendors. It is laid back and casual, a stage with live entertainment is set up for those to walk by or gather around to enjoy. This market is a little hidden gem in the heart of a quickly developing area, so opt for taking the S-Line or Parley’s Trail instead of driving and make an evening out of it. Wednesdays, July -September, 5 p.m. -8 p.m., Fairmont Park, 1040 E Sugarmont Dr., Sugar House.

SUNNYVALE FARMERS’ MARKET - The Sunnyvale Farmers Market is backed by New Roots of Salt Lake City – a subsidiary program of the IRC or International Rescue Committee. Participating farmers gain access to land and are then able to sell their produce at the Sunnyvale Farmers Market. Specializing in ethnic crops, many locally grown vegetables (bean leaves, amaranth, red and daikon radishes, lambsquarter, solanum and pumpkin shoots) are impossible to find at conventional markets and are highly desirable to those who love them. The market also includes a food pantry, free kids lunch and activities, music and is a safe gathering space for all. Saturdays from 12 – 2 p.m. Sunnyvale Park, 4013 S. 700 West, SLC.

WHEELER FARM FARMERS’ MARKET - Sunday mornings are even better if you get out to the Historical Wheeler Farm and peruse their open market. They’ve got a variety of local vendors, food trucks and artisans, and another big draw—lots of open space to park, stroll, picnic, take a peek inside the barn, touch a pig’s wet snout or take a tractor ride. Very kid friendly. Sundays, 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., 6351 S. 900 East, Murray.

PARK SILLY MARKET - The Park Silly Market comes out of hibernation on Sunday, June 2nd. More than 200,000 people are expected to join in the madness this summer as local vendors transform Main Street into an event space. Make room for the lasso-throwing stilt walkers, revelers should be pleased to know that their environmental impact will be minimized through a rigid recycling program and food scraps donated to lucky pigs in Kamas. Sundays, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Main Street, Park City. 

PETERSON FARM MARKET - With a farm established by Farmer Luke Peterson’s Great Great Grandfather and planted in 1871, Food Truck Friday welcomes you to visit the farm and fuel up with dinner provided by a variety of mobile food vendors. While you’re there, the Peterson Market partners up with other Utah growers and food artisans, allowing you to shop and support local commerce. Food Truck Friday starts at 5 p.m., the Peterson Farm Market is open Monday – Saturday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and til 9 p.m. on Fridays. 11887 South 4000 West, Riverton.

Showings In Utah

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 31, 2019

This week we wanted to share 4 Steps to Take Before a Home Showing and where to catch an outdoor movie before the summer ends.

Buyers want to know exactly what they're getting when purchasing a home. As it's a major investment, all potential homebuyers will want to inspect your entire property while keeping an eye out for any signs of damage. What can you do to make sure your home is ready for public scrutiny? Here's what you need to know:

Thoroughly Clean the Home - Before the showing, you should have your home thoroughly cleaned. This means dusting, vacuuming and taking out the trash. It may also mean taking steps to remove smoke or other odors from the air. If walls or other surfaces have mold on them, be sure to clean them prior to an open house. In addition to increasing the odds that someone makes an offer, taking the time to eliminate mold will go a long way toward reducing the risk of potential buyers getting sick.

Take Time to Stage the Home - Prospective buyers want to get an idea as to how a given space within a home can be used. For instance, they may want to see if there's enough room for their bed in the master bedroom or if there's enough room for the couch in the living room. If you have a finished attic or basement, be sure to showcase it as a space a buyer can make good use of.

Remove Potentially Offensive Items - When you show a house, you want to present a neutral look to potential buyers. This may mean getting rid of posters that make political or religious references. You may also want to hide items with sports logos, especially if you live in an area where rivalries are huge. By doing so, you will allow those who visit your home to imagine themselves living in the space without having anything to cloud their vision.

Make Necessary Repairs Before an Open House - If you're planning on making repairs prior to selling the home, do them before allowing anyone to see the space. For instance, you may want to repair the leaking water heater or replace shingles that have fallen off the roof as soon as possible. You should also make sure the garage door opens and closes properly and that all of the lights work.

If you want to sell your home in a timely manner, you must know how to prepare the space for public viewing. Making repairs, removing offensive items and properly staging the property may all increase the odds of selling your home. By taking these steps before a showing, you may very well increase a buyer’s confidence that the home is worth putting an offer on.

The weather in Utah is amazing and before the summer ends here are some places to watch movies in Utah's great outdoors. Arrive early for a good spot and bring blankets, chairs and bug spray. Movies are free and begin at dusk, unless otherwise noted - always check the website before heading out for some of the movies with a further drive time.

The Gateway

July 31: “Despicable Me”

Aug. 7: “Incredibles 2”

Aug. 14: “10 Things I Hate About You”

The Gateway in downtown Salt Lake will be showing a movie every Wednesday night this summer. Bring a blanket and enjoy free popcorn and movies. You can buy food and drinks at The Gateway and enter to win drawings for DVDs and gift cards. All movies will be held at the Olympic Plaza at The Gateway, 10 N. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City. The plaza opens at 7:30 p.m., and movies begin at sunset. For more information, visit shopthegateway.com.

Draper SunCrest

Aug. 3: “Princess and the Frog”

Aug. 9: “The House With a Clock in Its Walls”

Enjoy movies under the stars hosted by SunCrest in Draper. Movies begin at dusk at Village Green Park, 2016 E. Village Green Circle, Draper. For more information, visit facebook.com/suncrestoa.

Kearns

Aug. 2: “Smallfoot,” Chomper’s Cove

Kearns’ Friday Night Flicks hosted by the Kearns Oquirrh Park Fitness Center and the Utah Olympic Oval is back for the summer. Doors open at 8 p.m. and the movies start at sundown. All movies will be held at KOPFC, 5624 Cougar Lane, Kearns. For Chomper’s Cove movies, enter through the south gate. For Park Pavilion movies, enter through the main entrance. Visit kopfc.com for more information.

Magna

Aug. 2: “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part”

Aug. 9: “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World”

Every Friday night, you can come hear free live music followed by a movie in the park. The movie for Aug. 16 hasn’t been announced yet. All events begin at 8 p.m. at Pleasant Green Park, 3270 S. 8400 West, Magna. For more information, visit magnautah.org.

Millcreek

Aug. 2: “Little Rascals Silent Shorts,” Evergreen Park, 2266 E. Evergreen Ave.

Venture Out invites you and your family to enjoy outdoor movies as well as activities, live music, food trucks and more. Activities start at 6 p.m. and movies begin at dusk. For more information, visit ventureout.org.

Murray

Aug 9: “Bumblebee,” Ken Price Ballpark, 270 E. Vine St.

Murray City is showing outdoor movies all summer with food trucks and concessions available. All movies are free, but you need to reserve seats online at mcreg.com for the June 28 and July 19 movies. All movies start at 9 p.m. For more information, visit murray.utah.gov.

Riverton

Aug 2: “Leave No Trace”

Aug. 9: “Incredibles 2”

Aug. 16: “The House With a Clock in its Walls”

Aug. 23: “Dumbo”

Come enjoy food trucks, vendors, entertainment and games before the movies. Friday Fun Nights will be from 6-9 p.m. followed by the movie at dusk for all dates except the first two. The first movie will take place outside the Riverton Hospital, and the second will be held in conjunction with Town Days. All movies but the first will be at Riverton City Park, 12600 S. 1450 West, Riverton. For more information, visit rivertoncity.com.

Snowbird

Aug. 2: “Grease”

Aug. 9: “Goonies”

Watch free movies up in the mountains on Friday nights. Concessions will be available at The Birdfeeder. Movies begin at dusk and will be at the Snowbird Center Plaza Deck, 9385 S. Snowbird Center Drive. For more information, visit snowbird.com

South Jordan

Aug. 9: “Babe,” County Polo Field, 2100 W. 11400 South

Participate in themed activities and stay for the movie afterward. Festivities begin at 7:30 p.m., and the movies begin at dusk. For more information, visit sjc.utah.gov.

Taylorsville

Aug. 10: “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part”

The first movie will be a part of Taylorsville Dayzz and will be held at the Valley Regional Park at 9:30 p.m. All other movies will be at dusk at City Hall, 2600 W. Taylorsville Blvd. For more information, visit taylorsvilleut.gov.

West Valley City

Aug. 9: “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part”

The first movie will be a part of WestFest, June 13-16. There will be popcorn and concessions available. All movies will start at dusk at Centennial Park, 5405 W. 3100 South. For more information, visit wvc-ut.gov.

Hyde Park

Aug. 10: “Incredibles 2”

Once a month this summer, Hyde Park will be showing a free family movie in the park. All movies start at dusk at Lee Park, 200 W. Center, Hyde Park, Cache County. For more information, visit hydepark.utahlinks.org.

Bountiful

Aug. 10: “Mary Poppins Returns”

Join the South Davis Recreation Center for free family movie nights. Popcorn, nachos and drinks will be available to purchase. The events start at 8:30 p.m., and the movie begins at dusk at 550 N. 200 West, Bountiful. For more information, visit southdavisrecreation.com.

Centerville

Aug. 2: “Peter Rabbit”

Aug. 9: “Incredibles 2”

Centerville’s Movies in the Park open to the whole family. All movies start at 9 p.m. at Smith Park, 300 N. 100 East, Centerville. For more information, visit centervilleut.net.

Kaysville

Aug. 16: “Smallfoot”

Kaysville’s Movies in the Park has food trucks, a splash pad and, of course, movies. The event begins at 9 p.m. and will be at Heritage Park, 250 N. Fairfield Road, Kaysville. For more information, visit kaysvillecity.com.

Layton

Aug. 2: “The Emperor’s New Groove”

Aug. 9: “Matilda”

Aug. 23: “You’ve Got Mail”

Aug. 30: “Guardians of the Galaxy”

Davis Arts’ Free Friday Film Series uses an outdoor LED screen so they don’t have to wait to start until dusk. There will be different pre-movie activities each Friday starting at 6:30 p.m. All movies begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Kenley Amphitheater, 403 N. Wasatch Drive, Layton. For more information, visit davisarts.org.

Nephi

Aug. 16: “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World”

Bring your blankets and lawn chairs and enjoy movies in the Nephi City Park, 600 N. Main. Concessions will be available to purchase. For more information, visit nephi.utah.gov.

Monticello

Aug. 2: “Smallfoot,” Pioneer Park, 9165 Fallon Ave.

Aug. 16: “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part,” Montiview Park, 5980 Jason Ave.

Monticello Movies in the Park will be happening this August. Bring blankets and chairs and the whole family. Movies start at dusk. For more information, visit monticellocommunitycenter.com.

Park City

Aug. 10: “Storm Boy,” Prospector Square Lot K, 1920 Prospector Ave.

Basin Recreation will be hosting outdoor movies in various locations this summer. On Aug. 23, there will be outdoor movies at Trailside Park, 5715 Trailside Drive, though voting is still open for which titles will be shown. The Aug. 10 movie will be a drive-in and costs $9. For more information, visit parkcityfilm.org.

Vernal

Aug. 9: “Captain Marvel”

Uintah Recreation District is putting on its summer Movie in the Park series again. All movies will start at dusk and will be held at the Uintah Community Center, 610 S. Vernal Ave., Vernal. For more information, visit uintahrecreation.org.

Lehi

Aug. 2: “Incredibles 2”

Aug. 9: “Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back”

Thanksgiving Point’s Outdoor Movie Series is back this year with a great series of movies. Concessions will be available to purchase. Admission is free for Thanksgiving Point members, $20 for adults and $15 for children ages 3-12 and seniors. All movies will be at the Waterfall Amphitheatre in Ashton Gardens, 3900 N. Garden Drive, Lehi. For more information, visit thanksgivingpoint.org.

Lindon

Aug. 6: “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” Pioneer Park, 150 S. 500 East

Movies in the Park in Lindon will be hosted by the Bank of Utah and Lindon Parks and Recreation this year. All movies are free and begin at dusk. For more information, visit lindonrecreation.org.

Orem

Aug. 7: “Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald”

Aug 14: “Incredibles 2”

SCERA Shell Outdoor Theatre’s Movies Under the Stars series shows outdoor movies on a large screen in the shell amphitheatre. Tickets are $4 for adults and $3 for children ages 3-11 and seniors. Passes to all six movies are $12 for adults and $9 for children and seniors. The amphitheater is at 699 S. State, Orem. For more information, visit scera.org.

Pleasant Grove

Aug 9: “Aquaman,” City Pool, 532 S. 300 E St.

Join the Pleasant Grove Recreation Center for outdoor movies. Games and prizes start at 8 p.m. The first two will be at Pleasant Grove Recreation Center, 547 S. Locust Ave., Pleasant Grove. For more information, visit plgrove.org.

Hurricane

Aug. 3: “Wonder Park”

Aug. 17: “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World”

Sept. 14: “Captain Marvel”

Sept. 28: “Dumbo”

Enjoy movies at the pool and the park all summer long. The June 15 and Aug. 3 movies will be held at the City Pool, 750 N. 200 West. The rest will be at the Community Center, 63 S. 100 West, Hurricane, Washington County. For more information, visit hurricanerecreation.com.

St. George

Aug. 9: “Footloose”

Aug. 23: “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part”

Sunset on the Square in St. George is happening every second and fourth Friday this summer at the St. George Town Square. Bring blankets and lawn chairs to see these free and family-friendly movies. All movies will be held at 50 S. Main., St. George, at dusk. For more information, visit sgcity.org.

Ogden

Aug. 5: “Ralph Breaks the Internet”

Aug. 12: “Remember the Titans”

Aug. 19: “Who Framed Roger Rabbit”

Monday Night Movies are back with a broad range of movies. The Backstage Bistro will be open for food purchases. Movies begin at 7:30 p.m., at the Ogden Amphitheater, 343 25th St. For more information, visit ogdencity.com.

Huntsville

Aug. 5: “Avengers: Infinity War”

Comment on this story Go up to the mountains and enjoy free movies from Snowbasin Resort. Starting at 6 p.m., there will be Kid’s Zone activities, mini golf and food available to purchase. Movies begin at dusk at Earl’s Lodge Lawn, 3925 E. Snowbasin Road, Huntsville, Weber County. For more information, visit snowbasin.com.

Pioneer Day

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 23, 2019

 

How is Utah celebrating Pioneer Day? With parades, fireworks and music — and, for some, pie and beer. Here, in chronological order, is a listing of the major events — and a few minor ones — tied to the Pioneer Day holiday.

 

Days of ’47 Cowboy Games & Rodeo. Utah State Fairpark, 1000 W. North Temple, Salt Lake City. Events start at 8 p.m. each night. Tickets, from $14 to $59 per night, at Smith’s Tix.

Ogden PRCA Rodeo. Ogden Pioneer Stadium, 668 17th Street, Ogden. Starts at 7:30 p.m. each night. Tickets, from $15 to $30 per night, at Smith’s Tix.

Fiesta Days Rodeo, with PRCA Xtreme Bull Riding on Saturday. Spanish Fork Fairgrounds Arena, 475 S. Main, Spanish Fork. Starts 8 p.m. each night. Tickets, starting at $7, at www.sfcitytix.org.

Deseret News Marathon. Marathon starts at the top of Big Mountain, above Emigration Canyon; half-marathon starts at the top of Little Mountain; 10K starts at Research Park, 500 Wakara Way, University of Utah campus, Salt Lake City; 5K starts at Wasatch Elementary School, 1150 E. South Temple, Salt Lake City. Start times are 5:50 a.m. (marathon and half-marathon), 6 a.m. (10K) and 7 a.m. (5K). Registration fees are $85 (marathon), $75 (half-marathon), $45 (10K), and $35 for adults, $12 for youth 14 and under (5K).

Sunrise Service, with music performed by the Salt Lake Valley Combined Institute Choir and organist Linda Margetts. The Assembly Hall on Temple Square, 50 W. North Temple, Salt Lake City. Service begins at 7 a.m.; guests must be seated by 6:50 a.m. Free, no ticket required.

Pioneer Day Celebration. Willow Park, 450 W. 700 South, Logan. Activities include a fun run at 7 a.m., parade at noon, live music in the evening, and fireworks at 10 p.m. Free.

Days of ’47 Parade. Runs through downtown Salt Lake City, starting at South Temple ad State Street, moving east to 200 East, then south to 900 South, then east to 600 East, ending at Liberty Park. Parade starts at 9 a.m. Free to sit along the parade route; be mindful of private property; many people camp out overnight for good spots.

Ogden Pioneer Days Grand Parade, along Washingon Boulevard fro 31st Street to 20th Street. Starts at 9 a.m. Free.

Fiesta Days Grand Parade. Center Street and Main Street, Spanish Fork. Parade starts at 9 a.m. Free. Followed by a craft fair, carnival and entertainment, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., City Park, 49 S. Main St.; concert with country musician Charley Jenkins, at Sports Park, 295 Volunteer Drive, at 8 p.m., followed by fireworks at 10:30 p.m.

Pioneer Day at Antelope Island State Park, west of Ogden. Activities start at 10 a.m. Free.

NACIP Powwow and Festival. Liberty Park, 600 East and 900 South, Salt Lake City. Starts at noon, runs into the night, with fireworks at 10 p.m. Admission is $5, or free for people under 3 and over 65.

Pie and Beer Day. Beer Bar, 161 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City. Activities from 2 to 6 p.m. Presented by KUAA-FM and the Utah Arts Alliance. Admission is $25; must be 21 or older.

Layton Pioneer Day. Layton Commons Park, 437 N. Wasatch Dr., Layton. Food from 4 to 7 p.m.; concert by Riders in the Sky (at Ed Kenley Centennial Amphitheater, 403 N. Wasatch Dr., Layton), Electric Light Parade at 10 p.m., with party to follow. Free.

Looking for other upcoming outdoor Summer Soirées - check out these Farm to Table, Chef-curated, locally sourced dinners flourish—with altitude.

Hearth and Hill Copper Moose Farm Stand Dinners

July 27, August 16, September 14, 2019 coppermoosefarm.com/events

Hearth and Hill Chef Jordan Harvey is bringing the table to the farm as local chefs—and a petite gathering of diners—tuck into homegrown eats at Copper Moose Farm Stand. “We want the dinners to stand out and be something special,” Harvey says. “You can go to all of these restaurants in Park City anytime, but we wanted to bring the chefs in and create a really unique event.” The three intimate events are $200 per person and limited to 20 people, which covers a cocktail hour, passed hors d’oeuvres, and a multicourse dinner with wine pairings. The chef-hosts include Ashley and Vanessa Chapman of Main Street Social, Adam Ross from Twisted Fern, and Phil Grubisa from Beltex Meats.

Copper Moose Harvest Dinner

August 10, 2019 coppermoosefarm.com/events

This once-a-year dinner is held in the fields of Copper Moose Farm (1285 Old Ranch Rd). Surrounded by crops and greenhouses, five chefs each execute a different course for a crowd of about 100 people ($230 per person). Diners are treated to live music, farm-inspired cocktails from Alpine Distilling, and wine pairings. “At Copper Moose, we grow great produce, but we also have this great group of chefs around us who are food nerds in their own areas,” says farm manager Daisy Fair. “To bring it all home on-site at a farm feels just right.”

100 Mile Meal to Benefit Recycle Utah

August 10, 2019 recycleutah.org/events/100-mile-meal

From the fruits (even cocktail garnishes) and herbs to the meat and bread, every ingredient used at this annual event is sourced from within 100 miles of Park City. Held on a private farm in Oakley, the culinary team from Park City Mountain will create a five-course meal for 160 guests ($200 per person, $1,500 for a table). The goal of the event, says Recycle Utah’s Haley Lebsack, is to share how delicious eating local can be. “Not only are you decreasing your environmental impact by eating local, you are also supporting your neighbors, community leaders, and friends,” she says. “My favorite part of this event is that we invite the farmers who donate food to join us, so guests can get to know the men and women who helped to produce this amazing meal.”

 

Family Time

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 17, 2019

Warm days and cool nights add to the magic of Park City and enjoying that time with your family is hands down the greatest gift. So, the Wife and I wanted to share a great article from Ski Utah on how to Spend 36 hours in SLC's Mountains as a Family - You have a total of 36 hours to spend in Salt Lake City mountains, so what are you going to do?! 36 hours isn’t a lot of time for a mountain adventure-loving family, but it is enough time to have a fantastic adventure. Here are a few things you can do with 36 hours in SLC when you like a little bit of adventure with the kiddos!

Hike the Wasatch National Forest - If you love the mountains, Wasatch National Forest is super close to Salt Lake City and offers HUNDREDS of hikes. Here are links to stories about our favorite trails:

Enjoy Resort Activities - When you don’t have a lot of time for mountain adventures, but still want to be close to nature, book a stay in the mountains and enjoy the activities there.
  • Solitude Mountain Resort: During the summer months, you can take scenic chair lift rides, go hiking, biking, enjoy a game of disc golf, or visit culinary events. Stay at one of the many options that Solitude offers for lodging. Free yoga every Saturday and free concerts every Sunday in the Village.
  • Brighton: There's no lack of scenic trails at Brighton. Visit lakes Catherine, Mary and Martha or take a simple stroll around Silver Lake with the family. Brighton serves food too, so grab a bite before heading back down the canyon.
  • Alta Ski Area: There's no secret that the locals love to hike at Alta in the summer to enjoy the wildflowers and cool air. Park at Wildcat and take a $5/person shuttle up the Summer Road for easier access. Want a mountain retreat? Book a night at Alta Lodge or The Snowpine Lodge.
  • Snowbird: the mecca for summer adventures. Purchase an activities pass for all day adventure and access to the ropes course, mountain coaster, climbing wall, alpine slide, Tram, Peruvian Chairlift and more.
Take a Scenic Drive- Sometimes, the best adventures are just getting in your car with an old school map and just driving. In fact, it's even more of an adventure if you get a little “lost.” This is especially fun with kids. Try it during the evening or early morning.

Here are a few drives to get lost on:

  • Big Cottonwood Canyon - Head all the way to the top of Guardsman Pass. Here you'll find beautiful views down BCC and into Park City. Take a quick hike to Bloods Lake - very family friendly.
  • Little Cottonwood Canyon - Park at the Wildcat base area of Alta Ski Area and opt for a quick hike around. Watch for moose and be careful where you step -- please don't damage the wildflowers!
  • Mirror Lake Highway - Head east from Kamas through the national forest. It takes about an hour and a half each way. The temperatures are usually 10 - 20 degrees cooler than the valley and will often be below freezing at night, even in the summer months. So bring a jacket. You'll also want to stop at the Mirror Lake Diner for a farm fresh meal.
  • Ogden Canyon - SR - 39 will take you to Pineview Reservoir. A great place for water-skiing, fishing, and paddle boarding.
  • Provo Canyon - Make a stop at Sundance Mountain Resort. Grab a picnic lunch from The Deli, stretch your legs and jump back in the car to find the perfect picnic spot.
Camp in Big or Little Cottonwood Canyon- Both the Spruces Campground (Big Cottonwood) and Tanner's Flat and Albion Basin (Little Cottonwood) are excellent family camp spots. Book your sites early and bring the s'mores. There are endless activities surrounding these campsites and they provide a break from the valley heat. For help on sleeping comfortably outside with little ones, visit Brooke's story about, well, just that!

Looking for musical options in town, Park City Magazine shares A Music-Lover’s Guide to the Packed Summer Concert Scene. Not too long ago, live music was an occasional occurrence in Park City. Today, the town’s robust summer concert calendar means serious tunes virtually every day of the week. From 5,000-person mega shows at Deer Valley Resort’s amphitheater to bitty gigs in pocket parks, here’s our can’t-miss summer music list.

Deer Valley Concert Series @ Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater

June 30–September 7 deervalleyconcertseries.com

Pack your cheese and charcuterie, and head to the slopes for this big-name series. Now in its second season, the lineup ranges from Michael Franti & Spearhead to fan-favorite Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals, plus British indie rockers Squeeze. BYO snacks and sips, or preorder a gourmet picnic.

Deer Valley Music Festival @ Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater

June 28–August 10 deervalleymusicfestival.org

Utah Symphony | Utah Opera flees the city for this annual, 19-show extravaganza. Settle in for tunes ranging from Disney classics to chamber music to pop paired with symphonic sound—everything from Kristen Chenoweth of Wicked fame and The Music of the Rolling Stones to a tribute to Aretha Franklin and the beloved Patriotic Celebration.

Main and Farmer’s Market Stages @ Park Silly Sunday Market

Sundays, June 2–September 22 (except August 4–18) parksillysundaymarket.com

Cut loose on Main Street at this massive weekly event, featuring artisans, local eats, a beer and Bloody Mary garden, and a vast array of entertainers—from strolling opera singers to full-fledged bands. Tunes are performed on two stages: full bands on Main, and smaller, solo performances on the Farmers Market Stage near the Post Office.

Noches De Verano @ City Park

Monday evenings, June 3–July 1 mountaintownmusic.org

From salsa to mariachi to Mexican folk, experience a mini festival celebrating Latino culture at City Park on select summer Mondays. Get up and groove to the sounds of Gente X Norteña Band or sizzling Rumba Libre, or just chill in the quintessential old Park City ambience. Latino art and a taco truck round out the celebration.

Hops on the Hill @ Stein Eriksen Lodge

Tuesday evenings, July 9–August 27 steinlodge.com/hops.html

Craft brews and curated bites pair with live music at this midmountain Deer Valley alfresco series. For $20, get Chef Zane Holmquist’s sweet and savory nibbles partnered with $20 craft beer pairings, both served from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Stein’s outdoor deck. Listen to tunes, ranging from acoustic harmonies to sophisticated jazz, on the adjacent lawn for free; à la carte eats and drinks also available.

Music on the Patio @ Park City Library

Wednesdays at 11 a.m., June 19–August 28 mountaintownmusic.org

Whether you’re checking out books or looking for a midday break, the library’s patio is the place on Wednesdays. Grab a coffee at Lucky Ones and watch solo artists perform free, intimate concerts.

Grand Valley Bank Community Concert Series @ Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater

Wednesday evenings, June 19–August 21 mountaintownmusic.org

This free, family-friendly, community tradition is all about kicking back, catching up with friends, and taking in some solid tunes. Don’t miss popular acts, such as Muddpuddle (June 19), Pixie and The Partygrass Boys (July 10), and Jägertown (July 17), as well as a community jam session on August 21. Pack snacks and low chairs.

Grand Lawn @ DeJoria Center

Thursday evenings, June 27–August 1 (No show July 4) dejoriacenter.com

In nearby Kamas, find a hopping outdoor concert scene on the lawn. From blues bands and country duos to funky jazz and rock ’n’ roll, the diverse lineup suits the laid-back, country setting. Low chairs, snacks, and blankets welcome. No outside alcohol allowed. State Road Tavern open for dinner and drinks (concessions available, too).

Summer Concert Series @ Canyons Village

Thursdays and Saturdays at 6 p.m., July 6–August 29 parkcitymountain.com

Canyons Village is abuzz with surprisingly well-known artists at no ticket charge. Blitzen Trapper (August 3), Ryan Shupe & the Rubber Band (August 15), The Motet (August 24), and many more rock the Canyons outdoor stage this season. Come early to hike or bike via the gondola, before the show begins.

Park City Limits @ Silver Star Café

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings thesilverstarcafe.com

Take in music with Uinta Mountain views at this petite patio series. The acoustic dinner shows feature acts like Triggers and Slips and Hot House West playing folk, jazz, blues, Americana, and bluegrass tunes paired with top-notch eats. No cover charge, but dinner reservations are recommended as space is limited.

Mountain Town Music @ Miner’s Plaza

Saturday afternoons, June 29–August 24 mountaintownmusic.org

Catch singer-songwriters, acoustic bands, and solo artists as they take the stage at this intimate pocket park on Historic Main Street.

Park City Institute’s Big Stars, Bright Nights @ The Eccles Center for the Performing Arts

July 7–August 24 parkcityinstitute.org

An outlier in this summer’s concert scene, this popular series (formerly at Deer Valley Resort) moves inside for the 2019 season, taking advantage of PCI’s year-round 1,200-seat performing arts center. The country-heavy lineup includes The Brothers Osborne (July 7), quintet The Punch Brothers (July 30), Taj Mahal Quartet with songwriter Marc Cohn and The Blind Boys of Alabama (August 13), pop-country group Gone West (August 16), and singer CAM (August 24). Theater-quality production, cushy seats, and no rainouts also mean no BYO drinks or eats.

Local goods to pack for your picnic

Alpine Distilling Summit Gin & Preserve Liqueur

Class up your picnic by mixing local Park City Summit Gin, Preserve Liqueur, soda water, and lemon for a fresh, simple cocktail. alpinedistilling.com

Ritual Chocolate Mid Mountain Blend

End your night on a sweet note with Park City’s own bean-to-bar chocolate, which boasts a not-too-intense flavor with fruity, earthy, and floral notes. ritualchocolate.com

Heber Valley Artisan Cheese

Localize your cheese plate with cheddar, Parmesan, Swiss, or curds made in Midway.

hebervalleyartisancheese.com

Deer Valley Picnic Bag

Preorder a bag to pick up at Deer Valley’s Snow Park amphitheater. From cheese plates to beet salads and homemade pastries, bags include all the fixin’s for a gourmet feast.

deervalley.com

Reasons to Hire a Real Estate Agent

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 10, 2019

Since 2006 my wife and I have had the great pleasure of being a part of the real estate community. We represent buyers and sellers in the Greater Park City area as well as in Salt Lake City. This week we wanted to share the Top 6 Reasons to Hire a Real Estate Agent to Sell Your Home - As a homeowner, there's only so much you can do when trying to sell your home. When it comes to real estate, hiring a professional agent is more of a need than an option. A real estate agent's greatest goal is to sell your house at a higher price in a lesser number of days.

While it's possible to sell a home without representation, it's important to remember that real estate is also a legal matter. In fact, there has been a massive increase in scammers targeting real estate clients because they're fully aware that some people don't seek agent representation. If you decide to sell your house, understand that it's a heavy process with many stakes involved. Here are some reasons why hiring a real estate agent is crucial:

Years of Experience - Nothing can beat experience. As a homeowner, you might believe in relying on the internet, family or friends; however, the experience of a professional real estate agent is what will truly help you secure a worthy investment. With years of experience in cracking the real estate code, agents know the times of the year when house prices go up and when potential buyers are most active. Hiring an agent will save you the stress of learning everything about buying and selling a house.

Negotiation Skills - Experience also endows real estate agents with impressive negotiation skills. Dealing with buyers, brokers and legal representatives on a daily basis, real estate professionals know exactly what each stakeholder wants. Agents have the skills to negotiate prices well and secure a worthy investment. You'll never be disappointed after hiring a competent agent because they'll provide the best representation for your property.

Access to a Critical Database - Real estate agents have deep connections and access to crucial real estate databases. The Multiple Listing Service (MLS) is an interface of all the current homes for sale. When you hire an agent, all the information required to sell your house will be available over the MLS for other agents. Your agent can effectively advertise your property by featuring an attractive package. With instant visibility, there are far more chances of selling your house quicker than when you may have tried it on your own. With greater access to buyers, you can sell your house fast instead of waiting and lowering the price. Hiring an agent may seem costly at first, but it can give you the upper hand in steering the price of your house.

Network of Professionals - Agents can never give their best service in isolation. With experience and education, they will always have a pool of professionals that they stay in touch with for speedy selling, buying and referrals. Agents work with many other people who can directly impact the price of your property.

Knowledge of Market Conditions - Real estate professionals have to stay updated with the rising house prices, and the best times to invest in the real estate market. They have insights into the market conditions that'll eventually dictate the price at which you sell your house. There are many calculations involved when it comes to learning the real estate climate. Data like the average-per-square foot cost, average house sale prices, list-to-sold prices and how long a house stays on the market are all things that ultimately decide how fast your house sells. Learning about this can be a hefty task, especially when you have to take care of the investment and insurance. Instead of taking all the stress yourself, hire an agent to guide you accordingly. You'll save both time and money.

Confidentiality and Security - As mentioned, with scammers on the rise, it only makes sense to hire a professional who will keep all your information confidential until the deal closes. With your identity papers, bank statements and mortgages at stake, hiring an agent is critical. Sometimes, even the smoothest transactions can have issues like tax assessments and missing stamps. Missing even a single step of selling your house can come back to haunt you. Enjoy the peace of mind that follows placing your property in safe hands.

Buying and selling a house is no joke—it's a lifetime investment. While these are only a handful of reasons eliciting the importance of a real estate agent, hiring one will save you from the trouble of paperwork, taxing complications, and, most of all, fraudulent schemes.

With the beautiful weather in Park City, it is time to be outside and if you’re lucky enough to have outdoor space (even if it’s just a sliver of grass) you’ll want to make the most of it. But knowing where to start can be tricky. Here are 7 Design Ideas to Make the Most of Your Backyard:

Swinging Seat - If you have the space, consider creating a variety of seating options — the neutral color palette ties together each of these. Warning: Hanging a hammock or swinging chair means that guests will be rushing over to your place whenever they get the chance. Kids and adults alike will love kicking back with a good book and a refreshing glass of lemonade all summer long. And when in doubt: add string lights.

Family Friendly Features - This backyard allows for plenty of space to play. But despite all of the kid-friendly equipment, it still manages to look stylish. Hang a macramé piece under a covered area for a boho touch, and set out some mod chairs to keep the look current.

Comfy and Cool - How stunning is this covered patio space? The homeowners with the backyard featured in the previous photo also did an excellent job styling this seating area. We love the addition of string bulb lights (again, a backyard essential) and the fun and funky egg chair. Pillows and a throw blanket add texture and necessary warmth for chillier nights.

Festive Fire Pit - Gather round! Group your chairs around a fire pit and set out poufs for extra seating if the weather permits. You’ll have the ideal space to spend many a summer evening talking and laughing with friends and neighbors—and indulging in a s’more or two.

Poolside Perch - Lucky enough to have a pool? Add a comfy outdoor couch and chairs, and you’ll never want to leave the yard. Adults can supervise little ones while kicking back and relaxing in the shade.

Patterned Patio - Having guests over? Jazz up patio furniture with the addition of colorful throws and patterned pillows to bring a well-traveled look to your backyard space. Pattern-mixing newbie? Stick to one color palette (here: pinks, blues, browns, and whites), to tie everything together.

Kids Only - Create a special oasis for the kids by setting up an outdoor dining space that’s just their size. Giant buckets make for great toy storage (which means easy access while the adults are still eating).

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Courchevel Bistro

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 03, 2019

Judy & I had the pleasure of dinning at the new Courchevel Bistro in Old Town yesterday evening. It is the newest Talisker Club downtown dining and gathering experience. Named for Park City’s sister city in the French Alps. Courchevel is situated within the historic Coal & Lumber building on lower Main Street. And let me tell you we had an awesome dinner! Courchevel Bistro presents artfully crafted inventive European-French insured with only the freshest local ingredients. Imagine the new age cooking of the northern French Alps in wintertime to the Mediterranean Riviera region in the summers—with Utah’s four seasons matching the origins perfectly.

No, we do not work for Talisker, nor do we have any affiliation with them, I just felt compelled to let you know about this wonderful new restaurant in Park City. I was “blown away” by the food and service or I wouldn’t be writing this - by the way I spent my previous life (40 years) in food and beverage management. We had the opportunity to meet with Mike Canzano (Talisker Real Estate), who was checking in on guest and members of Talisker, as well as a chance to speak with the Executive Chef, Clement Gelas and hear his excitement of sharing culinary influences from his home country of France and the Rhone Valley. I have always enjoyed and appreciated when the Chef “works” the dining room meeting customers and explaining his thoughts behind the dishes his staff prepares - he certainly is passionate about his food and it shows.

I had the Slow Roasted Rack Of Pork after enjoying Corn Bisque and Judy had the Arctic Char Meuniere after almost licking the bowl of Risotto De Crozetes. We look forward to going back and exploring other menus items and I highly recommend you do the same! The restaurant is also open to the public. Oh yes, I almost forgot, try the Dark Chocolate with Charteuse and Fresh fruit for dessert!

Happy 4th of July! Ramon and Judy

 
 
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